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A BIBLIOGRAPHY 

OF 

JAMES RUSSELL LOWELL 




M4^ 



A BIBLIOGRAPHY OF 



JAMES EUSSELL LOWELL 



COMPILED BY GEORGE WILLIS COOKE 




BOSTON AND NEW YORK 

HOUGHTON MIFFLIN AND COMPANY 

MDCCCCVI 



PREFACE 

An attempt has been made in this book to 
give a complete list of Lowell's writings, and a se- 
lected list of what is most important that has been 
said about him, for the use of students, librarians, 
collectors, and others. No one who has any idea 
of what such a work implies in its preparation can 
anticipate that it will be complete in every par- 
ticular or free from errors. The compiler has 
tried to avoid unnecessary blunders, and to make 
his work a helpful guide to those who may need 
it. As a literary worker he has had in mind the 
requirements of students rather than collectors in 
the arrangement of his materials. At the same 
time, he has anticipated the demand of the bib- 
liographer for details and accuracy. 

After a chronological list of Lowell's books, 
and another of Lowell bibliographies, there is 
given an alphabetical arrangement of his single 
titles, including poems, essays, criticisms, speeches, 
etc. In this list of single titles the place and 
date of the first appearance of each piece is 
briefly noted, also the place and date of its book 
publication. Important changes are noted, but 
no attempt has been made to give every form 
in which any poem or essay has appeared. In 



[ viii ] 

this list the prose titles have been printed in 
roman, the poems in italic, and the book titles 
in small capitals. 

The early poems were in 1877 separated into 
"Earlier" and "Miscellaneous," and these per- 
manent divisions have been indicated by brackets. 
The same has been done for " Memorial Verses " 
and "Poems of the War," to signify their sepa- 
ration from previous collections or groups. 

The single works have been grouped together, 
in order that the various editions and other 
bibliographical details may be fully noted. There 
has been added a list of the most important 
criticisms, guides to study, and book-sale prices. 
It is hoped this arrangement will prove help- 
ful, not only to students, but also to librarians 
and bibliographers. To bring everything relat- 
ing to each of the books together it has been 
thought will prove a useful arrangement. 

Under the head of complete editions will be 
found noted the successive additions which have 
been made to them, and the changes which 
have been made in the arrangement of titles 
and books. The contents of the several editions 
are given whenever there have been additions 
or rearrangements. 

Since many of the notices and criticisms 
do not relate to particular books, an alphabetical 
list has been given of those most worthy of 



[k] 

attention, which repeats those presented under 
the individual titles. Lowell made a large num- 
ber of speeches and addresses, the titles of which 
it has been thought best to place together, in 
order that their various repetitions and publica- 
tions may be noted. 

Lowell frequently changed the titles of his 
poems. Wherever this was done they have been 
listed under both titles. Under each the title 
is given in brackets as it appeared in the peri- 
odical or book mentioned, having its place on 
the same line. 

The exact title-page of each of Lowell's books 
is given as it was worded in the first edition. 
Following the title-page date is given that of 
copyright and of actual publication in brackets, 
in those instances where the two do not agree. 

In order to make this work more nearly com- 
plete, it has been thought best to include the 
prices at which first editions have been sold in 
recent years. These vary greatly, the price de- 
pending on the condition of the book, the com- 
peting demand for it, and whether it has special 
features which commend it to collectors. It is 
impossible in many instances to recover these 
details, therefore the prices given are suggestive 
only of what the first editions are likely to bring 
when in good condition. 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 



CHRONOLOGICAL LIST OF 
LOWELL'S WORKS 

1838 Harvardiana. Boston. 

Class Poem. Cambridge. 
1841 A Year's Life. Boston. 

1843 The Pioneer. Boston. 

1844 Poems. Cambridge. 

Conversations on Some of the Old Poets. Cambridge. 

1848 Poems. Second Series. Cambridge. 
A Fable for Critics. New York. 
The Biglow Papers. Cambridge. 

The Vision of Sir Launfal. Cambridge. 

1849 Poems. 2 volumes. Boston. 

1855 Poems of Maria Lowell. Cambridge. 

1858 Poetical Works. Boston. 

1862 Mason and Slidell: A Yankee Idyll. Boston. 

1864 Fireside Travels. Boston. 

1865 Ode recited at the Harvard Commemoration. Cam- 

bridge. 

1867 The Biglow Papers. Second Series. Boston. 

1868 Under the Willows, and Other Poems. Boston. 

1870 The Cathedral. Boston. 
Among My Books. Boston. 

1871 My Study Windows. Boston. 

1876 Among My Books. Second Series. Boston. 

1877 Three Memorial Poems. Boston. 
Complete Poetical Works. Boston. 

1886 Democracy, and Other Addresses. Boston. 
1888 The Independent in PoHtics. New York. 

PoUtical Essays. Boston. 

Heartsease and Rue. Boston. 



f 



[4] 

1890 Writings of James Russell Lowell, Riverside Edition, 

10 volumes. Boston. 

1891 Latest Literary Essays and Addresses. Boston. 

1892 The Old English Dramatists. Boston. 

1893 Letters. Edited by Charles Eliot Norton. New 

York. 

1895 Last Poems. Edited by Charles Eliot Norton. Bos- 

ton. 

1896 The Power of Sound: A Rhymed Lecture. New 

York. 

1897 Lectures on the English Poets. Cleveland. 
1899 Lnpressions of Spain. Boston. 

1902 Anti-Slavery Papers. Boston. 

Early Prose Writings. New York. 
1904 Complete Writings, Elmwood Edition, 16 volumes. 
Boston. 



Ip] 



BIBLIOGRAPHIES OF LOWELL 

Arnold, William Harris. First Editions of Bryant, 
Emerson, Hawthorne, Lowell, Thoreau, Whittier. 
Lowell, pp. 74-90. 

DuRGEE, George W. W. First Editions of Lowell. Book- 
buyer, July, 1899, V. 18, p. 436. 

Foley, Patrick Kevin. American Authors, 1795-1895 : a 
Bibliography of First and Notable Editions, chrono- 
logically arranged, with Notes. 1897. Lowell, pp. 
180-187. 

Hale, Edward Everett, Jr. Life of James Russell 
Lowell. Boston, Small, Maynard & Co., 1899. Biblio- 
graphy, pp. 124-128. 

Howe, Mark Antony DeWolfe. First Editions of 
Whittier and Lowell. Bookman, March, 1898, v. 7, 
p. 35. 

American Bookmen, "First Editions of Whittier 
and Lowell." New York, Dodd, Mead & Co., 1898. 

Jones, Gardner Maynard. Special Reading List of 
Lowell. Bulletin Salem Public Library, March, 
1901, V. 5, no. 19. 

Literary World. BibHography of Lowell, June 27, 
1885, V. 16, p. 225. 

List of LowelFs Books, August 29, 1891, v. 22, p. 297. 
First Editions of Fable for Critics, January 8, 22, 
March 5, 1898, v. 29, pp. 9, 26, 74. 

Livingston, Luther S. First Books of some American 
Authors. Bookman, October, 1898, v. 8, p. 138. 

ScuDDER, Horace Elisha. James Russell Lowell: A 
Biography. Boston, Houghton, Miflflin & Co., 1901. 
List of Lowell's Writings arranged in order of pub- 
Kcation, v. 2, pp. 421-447. 



P' 



[6] 

ScuDDER, Horace Elisha. Complete Poetical Works, 
Cambridge Ed. Boston, Houghton, Mifflin & Co., 
1896. A Chronological list of Mr. Lowell's Poems. 
In Appendix, pp. 481-484. 

Stone, Herbert Stuart. First Editions of American 
Authors: a Manual for Book-Lovers. Lowell, pp. 
130-132. 

Underwood, Francis Henry. James Russell Lowell. 
The Poet and the Man : Recollections and Apprecia- 
tions. Boston, Lee & Shepard, 1893. Bibliography, 
pp. 129-133. 

Wheeler, Martha Thorne. Bulletin of Bibliography. 
Best Editions of James Russell Lowell. Boston 
October, 1902, v. 3, pp. 42, 43. 



[7] 

ALPHABETICAL LIST OF 
SINGLE TITLES 

The titles of poems are given in italic, prose articles in ro- 
man, and book-titles in small capitals. K the last entry under 
a title is not that of one of Lowell's books now published, or a 
division in his Complete Poems, it indicates that that title has 
not been retained by the author in his authorized works. "When 
the titles of poems or essays have been changed, both are listed, 
that belonging to the volume indicated being enclosed in brackets. 

"A gentleness that grows of steady faith " 
A Year's Life, 1841. 

Abolitionists and Emancipation, The. 
Anti-Slavery Standard, March 1, 1849. 
Anti-Slavery Papers, 1902. 

Above and Below. 

The Young American, January, 1847, v. i, p. 54. 
Poems, second series, 1848. 
pVIiscellaneous Poems, 1877.] 

Abraham Lincoln. 

North American Review, December, 1863, v. 98, p. 241. 

[The President's Policy.] 
Pohtical Essays, 1888. 

Absence. 

Heartsease and Rue, 1888. 

After the Burial. 

Atlantic Monthly, May, 1868, v. 21, p. 627. 
Letters, v. i, p. 237, on death of second child, Rose. 
Under the Willows and Other Poems, 1868. 

Agassiz. 

Atlantic Monthly, May, 1874, v. 33, p. 386. 
Heartsease and Rue, 1888. 



[8] 

Agatha. 

Boston Miscellany, January, 1842, v. i, p. 9. 
Agro-Dolce. [To Charles Eliot Norton.] 

Under the Willows and Other Poems, 1868. 
Al Fresco. 

Anti-Slavery Standard, March 8, 1849. [A Day in June.] 

Under the Willows and Other Poems, 1868. 
Aladdin. 

Under the Willows and Other Poems, 1868. 
All Saints. 

Written for Harriet Ryan's Fair, March 20, 1859, 16mo, 
1 p. Cambridge, 1859. 

Under the Willows and Other Poems, 1868. 
''All things are sad." 

A Year's Life, 1841. 
Allegra. 

Poems, 1844. 

[Earlier Poems, 1877.] 
Ambrose. 

Anti-Slavery Standard, December 7, 1848. 

Poems, V. 2, 1849. 

[Miscellaneous Poems, 1877.] 

American Dictionary of the English Language. [Webster.] 

Atlantic Monthly, May, 1860, v. 5, p. 631. 
American Tract Society, The. 

Atlantic Monthly, July, 1858, v. 2, p. 246. 

Political Essays, 1888. 

Among My Books, Boston, 1870, 1876. 
Ancient Danish Ballads. [Prior.] 

Atlantic Monthly, January, 1861, v. 7, p. 121. 
Anecdote of Walter Savage Landor, An. 

Sheets of the Cradle, Fair for Infant Asylum, Boston, De- 
cember 6-11, 1875. Edited by Susan Hale. 
Anne, [Sonnets on Names, v.] 

A Year's Life, 1841. 



[9] 

Another Letter from B. Sawin, Esq. 

Anti-Slavery Standard, September 28, 1848. 
Biglow Papers, first series, ix. 

Another Word on Mr. Webster's Speech. 
Anti-Slavery Standard, April 4, 1850. 
Anti-Slavery Papers, 1902. 

Anti-Apis, 

Anti-Slavery Standard, January 30, 1851. 
Poetical Works, 1877. 

Anti-Slavery Criticism upon Mr. Clay's Letter. 
Anti-Slavery Standard, April 26, 1849. 
Anti-Slavery Papers, 1902. 

Anti-Slavery in the United States. 

London Daily Times, February 2, March 18, April 17, May 
18, 1846. 

Anti-Texas. Written on occasion of the Convention in 
Faneuil Hall, January 29, 1845. 

Boston Courier, January 30, 1845. [Another* Rallying Cry 

by a Yankee.] 
Poems, second series, 1848. 

Appledore. 

Graham's Magazine, February, 1851, v. 38, p. 87. 
Reprinted as "Pictures from Appledore." 

April Birth-day, An — at Sea. 
Last Poems, 1895. 

Arcadia Rediviva. 

Heartsease and Rue, 1888. 
Are ye truly Free? [Stanzas on Freedom.] 

Anti-Slavery Harp; a Collection of Songs for Anti-Slavery 
Meetings, Boston, 1849. 

Astronomer Misplaced, The. [Campaign Epigrams.] 
The Nation, October 12, 1876, v. 23, p. 224. 

At Sea. 

Leaves from my Journal, I; Fireside Travels. 



[10] 

At the Bums Centennial, January, 1859. 
Heartsease and Rue, 1888. 

At the Commencement Dinner, 1866. 

Boston Evening Transcript, July 20, 1866. 
Heartsease and Rue, 1888. 

AufWiedersehenI [Summer.] 

Putnam's Monthly, December, 1854, v. 4, p. 570. 
Under the Willows and Other Poems, 1868. 

August Afternoon, 

The Crayon, January 3, 1855. 

Afterwards, with changes, "Pictures from Appledore," I-IV. 

Auspex. 

A Masque of Poets, Boston, 1878. [My heart, I cannot still it.] 

Heartsease and Rue, 1888. 
Ballad. " Gloomily the river floweth," 

Graham's Magazine, October, 1841, v. 19, p. 171. 

Ballad of the Stranger, The, 

The Token and Atlantic Souvenir, Boston, 1842. 
Bankside, [Home of Edmund Qiiincy.] Dedham, May 
21, 1877. 
The Nation, May 31, 1877, v. 24, p. 318. 
Wensley and Other Stories, by Edmund Quincy, Boston, 

1885. 
Heartsease and Rue, 1888. 

Bartlett's " Familiar Quotations." 

North American Review, July, 1869, v. 109, p. 293. 
Beatrice, 

Atlantic Monthly, June, 1858, v. 2, p. 58. 

Heartsease and Rue, 1888. [Das Ewig-Weibliche.] 

Beatrice Cenci. [Guerrazzi.] 

Atlantic Monthly, March, 1858, v. 1, p. 638. 

Beaumont and Fletcher. 

Harper's Monthly, October, 1892, v. 85, p. 757. 
The Old English Dramatists, 1892. 



[11] 

Beaver Brook. 

Anti-Slavery Standard, January 4, 1848. [The Mill.] 
Poems, V. 2, 1849. 

Beecher's Autobiography. [Dr. Lyman.] 

North American Review, April, 1864, v. 98, p. 622. 

Beggar, The, 

A Year's Life, 1841. 
Poems, V. 1, 1849. 
[Earlier Poems, 1877.] 

Bellerophon, 

A Year's Life, 1841, 

*' Beloved, in the noisy city here." 
Poems, 1844. 
[Earlier Poems, 1877.] 

Beranger. [Translation of Sainte-Beuve.] 

Atlantic Monthly, February, 1858, v. 1, p. 469. 

Bibliographical Guide to American Literature. [Triibner.] 
Atlantic Monthly, June, 1859, v. 3, p. 775. 

Bihliolatres. 

Anti-Slavery Standard, May 24, 1849. 
Poems, v. 2, 1849. 
[Miscellaneous Poems, 1877.] 

BiGLOw Papers, 1848, 1867. 

Birch-Tree, The. 

Poems, second series, 1848. 

Birdofredum Sawin, Esq., to Mr. Hosea Biglow. 

Atlantic Monthly, January, March, 1862, v. 9, pp. 126, 385. 
Biglow Papers, second series, I. 

Birthday Verses. 

Atlantic Monthly, January, 1877, v. 39, p. 60. 
Heartsease and Rue, 1888. 

Bittersweet. [Holland.] 

Atlantic Monthly, May, 1859, v. 3, p. 651. 



[12] 

Black Preacher, The. 

Atlantic Monthly, April, 1863, v. 13, p. 465. 
Heartsease and Rue, 1888. 

Bobolink, The. 

Southern Literary Messenger, July, 1840, v. 6, p. 521. 
A Year's Life, 1841. 

Bon Voyage, 

Heartsease and Rue, 1888. 

Books and Libraries. 

Address at Chelsea Public Library, 1885. 
Literary and Political Addresses, 1904. 

Book of British Ballads, The. 
The Pioneer, February, 1843. 

Boss, The. 

Heartsease and Rue, 1888. 
Brakes, The. 

Masque of Poets, Boston, 1878. [Red Tape.] 

Heartsease and Rue, 1888. 

Broken Tryst, The. 

Heartsease and Rue, 1888. 

Browning's Plays and Poems. 

North American Review, April, 1848, v. 66, p. 357. 

Buffalo Convention, The. 

Anti-Slavery Standard, August 10, 1848, 
Anti-Slavery Papers, 1902. 

Burial of Theobald, The. 
The Liberty Bell, 1849. 

California. 

Anti-Slavery Standard, November 29, 1849. 
Anti-Slavery Papers, 1902. 

CalKng Things by their Right Names. 
Anti-Slavery Standard, November 9, 1848. 
Anti-Slavery Papers, 1902. 



[13] 

Callirhde, 

Graham's Magazine, March, 1841, p. 100. 

Cambridge Thirty Years Ago. [A Memoir addressed to 
Edelmann Storg (W. W. Story) in Rome.] 
Putnam's Monthly, April, May, 1853, v. 3, pp. 379, 473. 
Fireside Travels, 1864. 

Campaign Epigrams. 

The Nation, September 14, October 12, 1876, v. 23, pp. 163, 

224. 
Partly in Heartsease and Rue, 1888. 

Canada. 

Anti-Slavery Standard, November 1, 1849. 
Anti-Slavery Papers, 1902. 

Captive, The. 

The Missionary Memorial: A Literary and Religious Sou- 
venir, New York, 1846. 
Poems, second series, 1848. 
[Miscellaneous Poems, 1877.] 

Carlyle. 1866. 

North American Review, April, 1866, v. 152, p. 419. 
My Study Windows, 1871. 

Caroline. [Sonnets on Names, iv.] 
A Year's Life, 1841. 

Casa sin Alma. Recuerdo de Madrid. 
Heartsease and Rue, 1888. 

Cathedral, The. 

Atlantic Monthly, January, 1870, v. 25, p. 1. 
Boston, Fields, Osgood & Co., 1870. 
Poetical Works, 1877. 

Changed Perspective. 

Heartsease and Rue, 1888. 

Changeling, The. 
Poems, V. 2, 1849. 
[Miscellaneous Poems, 1877.] 



[14] 

Chapman. 

Harper's Magazine, September, 1892, v. 85, p. 561. 

The Old Enghsh Dramatists, 1892. 
Chaucer. 

North American Review, July, 1870, v. Ill, p. 165. 

My Study Windows, 1871. 

Chippewa Legend, A. 
The Liberty Bell, 1844. 
Poems, 1844. 
[Miscellaneous Poems, 1877.] 

Christmas Carol, A. [For the Sunday-school Children of 
the Church of the Disciples.] 

Heartsease and Rue, 1888. 
Church, The. 

A Year's Life, 1841. 
Church and Clergy, The. 

Pennsylvania Freeman, February 27, 1845. 

Anti-Slavery Papers, 1902. 
Church and Clergy Again. 

Pennsylvania Freeman, March 27, 1845. 

Anti-Slavery Papers, 1902. 

Church's " Legende of Goode Women." 

North American Review, April, 1864, v. 98, p. 626. 
Class Day. 

Harvard Book, Boston, 1878. 
Class Poem. 

Cambridge, 1838. 
Coincidence, A. [Campaign Epigrams.] 

The Nation, September 14, v. 23, p. 163. 
Coleridge. 

Address on unveiling bust at Westminster Abbey, May 
1885. 

Literary and Political Addresses, 1890. 

Collins's "Voyage Down the Amoor." 

Atlantic Monthly, June, 1860, v. 5, p. 757. 



[15] 

Columbus. 

Poems, second series, 1848. 

pVliscellaneous Poems, 1877.] 
Compromise. 

Anti-Slavery Standard, March 1, 1850. 

Anti-Slavery Papers, 1902. 

Conduct of Life. [Emerson.] 

Atlantic Monthly, February, 1861, v. 7, p. 254. 

" Conquerors of the New World and their Bondsmen, The." 

Anti-Slavery Standard, October 12, 26, 1848. 

Anti-Slavery Papers, 1902. 
Contrast, A. 

Liberty Chimes, Providence, 1845. 

Poems, second series, 1848. 

[Miscellaneous Poems, 1877.] 

CONVEKSATIONS ON SoME OF THE OlD PoETS. 
Cambridge, 1844. 

Copeland's " Country Life." 

Atlantic Monthly, p. 384, September, 1859, v. 4, p. 254. 
Course of the Whigs, The. 

Anti-Slavery Standard, January 11, 1849. 

Anti-Slavery Papers, 1902. 
Courtin\ The. 

Biglow Papers, first series, 1848. Notices of an Independ- 
ent Press. 

Courtship of Miles Standish, The. [Longfellow.] 

Atlantic Monthly, February, 1859, v. 3, p. 129. 
Credidimus Jovem Regnare. 

Atlantic Monthly, February, 1887, v. 59, p. 246. 

Heartsease and Rue, 1888. 
Criticism and Abuse. 

Anti-Slavery Standard, September 20, 1849. 

Anti-Slavery Papers, 1902. 
Criticism and Culture. 

Century, February, 1894, v. 25 n. s., p. 515. 



[16] 

Curven's Journal and Letters. 

North American Review, January, 1865, v. 100 p. 288. 
Dancing Bear, The. 

Atlantic Monthly, September, 1875, v. 86, p. 329. 

Heartsease and Rue, 1888. 
Daniel Webster. 

Anti-Slavery Standard, July 2, 1846. 

Anti-Slavery Papers, 1902. 

Dante. 

Appleton's New American Encyclopedia, 1870. 
Fifth Annual Report, Dante Society, 1886. 
Among My Books, second series, 1876. 

Dara. 

Graham's Magazine, July, 1850, v. 37, p. 7. 

Under the Willows, 1868. 
Darkened Mind, The, 

Under the Willows and Other Poems, 1868. 
Das Ewig-Weihliche. 

Atlantic Monthly, June, 1858, v. 2, p. 58. [Beatrice.] 

Heartsease and Rue, 1888. 

David Gray's Poems, with Memoir of his Life. 

North American Review, October, 1864, v. 99. p. 627. 
Day in June, A. 

Anti-Slavery Standard, March 8, 1849. 

Under the Willows and Other Poems, 1868. [Al Fresco.] 
Day of Small Things, The. 

Anti-Slavery Standard, October 16, 1848. 

Memorial Verses, Poetical Works, 1857. [To W. L. Garrison.] 

Dead House, The. 

Atlantic Monthly, October, 1858, v. 2, p. 618. 
Under the Willows and Other Poems, 1868. 

Dead Letter, A. 

Harvardiana, May, 1838, p. 317. 
Death of Queen Mercedes. 

Heartsease and Rue, 1888. 



[17] 

Debate in the Sennit, The. 

Boston Courier, May 3, 1848. 
Biglow Papers, first series, V. 

Defrauding Nature. [Campaign Epigrams.] 
The Nation, September 14, 1876, v. 23, p. 163. 

Democracy. 

Inaugural Address Midland Institute, October 6, 1884. 

Democracy and Other Addresses, 1886. 
Departed, The. 

A Year's Life, 1841. 
[Dickens's "American Notes."] 

The Pioneer, January, 1843. 
Dictionary of Americanisms. 

Atlantic Monthly, November, 1859, v. 4, p. 638. 

Dictionary of Authors. [Alhbone.] 

Atlantic Monthly, June, 1859, v. 3, p. 775. 

Dictionary of English Etymology. [Wedgwood.] 
Atlantic Monthly, August, 1860, v. 6, p. 248. 

Dictionary of the English Language. [Worcester.] 

Atlantic Monthly, May, 1860, v. 5, p. 631. 
Dies Irae. [Coles.] 

Atlantic Monthly, June, 1860, v. 5, p. 752. 

Diplomatic Correspondence. 

North American Review, April, 1864, v. 98, p. 619. 
Diplomatic Letters from Spain. 

Critic, "Mr. Lowell in Spain," September, 1898, v. 33, p. 171. 

Century, "Lowell's Impressions of Spain," November, 
1898, V. 57, p. 140. 

Impressions of Spain, New York, 1899. 
Dirge, A. 

Graham's Magazine, July, 1842, v. 21, p. 31. 

Poems, 1844. 
Discovery, The. 

Heartsease and Rue, 1888. 



[18] 

Disquisition on Foreheads. By Job Simifrans. 
Boston Miscellany, March, 1842, v. 1, p. 134. 
Early Prose Writings, 1902. 

Disraeh's " Tancred, or the New Crusade." 

North American Review, July, 1847, v. 65, p. 201. 

Don Quixote. 

At Workingmen's College, London. 
Democracy and Other Addresses, 1886. 

Dramatic Works of John Webster. 

Atlantic Monthly, June, 1858, v. 2, p. 119. 
Dream I Had, A. 

National Anti-Slavery Standard, November 28, 1850. 
Dryden. 

North American Review, July, 1868, v. 107, p. 186. 

Among My Books, first series, 1870. 

E. G. de R, 

Heartsease and Rue, 1888. 
E Pluribus Unum. 

Atlantic Monthly, February, 1861, v. 7, p. 235. 

Political Essays, 1888. 

Earlier Poems. 

Division made in Complete Poems, 1877. 

Edgar Allan Poe. " Our Contributors." No. xvii. "Edgar 
Allan Poe." 
Graham's Magazine, February, 1845, v. 27, p. 49. 
Griswold's ed. of Poe. 
Stoddard's Works of Poe, v. 1, p. 201. 
Woodberry's ed. of Poe, v. 10, p. 247. 

Edinburgh Papers. [Chambers.] 

Atlantic Monthly, January, 1861, v. 7, p. 125. 

Edith. [Sonnets on Names, i.] 
A Year's Life, 1841. 

El Dorado. 

Anti-Slavery Papers, December 14, 1848. 



( 



[19] 

Eleanor makes Macaroons, 

Heartsease and Rue, 1888. 
Election in November, The. 

Atlantic Monthly, October, 1860, v. 6, p. 492. 

Political Essays, 1888. 

Elegy on the Death of Dr. Channing. 
The Liberty BeU, 1843. 
Poems, 1844. 
[Memorial Verses, 1857.] 

Elsie Venner. [Holmes.] 

Atlantic Monthly, April, 1861, v. 7, p. 509. 
Ember Picture, An. 

Atlantic Monthly, July, 1867, v. 20, p. 99. 

Under the Willows and Other Poems, 1868. 

Emerson the Lecturer. 

The Nation, November 12, 1868, v. 7, p. 389. 
My Study Windows, 1871. 

Endymion; a Mystical Comment on Titian's "Sacred 
and Profane Love." 

Atlantic Monthly, February, 1888, v. 61, p. 261. 
Epigram on Certain Conservatives, An. 

Broadway Journal, January 25, 1845. 
Epigram on J. M. 

Atlantic Monthly, May, 1858, v. 1, p. 846. 

Epistle to George William Curtis, An. 

Heartsease and Rue, 1888. 
Epitaph, An. 

The Nation, October 1, 1874, v. 19, p. 216. 

Epitaph, The. " What means this glosing epitaph?" 
Broadway Journal, January 11, 1845, p. 28. 
Poems, second series, 1848. 

Estrangement. 

Century, May, 1882, v. 2 n. s., p. 16. 
Heartsease and Rue, 1888. 



[20] 

Eternal One, The. 

Arcturus, May, 1842, p. 407. 

Ethnology. 

Anti-Slavery Standard, February 1, 1849. 

Anti-Slavery Papers, 1902. 
Eurydice. 

Anti-Slavery Standard, August 23, 1849. 

Poems, V. 2, 1849. 

[Miscellaneous Poems, 1877.] 

Exciting Intelligence from South Carolina. 
Anti-Slavery Standard, September 7, 1848. 
x\nti-Slavery Papers, 1902. 

Ex-Mayor's Crumb of Consolation, The; a Pathetic Ballad, 

Anti-Slavery Standard, October 26, 1848. 
Extract, An, 

The Liberty Bell, 1848. 

Extreme Unction. 

The Liberty Bell, 1847. 
Poems, second series, 1848. 
[Miscellaneous Poems, 1877.] 

Eye's Treasury, The. 

Heartsease and Rue, 1888. 

Fable for Critics, A. 
New York, 1848. 

Fact or Fancy ? 

Atlantic Monthly, March, 1887, v. 59, p. 289. 

Heartsease and Rue, 1888. 
Falcon, The. 

The Liberty Bell, 1847. [The Falconer.] 

Poems, second series, 1848. 

Poems, V. 1, 1849. [The Falcon.] 

[Miscellaneous Poems, 1877.] 

Familiar Epistle to a Friend, A. [Miss Jane Norton.] 
Atlantic Monthly, April, 1867, v. 19, p. 488. 
Under the Willows and Other Poems, 1868. 



[21] 

Fanaticism in the Navy. 

Anti-Slavery Standard, August 31, 1848. 
Anti-Slavery Papers, 1902. 

Fancies about a Rosebud. Pressed in an Old Copy of Spen- 
ser, 
Graham's Magazine, March, 1842, v. 20, p. 173. 
Poems, V. 1, 1849. 

Fancy's Casuistry, 

Under the Willows and Other Poems, 1868. 

Fantasy, A, 

Boston Miscellany, July, 1842, v. 2, p. 15. 
Poems, 1844. 

Fatal Curiosity, The. 

Victoria Regia, edited by Adelaide A. Proctor, London, 
1861, Emily Faithfull & Co. 

Fatherland, The. 

Democratic Review, October, 1843, v. 13, p. 430. 
Poems, V. 1, 1849. 
[Earlier Poems, 1877.] 

Farewell. 

Graham's Magazine, June, 1842, v. 20, p. 305. 
Feeling, A. 

A Year's Life, 1841. 
Festina Lente. 

Atlantic Monthly, April, 1862, v. 9, p. 512. 

Biglow Papers, second series, IV. 

Few Bits of Roman Mosaic, A. 

Leaves from my Journal, iv. Fireside Travels. 
Fielding. 

Address at Taunton, September 4, 1883. 

Democracy and Other Addresses, 1886. 

Fiery Trial, The. 

The Liberty Bell, 1842. 
Poems, 1844. 



[22] 

Finding of the Lyre, The. 

Under the Willows and Other Poems, 1868. 
Fireside Travels. 

Boston, 1864. 
First Client, The; with Incidental Good Precepts for 
Incipient Attorneys. 

Boston Miscellany, May, 1842, p. 228. 

Early Prose Writings, 1902. 
First Lesson in Natural History, A. 

Atlantic Monthly, December, 1859, v. 4, p. 773. 
First Snow-Fall, The. 

Anti-Slavery Standard, December 27, 1849. 

Memory and Hope, Boston, 1850. 

The Crayon, January 31, 1855, v. 1, p. 73. (Revised by 
author.) 

Under the Willows and Other Poems, 1868. 

Fitz Adam's Story. 

Atlantic Monthly, January, 1867, v. 19, p. 17. 
Part of "The Nooning," written about 1850. 
Heartsease and Rue, 1888. 

Five Indispensable Authors, The. 

Century, December, 1893, v. 25 n. s., p. 223. 
Flowers. 

Southern Literary Messenger, July, 1840, v. 6, p. 579. 

A Year's Life, 1841. 

Flying Dutchman, The. 

Atlantic Monthly, January, 1869, v. 23, p. 27. 
Heartsease and Rue, 1888. 

Follower, The. 

The Pioneer, January, 1843, p. 41. 
Footpath, The. 

Atlantic Monthly, August, 1868, v. 22, p. 252. 

Under the Willows and Other Poems, 1868. 

For an Autograph. 

Under the Willows and Other Poems, 1868. 



[23] 

Foreboding, A. 

Heartsease and Rue, 1888. 
Forest Hymn, A. [Bryant.] 

Atlantic Monthly, December, 1860, v. 6, p. 761. 

Forgetfulness. 

Anti-Slavery Standard, September 7, 1843. 
Poems, 1844. 

Forlorn, The. 
Poems, 1844. 
[Earlier Poems, 1877.] 

Forster's "Swift." 

The Nation, AprH 13, 20, 1876, v. 22, pp. 248, 265. 

Forty-four Years of the Life of a Hunter, being Reminis- 
cences of Meshach Browning. 

Atlantic Monthly, December, 1859, v. 4, p. 770. 
Fountain, The. 

Poems, V. 1, 1849. 

[Earlier Poems, 1877.] 

Fountain of Youth, The. 

Putnam's Monthly, January, 1853, v. 1, p. 45. 
Under the Willows and Other Poems, 1868. 

Fourth of July in Charleston. 

Anti-Slavery Standard, July 26, 1849. 
Anti-Slavery Papers, 1902. 

Fourth of July Ode. 

Anti-Slavery Standard, July 1, 1841. 
A Year's Life, 1841. 

Fragments. 

Century, May, 1894, v. 26 n. s., p. 24. 
Fragments of an Unfinished Poem. 

Putnam's Monthly, April, 1853, v. 1, p. 403. 

Part of "Our Own: His Wanderings and Personal Ad- 
ventures." 

Riverside Ed., v. 3, 1890. 



[24] 

*' Franciscus de Verulamio sic cogitavif 
Heartsease and Rue, 1888. 

Francis Parkman. 

Century, November, 1892, v. 23 n. s., p. 44. 

Freedom. 

Anti-Slavery Standard, June 15, 1848. 
Poems, V. 2, 1849. 
[Miscellaneous Poems, 1877.] 

French Revolution of 1848, The. 

Anti-Slavery Standard, April 13, 1848. 
Anti-Slavery Papers, 1902. 

From a ''Hasty Pudding Poem" 

Harvardiana, June, 1838, p. 343. 
"Full many noble friends " 

Poems, 1844. 

Function of the Poet, The. 

Century, January, 1894, v. 25 n. s., p. 432. 

Garfield. 

Memorial meeting in London, September 24, 1881. 
Democracy and Other Addresses, 1886. 

General Bern's Conversion. 

Anti-Slavery Standard, December 6, 1849. 
Anti-Slavery Papers, 1902. 

General McClellan's Report [on the Army of the Potomac]. 
North American Review, April, 1864, v. 98, p. 550. 
Political Essays, 1888. 

General Taylor. 

Anti-Slavery Standard, March 15, 1849. 
Anti-Slavery Papers, 1902. 

Getting Up. 

Boston Miscellany, March, 1842, v. 1, p. 111. 
Early Prose Writings, 1902. 



[25] 

Ghost Seer, The. 

The Broadway Journal, March 8, 1845. 
Poems, V. 2, 1849. 
[Miscellaneous Poems, 1877.] 

Glance behind the Curtain, A. 

Democratic Review, September, 1848, v. 13, p. 236. 
Poems, 1844. 
[Miscellaneous Poems, 1877.] 

Godminster Chimes, [Written in aid of a chime of bells 
for Christ Church, Cambridge.] 
Poetry of the Bells, Cambridge, 1858. 
Under the Willows and Other Poems, 1868. 

" Goe, Little BooJce." 
A Year's Life, 1841. 

Gold Egg; a Dream Fantasy. 

Atlantic Monthly, May, 1865, v. 15, p. 528. 
Under the Willows and Other Poems, 1868. 

Goodwin's Plutarch's Morals. 

North American Review, April, 1871, v. 112, p. 460. 

Good Word for Winter, A. 

The Atlantic Almanac for 1870, Boston, 1869. 
My Study Windows, 1871. 

Gray. 

New Princeton Review, March, 1886, v. 1, p. 153. 
Latest Literary Essays and Addresses, 1891. 

''Great human nature." 
A Year's Life, 1841. 

Great PubUc Character, A. [Josiah Quincy.] 
Atlantic Monthly, November, 1867, v. 20, p. 618. 
My Study Windows, 1871. 

''Great truths are portions of the soul of man." 
The Liberty Bell, 1842. 
Poems, 1844. 
[Eariier Poems, 1877.] 



[26] 

Green Mountains. 

A Year's Life, 1841. 

Growth of the Legend, The. A Fragment. 
Poems, second series, 1848. 
[Miscellaneous Poems, 1877.] 

Hakon^s Lay. 

Graham's Magazine, January, 1855, v. 46, p. 72. 

HaUeck's "Alnwick Castle." 

Broadway Journal, May 3, 1844. 

Happiness. 

Atlantic Monthly, April, 1858, v. 1, p. 685. 

Happy Martyrdom, The. 
The Liberty BeU, 1845. 

Harvard Anniversary. 

Address in Sanders Theatre, November 8, 1886. 
Democracy and Other Addresses, 1886. 

Haven, The. 
Poems, 1844. 

[Hawthorne's "Historical Tales for Youth."] 
The Pioneer, January, 1843. 

Hawthorne's "The Marble Faun." 

Atlantic Monthly, April, 1860, v. 5, p. 509. 

Hazlitt's "Library of Old Authors." 

North American Review, April, 1870, v. 110, p. 444. 

Hazlitt's "Poems of Richard Lovelace." 

North American Review, July, 1864, v. 99, p. 310. 

Heartsease and Rue. 
Boston, 1888. 

Hehe. 

The Young American, May, 1847, v. 1, p. 143. 
Poems, second series, 1848. 
[Miscellaneous Poems, 1877.] 



[27] 

Heritage, The, 
Poems, 1844. 
[Earlier Poems, 1877.] 

His Ship, 

Harper's Magazine, December, 1891, v. 84, p. 141. 

History and Description of New England (Coolidge and 
Mansfield). 
Atlantic Monthly, November, 1859, v. 4, p. 645. 

Hob Gobling's Song, 

Our Young Folks, January, 1867. 
Home Ballads and Poems. [Whittier.] 

Atlantic Monthly, November, 1860, v. 6, p. 637. 
Homeric Translation in Theory and Practice. [Newman.] 

Atlantic Monthly, January, 1862, v. 9, p. 142, 

''Hope first the gentle Poet leads," 

A Year's Life, 1841. [Preface.] 
Hosea and the Recruiting Sergeant. 

American Anti-Slavery Almanac for 1847, New York, 1846. 

Biglow Papers, first series, i. 

Howe's "Trip to Cuba." 

Atlantic Monthly, April, 1860, v. 5, p. 510. 

Howells's "Venetian Life." 

North American Review, October, 1866, v. 103, p. 611. 

How I Consulted the Oracle of the Goldfishes, 
Atlantic Monthly, August, 1889, v. 64, p. 145. 
Last Poems, 1895. 

''How oft do I live o'er." 

Poems, 1844. 
Humor, Wit, Fun and Satire. 

Century, November, 1893, v. 25 n. s., p. 125. 
Hunger and Cold, 

Poems, second series, 1848. 

[Miscellaneous Poems, 1877.] 



L 



]28] 

Hymn. 

Proceedings of the Anti-Slavery Meeting held in Stacy Hall, 
Boston, on the Twentieth Anniversary of the Mob of Octo- 
ber 21, 1835. Boston, published by R. F. Walcutt, 1855. 
lanthe. 

Southern Literary Messenger, July, 1840, v. 6, p. 545. 
A Year's Life, 1841. 

"Z ask not for those thoughts" 
Poems, 1844. 
[Earlier Poems, 1877.] 

"J cannot think that thou shouldst pass away." 
Poems, 1844. 
[Earlier Poems, 1877.] 

" I fain would give to thee" 

A Year's Life, 1841. 
"If some small savor creep into my rhymes" 

Graham's Magazine, February, 1842, v. 20, p. 90. 

"If ye have not the one great lesson learned." 
The Liberty Bell, 1842. 

"7 grieve not that ripe knowledge." 
Poems, 1844. 
[Earlier Poems, 1877.] 

"Z love those poets of whatever creed." 
Arcturus, May, 1842, p. 407. 

n Pesceballo. [By F. J. Child.] 

Translation by Lowell, Cambridge, 1862. 

Imaginary Conversation, An. 

Anti-Slavery Standard, May 18, 1848. 
Anti-Slavery Papers, 1902. 

Imagination, The. 

Century, March, 1894, v. 25 n. s., p. 716. 

Impartiality. 

A Year's Life, 1841. 



[29] 

Impatience and Reproof. 

Poems, 1844. 
Impressions of Spain. 

Diplomatic correspondence, 1878. House of Representatives, 

45th Congress, 3d Session, Executive Documents, v. i. 
Century, "Lowell's Impressions of Spain," November, 1898, 

V. 57, p. 140. 
Critic, "Mr. Lowell in Spain," September, 1898, v. 33, p. 171. 
Impressions of Spain, edited by Joseph B. Gilder, Boston, 
1899. 

In Absence. 

Poems, 1844. 
[Earlier Poems, 1877.] 

In a Copy of ''Among My Books." 

Atlantic Monthly, December, 1890, v. 86, p. 721. 
In a Copy of ''Fireside Travels." 

Atlantic Monthly, December, 1890, v. 86, p. 721. 
In a Copy of Omar Khayyam. 

Heartsease and Rue, 1888. 
In a Copy of Shakespeare. 

Century, November, 1899, v. 59, p. 49. 
In a Gift Copy of LowelVs Poems. 

Atlantic Monthly, December, 1890, v. 86, p. 721. 
In an Album. 

Heartsease and Rue, 1888. 
In a Volume of Sir Thomas Browne. 

Atlantic Monthly, July, 1890, v. 86, p. 63. 
Incident in a Railroad Car, An. 

Democratic Review, October, 1842, v. 11, p. 431. 

Poems, 1844. 

Poetry of the Bells, Cambridge, 1858. 

[Miscellaneous Poems, 1877.] 

Incident of the Fire at Hamburg, An. 

Graham's Magazine, May, 1845, v. 27, p. 205. 
Poems, second series, 1848. 
[Miscellaneous Poems, 1877.] 



[30] 

Index to Catalogue of Boston City Library. 
Atlantic Monthly, June, 1859, v. 3, p. 777. 

Indian-Summer Reverie^ An. 
Poems, second series, 1848. 
[Miscellaneous Poems, 1877.] 

In-doors and Out 

Putnam's Monthly, March, 1855, v. 5, p. 287. 

Infant Prodigy, The. 

The Nation, May 1, 1890, v. 50, p. 347. 

In Imitation of Burns. 

Harvardiana, 1837, p. 31. 

In Sadness. 

Graham's Magazine, August, 1843, v. 23, p. 110. 
Poems, 1844. 

Inscription for a Memorial Bust of Fielding. 

Atlantic Monthly, September, 1890, v. 66, p. 322. 

Inscriptions. 

Heartsease and Rue, 1888. 

International Copyright. 

Century, February, 1886, v. 31, p. 627. 
Heartsease and Rue, 1888. 

Interview with Miles Standish, An. 
Boston Courier, December 30, 1845. 
Poems, second series, 1848. 
[Miscellaneous Poems, 1877.] 

In the Half-Way House. 

Atlantic Monthly, January, 1863, v. 11, p. 26. 
Heartsease and Rue, 1888. 

In the Mediterranean. 

Leaves from my Journal, ii. Fireside Travels. 
In the Twilight. 

Atlantic Monthly, January, 1868, v. 21, p. 96. 

Under the Willows and Other Poems, 1868. 



[31] 

Introduction to Whittier's " Texas : Voice of New Eng- 
land." 
Boston Courier, April 17, 1844. 

Invita Minerva. 

The Crayon, May 80, 1855, v. 1, p. 346. 
Under the Willows and Other Poems, 1868. 

Invitation to J[ohn] F[rancis] H[eath], An. 

Graham's Magazine, December, 1850, v. 37, p. 360. 
Under the Willows and Other Poems, 1868. 

Irene. 

A Year's Life, 1841. 
[Earlier Poems, 1877.] 

Irish and American Patriots. 

Anti-Slavery Standard, November 30, 1848. 
Anti-Slavery Papers, 1902. 

Irish RebeUion, The. 

Anti-Slavery Standard, August 24, 1848. 
Anti-Slavery Papers, 1902. 

Isabel. 

Southern Literary Messenger, June, 1840, v. 6, p. 468. 
A Year's Life, 1841. 

"/ saw a gate." 

A Year's Life, 1841. 

Italy. 

Leaves from my Journal, iii. Fireside Travels. 

Italy, 1859. 

Atlantic Monthly, December, 1859, v. 4, p. 738. 

Under the Willows and Other Poems, 1868. [Villa Franca.] 

James's "Sketches." 

The Nation, June 17, 1875, v. 20, p. 425. 

Jeffries Wyman. Died September 4, 157^. 
The Nation, October 8, 1874, v. 19, p. 234. 
Heartsease and Rue, 1888. 



[32] 

Jonathan to John, 

Biglow Papers, second series, ii. 
Joseph Winloch, Died June 11, 1875. 

The Nation, June 17, 1875, v. 20, p. 405. 

Heartsease and Rue, 1888. 

Judd's "Philo." 

Anti-Slavery Standard, January 24, 1850. 

July reviewed by September [with W. B. Rogers]. 
Atlantic Monthly, September, 1860, v. 6, p. 378. ' 

June Idyll, A, 

Atlantic Monthly, June, 1868, v. 21, p. 754. 
Under the Willows and Other Poems, 1868. [Under the 
Willows.] 

Keats. 

Introduction to Keats's Poems, Little, Brown & Co., Boston, 

1854. 
Among My Books, second series, 1876. 

Kettelopotomachia. 

Biglow Papers, second series, vm. 

King Retro, 

Anti-Slavery Standard, May 10, 1849. 

Landlord, The. 

The People's Journal, September 4, 1847, v. 4, p. 135. 
Poems, V. 2, 1848. 
[Miscellaneous Poems, 1877.] 

Last Poems. 

Boston, 1895. 

Late Mrs. Ann Benson Proctor, The. 

The Nation, March 29, 1888, v. 46, p. 255. 

Latest Literary Essays and Addresses. 
Boston, 1891. 

Latest Views of Mr. Biglow. 

Atlantic Monthly, February, 1863, v. 11, p. 260. 
Biglow Papers, second series, vii. 



[33] 

Leaves from my Journal in Italy and Elsewhere. 
Graham's Monthly, April, May, June, 1854. 
Fireside Travels, 1864. 

Leaving the Matter O'pen, a Tale of Homer Wilbur, A.M. 
Anti-Slavery Standard, July 27, 1848. 
Biglow Papers, first series, Introduction. 

Lectures on the Science of Language. [Muller.] 
Atlantic Monthly, January, 1862, v. 9, p. 140. 

Legend of Brittany, A. 
Poems, 1844. 
pVliscellaneous Poems, 1877.] 

VEnvoi. 

Poems, 1844. 
[Earlier Poems, 1877.] 

L'Envoi. To the Muse. 

Atlantic Monthly, March, 1860, v. 5, p. 310. 
Under the Willows and Other Poems, 1868. 

Leslie's Autobiographical Recollections. 

Atlantic Monthly, September, 1860, v. 6, p. 373. 

Lessing. 

North American Review, April, 1867, v. 104, p. 541. 
Among My Books, first series, 1870. 

Lesson, The. 

Heartsease and Rue, 1888. 

Lesson of the Pine, The. 

Anti-Slavery Standard, November 15, 1849. 

Under the Willows and Other Poems, 1868. [A Mood.] 

Letter from a Candidate for the Presidency, A. 
Anti-Slavery Standard, June 1, 1848. 
Biglow Papers, first series, vii. 

Letter from a Volunteer in Saltillo. 
Boston Courier, August 18, 1847. 
Biglow Papers, first series, ii. 



[34] 

Letter from Boston. December, 1846. 
Anti-Slavery Standard, January 2, 1848. 
Atlantic Monthly, April, 1884, v. 53, p. 576. 
Riverside Ed., v. 1, 1890. 

Letter from Mr, Ezekiel Biglow of Jaalam to the Hon. 
Joseph T. Buckingham, A. 
Boston Courier, June 17, 1846. 
Biglow Papers, first series, i. 

Letter to my dear Sarah, A very Pleasant. 
Printed on Cardboard, n. d. 

Letters. 

New York, 1894. 

Two volumes. 
Library of Old Authors. 

Atlantic Monthly, April, May, 1858, v. 1, pp. 760, 883. 

My Study Windows, 1871. 

Life and Letters of Percival. 

North American Review, January, 1867, v. 104, p. 278. 
My Study Windows, 1871. 

Life of Andrew Jackson. [Parton.] 

Atlantic Monthly, March, 1861, v. 7, p. 381. 

*' Light of mine eyes.'* 
A Year's Life, 1841. 

"Like some black mountain glooming huge aloof" 

Boston Miscellany, February, 1842, v. 1, p. 54. 
Lines on the Death of Charles Turner Torrey. 

Boston Courier, May 23, 1846. 

Poems, second series, 1848. 

[Memorial Poems, 1877.] 

Lines suggested by the Graves of Two English Soldiers on 
Concord Battle-Ground. 
Anti-Slavery Standard, March 29, 1849. 
Poems, V. 2, 1849. 
[Miscellaneous Poems, 1877.] 

Longfellow's "Courtship of Miles Standish." 
Atlantic Monthly, January, 1859, v. 3, p. 129. 



[35] 

Longfellow's "Kavanagh:" Nationality in Literature. 

North American Review, July, 1849. 
Longfellow's "Poems on Slavery." 

The Pioneer, February, 1843. 

Longfellow's "Tales of a Wayside Inn." 

North American Review, January, 1864, v. 98, p. 289. 

Longing. 

Poems, second series, 1848. 
pSliscellaneous Poems, 1877.] 

Look Before and After, A. 

North American Review, January, 1869, v. 108, p. 9,55. 
[Lowell's from p. 260.] 

Lord Derby's Translation of the Iliad. 

North American Review, July, 1865, v. 101, p. 303. 
Lost Child, The. 

A Year's Life, 1841. 

Love. "True love is but a humble, low-born thing." 
Poems, 1844. 
[Earlier Poems, 1877.] 

Love and Thought. 

Last Poems, 1895. 
Loved One, The. 

Anti-Slavery Standard, December 16, 1841. 
Love-Dream, A. 

A Year's Life, 1841. 
Lover, The. 

A Year's Life, 1841. 
Love''s Altar. 

A Year's Life, 1841. 
Loves and Heroines of the Poets. 

Atlantic Monthly, December, 1860, v. 6, p. 761. 

Lovers Clock. A Pastoral. 
Heartsease and Rue, 1888. 



[36] 

Love-Song. 

A Year's Life, 1841. 
LowelFs "Fresh Hearts that failed Three Thousand 
Years ago." 

Atlantic Monthly, June, 1860, v. 5, p. 759. 
Lowell's Letters to Poe. 

Scribner's Magazine, August, 1894, v. 16, p. 170. 

Lyrics of a Day. 

North American Review, July, 1864, v. 99, p. 320. 

Macaulay's *' Lays of Ancient Rome." 

The Pioneer, February, 1843. 
Mahmood the Image-Breaker. 

Anti-Slavery Standard, April 18, 1850. 

Under the Willows and Other Poems, 1868. 

Maple, The. 

Atlantic Monthly, November, 1857, v. 1, p. 120. 
Heartsease and Rue, 1888. 

Marlowe. 

Harper's Magazine, July, 1892, v. 85, p. 194. 
The Old English Dramatists, 1892. 

Married Men: by One who knows them. 
Boston Miscellany, August, 1842, v. 2, p. 116. 
Early Prose Writings, 1902. 

Marsh's Lectures on the English Language. 

Atlantic Monthly, April, 1860, v. 5, p. 508. 
Marsh's "Man and Nature." 

North American Review, July, 1864, v. 99, p. 319. 
Mary. [Sonnets on Names.] 

A Year's Life, 1841. 

Masaccio. In the Brancacci Chapel. 

Knickerbocker Gallery; a Testimonial to the Editor of the 

Knickerbocker Magazine from its Contributors. New York, 

Samuel Hueston, 1855. 
Under the Willows and Other Poems, 1868. 



h 



[37] 

Mason and Slidell; a Yankee Idyll, 

Atlantic Monthly, February, 1862, v. 9, p. 259. 
Reprint, Boston, 1862, 12 pp. 8vo. 
Biglow Papers, second series, ii. 

Massinger and Ford. 

Harper's Magazine, November, 1892, v. 85, p. 942. 
The Old English Dramatists, 1892. 

Masson's "Life of John Milton." 

North American Review, January, 1872, v. 114, p. 214. 
Among my Books, second series, 1876. 

McClellan or Lincoln ? 

North American Review, October, 1864, v. 99, p. 557. 

[The Next General Election.] 
Political Essays, 1888. 

Meliboeus-Hipponax: The Biglow Papers. 
Boston, 1848, 1867. 

Memoir of Theophilus Parsons, by his Son. 

Atlantic Monthly, July, 1859, v. 4, p. 132. 
Memoriae Positum. R. G. Shaw, 

Atlantic Monthly, January, 1864, v. 13, p. 88. 

Under the Willows and Other Poems, 1868. 

Memorial Verses. 

Group selected from previous editions and added to Poetical 
Works, 1858. 

Mercedes, 26th June, 1878, 

Harper's Magazine, January, 1881, v. 62, p. 250. 
Merry England. 

Graham's Magazine, November, 1841, v. 19, p. 238. 
Message of Jeff Davis in Secret Session, A, 

Atlantic Monthly, April, 1862, v. 9, p. 512. 

Biglow Papers, second series, iv. 

Midnight. 

Poems, 1844. 
[Earlier Poems, 1877.] 



[38] 

Mill, The, 

Anti-Slavery Standard, January 4, 1849. 

Poems, V. 2, 1849. [Beaver Brook.] 
Milton. 

Among My Books, second series, 1876. 

Milton's "Areopagitica." 

Latest Literary Essays and Addresses, 1891. 
Miner, The. 

Atlantic Monthly, August, 1866, v. 18, p. 158. 

Under the Willows and Other Poems, 1868. 

Miscellaneous Poems. 

Group first appearing in complete Poetical Works, 1877. 
Misconception, A. 

The Nation, August 10, 1876, v. 23, p. 86. 

Heartsease and Rue, 1888. 

Miss Gilbert's Career. [Holland.] 

Atlantic Monthly, January, 1861, v. 7, p. 125. 
Mobs. 

Anti-Slavery Standard, June 14, 1849. 

Anti-Slavery Papers, 1902. 
Moderation. 

Anti-Slavery Standard, August 9, 1849. 

Anti-Slavery Papers, 1902. 
Moieties, [Campaign Epigrams.] 

The Nation, October 12, 1876, v. 23, p. 224. 
Monna Lisa. 

Heartsease and Rue, 1888. 
Mood, A. 

Anti-Slavery Standard, November 15, 1849. [The Lesson 
of the Pine.] 

Under the Willows and Other Poems, 1868. 
Moon, The. 

Graham's Magazine, February, 1843, v. 22, p. 102. 

Poems, 1844. 

[Earlier Poems, 1877.] 



[39] 

Moosehead Journal, A. [Addressed to the Edelmann 
Storg at the Bagni di Lucca.] 
Putnam's Monthly, November, 1853, v. 2, p. 457. 
Fireside Travels, 1864. 

Moral Movement against Slavery, The. 
Anti-Slavery Standard, February 22, 1849. 
Anti-Slavery Papers, 1902. 

Motley (a Note). 

The Nation, June 7, 1877, v. 24, p. 337. 
Mr. Bowen and the Christian Examiner. 

Boston Daily Advertiser, December 28, 1850, January 2, 
1851. 

Mr. Buchanan's Administration. 

Atlantic Monthly, April, 1858, v. 1, p. 754. [Lowell's from 
middle of first column on p. 754.] 

Mr. Calhoun's Report. 

Anti-Slavery Standard, February 15, 1849. 
Anti-Slavery Papers, 1902. 

Mr. Clay as an Abohtionist. Second appearance in Fifty 
Years. 
Anti-Slavery Standard, March 22, 1849. 
Anti-Slavery Papers, 1902. 

Mr. Emerson's New Course of Lectures. 
The Nation, November 12, v. 7, p. 389. 
My Study Windows, 1871. [Emerson, the Lecturer.] 

Mr. Hosea Biglow's Speech in March Meeting, 
Atlantic Monthly, May, 1866, v. 17, p. 635. 
Biglow Papers, second series, xi. 

Mr. Hosea Biglow to the Editor of the ''Atlantic Monthly.'' 
Atlantic Monthly, April, 1865, v. 15, p. 501. 
Biglow Papers, second series, x. 

Mr. Jarves's Collection. 

Atlantic Monthly, 1860, v. 6, p. 509. 



[40] 

Mr. Webster's Speech. 

Anti-Slavery Standard, March 21, 1850. 
Anti-Slavery Papers, 1902. 

Mr. Worsley^s Nightmare. 

The Nation, April 5, 1866, v. 2, p. 426. 

''Much have I mused." 
A Year's Life, 1841. 

Music. 

Southern Literary Messenger, May, 1840, v. 6, p. S32. 
A Year's Life, 1841. 

My Afpledore Gallery. No. I. August Afternoon.. 
The Crayon, January, 1855, v. 1, p. 9. 

My Appledore Gallery. No. II. Sunset and Moonset. 
The Crayon, January 31, 1855, v. 1, p. 73. 
Under the Willows and Other Poems, 1868. [Pictures from 
Appledore.] 

My Brook. 

New York Ledger, December 13, 1890. Supplement. 

My Diary, North and South. [Russell.] 

Atlantic Monthly, March, 1863, v. 11, p. 391. 

*' My Father, since I love, thy presence cries." 
Arcturus, May, 1842. 

** My Friend, adown life's valley." 
A Year's Life, 1841. 

" My Friend, I pray thee call not this society." 

Southern Literary Messenger, March, 1840, v. 6, p. 229. 
A Year's Life, 1841. [Disappointment.] 

My Garden Acquaintance. 
My Study Windows, 1871. 

" My heart, I cannot still it." 

A Masque of Poets, Boston, 1878. 
Heartsease and Rue, 1888. [Auspex.] 



[41] 

My Lost Youth, 

Putnam's Monthly, August, 1855, v. 6, p. 122. 

My Love, 

A Year's Life, 1841. 
[Earlier Poems, 1877.] 

*' My Love, I have no fear that thou shouldst die.'^ 
Poems, 1844. 
[Earlier Poems, 1877.] 

My Portrait Gallery. 

Atlantic Monthly, December, 1857, v. 1, p. 249. 

Mystical Ballad, A. 

Graham's Magazine, May, 1844, v. 25, p. 214. 

My Study Windows. 
Boston, 1871. 

Nationality in Literature. 

North American Review, July, 1849, v. 69, p. 196. 

Nest, The, 

Atlantic Monthly, March, 1858, v. 1, p. 523. 
Heartsease and Rue, 1888. 

New and the Old, The. [Palmer.] 

Atlantic Monthly, September, 1859, v. 4, p. 383. 

New England Two Centuries Ago. 

North American Review, January, 1865, v. 100, p. 161. 
Reprinted as 8vo pamphlet, 1865. 
Among My Books, 1870. 

News from Paris, The. 

Anti-Slavery Standard, July 20, 1848. 
Anti-Slavery Papers, 1902. 

New Tariff Bill, The. 

Atlantic Monthly, July, 1860, v. 6, p. 124. 

New Timon, The. 

North American Review, April, 1847, v. 64, p. 460. 



[42] 

New Translations of the Writings of Miss Bremer. 

North American Review, April, 1844, v. 58, p. 480. 
New Yearns Eve, 18^. A Fragment, 

Graham's Magazine, July, 1844, v. 26, p. 15. 

New Year's Eve, 1850, 

Anti-Slavery Standard, January 10, 1850. 
Under the Willows and Other Poems, 1868. 

New Year's Greeting, The, 

Heartsease and E,ue, 1888. 
Next General Election, The. 

North American Review, October, 1864, v. 99, p. 557. 

Political Essays, 1888. [McClellan or Lincoln ?] 

Nightingale in the Study, The, 

Atlantic Monthly, September, 1867, v. 20, p. 823. 
Under the Willows and Other Poems, 1868. 

Nightwatches. 

Atlantic Monthly, July, 1877, v. 40, p. 93. 
Heartsease and Rue, 1888. 

Nobler Lover, The. 

Last Poems, 1895. 
Nomades, The. 

Under the Willows and Other Poems, 1868. 

Nominations for the Presidency, The. 
Anti-Slavery Standard, June 22, 1848. 
Anti-Slavery Papers, 1902. 

** No more but so ? " 
A Year's Life, 1841. 

Northern Sancho Panza and his Vicarious Cork Tree, The, 
National Anti-Slavery Standard, July 18, 1850. 

Notes of Travel and Study in Italy. [Norton.] 
Atlantic Monthly, May, 1860, v. 5, p. 629. 

'* Now is always best.** 

Broadway Journal, January 25, 1845, p. 58. 



[43] 

Oak, The. 

Anti-Slavery Standard, December 31, 1846. 
Poems, second series, 1848. 
[Miscellaneous Poems, 1877.] 

"O, child of Nature y O most meek and free," 

Southern Literary Messenger, June, 1840, v. 6, p. 470. 

A Year's Life, 1841. 
Ode. ''In the old days of awe and keen-eyed wonder." 

Boston Miscellany, February, 1842, v. 1, p. 59. 

Poems, 1844. 

[Earlier Poems, 1877.] 

Ode for the Fourth of July, 1876, An. 

Atlantic Monthly, December, 1876, v. 38, p. 740. 
Three Memorial Poems, 1877. 

Ode read at the One Hundredth Anniversary of the Fight at 
Concord Bridge, 19th April, 1875. 
Atlantic Monthly, June, 1875, v. 35, p. 730. 
Three Memorial Poems, 1876. 

Ode recited at the Harvard Commemoration, July 21, 1865. 
Cambridge, privately printed, 1865. Royal 8vo, boards, 

paper label on front cover, gilt top, 50 copies printed for 

Lowell's use. 

Dedication: ** To the ever sweet and shining memory of 

the ninety-three sons of Harvard College who have died for 

their couatry in the war of nationality." 
Atlantic Monthly, September, 1865, v. 16, p. 364. 
Harvard Memorial Biographies, v. 1, 1866. 
Under the Willows and Other Poems, 1868. 
Three Memorial Poems, 1876. 

Ode to France. February, 18Ji,8. 

Anti-Slavery Standard, April 6, 1848. 
Poems, V. 2, 1849. 
[Miscellaneous Poems, 1877.] 

Ode to Happiness. 

Atlantic Monthly, September, 1861, v. 8, p. 365. 
Under the Willows and Other Poems, 1868. 



[44] 

Ode, {Written for the Celebration of the Introduction of 
the Cochituate Water into the City of Boston.] 
Celebration of the Introduction of the Water of Cochituate 
Lake into the City of Boston. Boston, City Printer, 1848. 
[Sung by school-children.] 
Poems, V. 2, 1849. 
[Miscellaneous Poems, 1877.] 

"0 happy childhood." 

Poems, 1844. 
Old English Dramatists, The. 

Boston Miscellany, April, May, August, 1842, v. 1, pp. 145, 
201, V. 2, p. 49. 

Early Prose Writings, 1902. 

Old Enghsh Dramatists, The. 

Harper's Magazine, June, 1892, v. 85, p. 75. [Introductory 

lecture.] 
The Old Enghsh Dramatists, 1892. 
Latest Literary Essays [added to]. Elmwood Edition. 

Old English Dramatists, The. 
Boston, 1892. 

Old Poets, The. 

Graham's Magazine, February, 1842, p. 90. 

Olmstead's **A Journey in the Back Country." 

Atlantic Monthly, November, 1860. 
On a Bust of General Grant. 

Scribner's Magazine, March, 1892, v. 11, p. 267. 

Last Poems, 1895. 

On a Certain Condescension in Foreigners. 
Atlantic Monthly, January, 1869, v. 23, p. 82, 
My Study Windows, 1871. 

On a Portrait of Dante by Giotto. 
Poems, second series, 1848. 
[Miscellaneous Poems, 1877.] 

On an Autumn Sketch of H. G. Wild. 
Heartsease and Rue, 1888. 



[45] 

On being asked for an Autograph in Venice, 

Atlantic Monthly, July, 1875, v. 36, p. 37. 

Heartsease and Rue, 1888. 
On Board the '76. [Written for Mr, Bryant's Seventieth 
Birthday, November 3, 186 Ji..'] 

Atlantic Monthly, January, 1865, v. 15, p. 107. 

Under the Willows and Other Poems, 1868. 

On Burning some Old Letters, 

Heartsease and Rue, 1888. 
One Great Lesson, The. 

The Liberty Bell, 1842. [No. ii of "Sonnets.'*] 
On Hearing a Sonata of Beethoven's played in the Next 
Room. 

Last Poems, 1895. 
" Only as thou herein canst not see me." 

The Dial, January, 1842, p. 357. 
*' Only full obedience is free." 

Anti-Slavery Standard, January 27, 1842. 
On my Twenty-fourth Birth-day, February 22, 18Jt3, 

Poems, 1844. 

On Planting a Tree at Inveraray. 

Heartsease and Rue, 1888. 
On reading Spenser again, 

A Year's Life, 1841. 

On reading Wordsworth's Sonnets in Defence of Capital 
Punishment. 
Democratic Review, May, 1842, v. 10, p. 479. 
Poems, 1844. 
[Earlier Poems, 1877.] 

On receiving a Copy of Mr. Austin Dobson's ** Old World 
Idylls." 

Heartsease and Rue, 1888. 
On receiving a Piece of Flax-cotton, 

Anti-Slavery Standard, May 1, 1851. 



[46] 

On the Capture of certain Fugitive Slaves near Wash- 
ington. 
Boston Courier, July 19, 1845. 
Poems, second series, 1848. 
[Miscellaneous Poems, 1877.] 

On the Death of a Friend's Child. 

Democratic Review, October, 1844, v. 15, p. 377. 
Poems, second series, 1848. 
[Miscellaneous Poems, 1877.] 

On the Death of Charles Turner Torrey. 
Poems, second series, 1848. 
[Memorial Verses, 1877.] 

On Translating Homer. [Arnold.] 

Atlantic Monthly, January, 1862, v. 9, p. 142. 

Optimist, The. 

Heartsease and Rue, 1888. 

Oriental Apologue, An. 

Anti-Slavery Standard, April 12, 1849. 
Poetical Works, 1877. 

Origin of Didactic Poetry, The. 

Atlantic Monthly, November, 1857, v. 1, p. 110. 
Heartsease and Rue, 1888. 

Orpheus. 

The American Review, August, 1845, v. 2, p. 131. 

" Our Literature." 

Literary and Political Addresses, 1904. 

"Our love is not a fading earthly flower." 
Poems, 1844. 
[Earlier Poems, 1877.] 

Our Own : His Wanderings and Adventures. 

Putnam's Monthly, April, May, June, 1853, v. 1, pp. 406, 
533, 687. 



[47] 

Our Position. 

Pennsylvania Freeman, January 16, 1844. 

Our Southern Brethren. 

Anti-Slavery Standard, January, 1849. 
Anti-Slavery Papers, 1902. 

Out of Doors. 

Graham's Magazine, April, 1850, v. 36, p. 257. 
Palfrey's "History of New England." 

North American Review, January, 1865, v. 100, p. 161. 

Palinode. [Autumn.] 

Putnam's Monthly, December, 1854, v. 4, p. 570. 
Second part of "Auf Wiedersehen." 
Under the Willows and Other Poems, 1868. 

Palmer's "Folk-Songs." 

Atlantic Monthly, December, 1860, v. 6, p. 761. 

Pahner's **The New and the Old." 
Atlantic Monthly, September, 1859. 

Paola to Francesca. 

Heartsease and Rue, 1888. 

Parable, A. 

Heartsease and Rue, 1888. 

Parable, A. " Said Christ our Lord." 
Anti-Slavery Standard, May 18, 1848. 
Poems, V. 2, 1849. 
[Miscellaneous Poems, 1877.] 

Parable, A. " Worn and foot-sore was the prophet.'' 
Democratic Review, February, 1843, v. 12, p. 145. 
Poems, 1844. 
[Earlier Poems, 1877.] 

Parkman's "France and England." 

North American Review, October, 1865, v. 101, p. 625. 

Parkman's *' France and England in North America." 
North American Review, July, 1867, v. 105, p. 321. 



[48] 

Parting of the Ways, The, 

Anti-Slavery Standard, February 8, 1848. 
Under the Willows and Other Poems, 1868. 

Peck's "Forty Years of Pioneer Life." 

North American Review, October, 1864, v. 99, p. 627. 
Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, The. 

Broadway Journal, February 22, 1845. 
Peschiera. 

Putnam's Monthly, May, 1854, v. 2, p. 522. 
Pessimoptimism, 

Heartsease and Rue, 1888. 
Petition, The. 

Heartsease and Rue, 1888. 
Phoebe. 

Century, November, 1881, v. 23, p. 90. 

Heartsease and Rue, 1888. 

Pickens-and-Stealin's Rebellion, The. 

Atlantic Monthly, June, 1861, v. 7, p. 757. 
PoHtical Essays, 1888. ^ 

Pictures from Appledore. 

i-iv, August Afternoon, The Crayon, January 3, 1855. 

V, Appledore, Graham's Magazine, February, 1851, v. 37, 
p. 87. 

VI, Sunset and Moonset, The Crayon, January 31, 1855. 
Under the Willows and Other Poems, 1868. 

Pioneer, The. 

Poems, second series, 1848. 
[Miscellaneous Poems, 1877.] 

Pious Editor's Creed, The. 

Anti-Slavery Standard, May 4, 1848. 
Biglow Papers, first series, vi. 

Place of the Independent in Politics, The. 

Address to Reform Club, New York, April 13, 1888. 
Reform Club Series, No. I, New York, Reform Club, 1888. 
PoUtical Essays, 1888. 



[49] 

Plays of Thomas Middleton, The. 
The Pioneer, January, 1843. 
Early Prose Writings, 1902. 

Plea for Freedom from Speech and Figures of Speech- 
Makers, A. 
Atlantic Monthly, December, 1860, v. 6, p. 740. 

Pocket Celebration of the Fourth, The. 

Atlantic Monthly, August, 1858, v. 2, p. 374. 

Poems. [Rose Terry.] 

Atlantic Monthly, March, 1861, v. 7, p. 382. 

Poems by John James Piatt. 

North American Review, October, 1868, v. 101, p. 660. 
Poems by Two Friends. 

Atlantic Monthly, April, 1860, v. 5, p. 510. 

Poems of Robert Lowell, The. 

North American Review, April, 1864, v. 98, p. 617. 

Poems of the Wak. 

Under the Willows and Other Poems, 1868. 
[Poetical Works, 1877.] 

PoeU The. 

A Year's Life, 1841. 

Poet, The. 

Arcturus, February, 1842, p. 201. 
Poems, 1844. 

"Poet, if men from wisdom turn away." 
Anti-Slavery Standard, September 1, 1842. 

"Poet, who sittest in thy pleasant room." 
A Year's Life, 1841. 

Political Essays. 
Boston, 1888. 

Politics and the Pulpit. 

Anti-Slavery Standard, January 25, 1849. 
Anti-Slavery Papers, 1902. 



I 



[50] 

Pope. 

North American Keview, January, 1871, v. 112, p. 178. 
My Study Windows, 1871. 

Power of Sound, The: A Rhymed Lecture. 
Privately printed. New York, 1896. 

Prayer, A, 

Poems, 1844. 
[Earlier Poems, 1877.] 

Pregnant Comment, The. 
Heartsease and Rue, 1888. 

Prejudice of Color, The. 

Pennsylvania Freeman, February 13, 1845. 
Anti-Slavery Papers, 1902. 

Present Crisis, The, [December, 1844.] 

Boston Courier, December 11, 1845. [Verses suggested by 

the Present Crisis.] 
Poems, second series, 1848. 
[Miscellaneous Poems, 1877.] 

President on the Stump, The. 

North American Review, April, 1866, v. 102, p. 530. 
PoUtical Essays, 1888. 

Presidential Candidates. 

Anti-Slavery Standard, May 11, 1848. 
Anti-Slavery Papers, 1902. 

President's Message, The. 

Anti-Slavery Standard, December 14, 1848. 
Anti-Slavery Papers, 1902. 

President's PoHcy, The. 

North American Review, January, 1864, v. 98, p. 234. 

President Tyler's Message on the African Slave Trade. 
Pennsylvania Freeman, March 13, 1844. 

Prior's "Ancient Danish Ballads." 

Atlantic Monthly, January, 1861, v. 7, p. 124. 



[51] 

Prison of Cervantes, The. 

Harper's Magazine, January, 1881, v. 62, p. 250. 

Heartsease and Rue, 1888. 
Progress of the World, The. 

Introduction to The World's Progress, Boston, 1886. 

Latest Literary Essays, 1891. 
Prometheus, 

Democratic Review, August, 1843, v. 13, p. 147. 

Poems, 1844. 

pMiscellaneous Poems, 1877.] 
Pro-Slavery Logic. 

Anti-Slavery Standard, November 23, 1848. 

Anti-Slavery Papers, 1902. 
Protest, The. 

Heartsease and Rue, 1888. 
Pseudo-Conservatism. 

Anti-Slavery Standard, November 14, 1850. 

Anti-Slavery Papers, 1902. 
Public Opinion. 

Anti-Slavery Standard, May 10, 1849. 

Anti-Slavery Papers, 1902. 

Putting the Cart before the Horse. 

Anti-Slavery Standard, October 4, 1849. 
Anti-Slavery Papers, 1902. 

Question of the Hour, The. 

Atlantic Monthly, January, 1861, v. 7, p. 117. 

Rallying Cry for New England against the Annexation of 
Texas, by a Yankee, A. 
Boston Courier, March 19, 1844. 
Harper's Weekly, April 23, 1892, v. 36, p. 393. 

Reading. 

A Year's Life, 1841. 
Rebellion; its Causes and Consequences, The. 

North American Review, July, 1864, v. 99, p. 246. 

Pohtical Essays, 1888. 



[52] 

Recall, The. 

Heartsease and Rue, 1888. 

Reconstruction. 

North American Review, April, 1865, v. 100, p. 540. 
Political Essays, 1888. 

Red Tape. 

A Masque of Poets, Boston, 1878. 
Heartsease and Rue, 1888. [The Brakes.] 

Reform. 

Arcturus, February, 1842, p. 200. 
Poems, 1844. 

Reform. 

Poems, V. 1, 1849. 

Remarks of Increase D. O^Phace, Esq, 
Boston Courier, December 28, 1847. 
Biglow Papers, first series, rv. 

Remembered Music. A Fragment. 

Broadway Journal, February 15, 1844. 
Poems, second series, 1848. 
pEarUer Poems, 1877.] 

Reply to the "Statement of the Trustees" of the Dudley 
Observatory. 
Atlantic Monthly, November, 1859, v. 4, p. 650. 

Requiem, A. 

The Gift; a Christmas and New Year's Present, Philadelphia, 

1844. 
Poems, 1844. 
[EarKer Poems, 1877.] 

Restaurant, The. 

Putnam's Monthly, May, 1854, v. 3, p. 559. No. ii in 
"Without and Within." 

Reverie, A. 

Graham's Magazine, October, 1843, v. 24, p. 183 
Poems, 1844. 



[53] 

Review of the Works of John Webster. 

Atlantic Monthly, June, 1858, v. 2, p. 119. 
Rhoecus, 

Poems, 1844. 

pVliscellaneous Poems, 1877.] 
" Richard HI." 

Latest Literary Essays, 1891. 
Roba di Roma. [Story.] 

Atlantic Monthly, April, 1863, v. 11, p. 515. 
Roman RepubHc, The. 

Anti-Slavery Standard, July 12, 1849. 

Anti-Slavery Papers, 1902. 
Rosaline. 

Graham's Magazine, February, 1842, v. 20, p. 89. 

Poems, V. 1, 1849. 

[Earlier Poems, 1877.] 
Rose, [Sonnets on Names.] 

A Year's Life, 1841. 
Rose, The. 

The Pioneer, January, 1843. 
Rose, The: A Ballad. 

Poems, 1844. 

[EarHer Poems, 1877.] 
Round Table, The. 

Atlantic Monthly, November, 1857, v. 1, p. 121. 
Rousseau and the Sentimentalists. 

North American Review, July, 1867, v. 105, p. 242. 

Among My Books, first series, 1870. 

Royal Pedigree, The. 

Anti-Slavery Standard, August 20, 1846. 
Boston Courier, December 4, 1846. 
Poems, second series, 1848. 

Sacred Parasol, The. 

Anti-Slavery Standard, June 8, 1848. 
Anti-Slavery Papers, 1902. 



[54] 

St. Michael the Weigher, 

Last Poems, 1895. 
Sample of Consistency, A. 

Atlantic Monthly, November, 1858, v. 2, p. 750. 

Sapphire. 

The Ladies' Casket, Lowell, 1846. 
" Sayest thou, most heautifuL'* 

A Year's Life, 1841. 

Sayings. 

Heartsease and Rue, 1888. 
Scherzo. 

Heartsease and Rue, 1888. 
Science and Poetry. 

Heartsease and Rue, 1888. 
Scotch the Snake or EjU it? 

North American Review, July, 1865, v. 101, p. 190. 

Political Essays, 1888. 

Scottish Border. 

Atlantic Monthly, July, 1875, v. 36, p. 37. [Sonnets from 

Over Sea, i, EngUsh Border.] 
Heartsease and Rue, 1888. 

Search, The. 

Anti-Slavery Standard, February 25, 1847. 
Poems, second series, 1848. 
[Miscellaneous Poems, 1877.] 

Seaweed. 

Gifts of Genius; a Miscellany, 1859. 
Under the Willows and Other Poems, 1868. 

Second Letter from B. Sawin, Esq. 
Anti-Slavery Standard, July 6, 1848. 
Biglow Papers, first series, vin. 

Secret, The, 

Atlantic Monthly, January, 1888, v. 61, p. 95. 
Heartsease and Rue, 1888. 



[55] 

Self-Possession vs. Prepossession. 

Atlantic Monthly, December, 1861, v. 8, p. 761. 
Self-Study. 

Under the Willows and Other Poems, 1868. 
Serenade. " From the close-shut window gleams no spark." 

A Year's Life, 1841. 

Poems, V. 1, 1849. 

[Earlier Poems, 1877.] 

Serenade, The. " Gentle, Lady, be thy sleeping." 
Southern Literary Messenger, April, 1840, p. 248. 
A Year's Life, 1841. 

Seward-Johnson Reaction, The. 

North American Review, October, 1866, v. 103, p. 520. 
Political Essays, 1888. 

Shadow of Dante, The. 

North American Review, July, 1872, v. 115, p. 139. 
Among My Books, second series, 1876. [Dante.] 

Shakespeare Once More. 

North American Review, April, 1868, v. 106, p. 629. 
Among My Books, first series, 1870. 

Essays from the North American Review, edited by Allen 
Thorndike Rice. New York, Appletons, 1879. 

Shakespeare's "Richard III." 

Address before the Edinburgh Philosophical Listitution, 1883. 
Atlantic Monthly, December, 1891, v. 68, p. 816. 
Latest Literary Essays and Addresses, 1892. 
[Literary and Political Addresses, 1904.] 

Shall we ever be Republican ? 

Anti-Slavery Standard, April 20, 1848. 

Anti-Slavery Papers, 1902. 
She came and went. 

Poems, V. 2, 1849. 

[Miscellaneous Poems, 1877.] 
SheUey. 

Introduction to Poetical Works of Shelley, Boston, 1857. 



[56] 

Shepherd of King Admetus, The. 

Boston Miscellany, September, 1842, v. 2, p. 138. 
Poems, 1844. 
[Miscellaneous Poems, 1877.] 

Shipwreck. 

Atlantic Monthly, June, 1858, v. 2, p. 101. 
Si descendero in Infernum, odes. 

The Harbinger, January 16, 1847, v. 4, p. 94. 

Poems, second series, 1848. 

[Miscellaneous Poems, 1877.] 

Silence. 

Poems, 1844. 

'^Silent as one who treads. ^^ 
A Year's Life, 1841. 

Singing Leaves, The: A Ballad. 

Graham's Magazine, January, 1854. 
Under the Willows and Other Poems, 1868. 

Singing to the Eternal Ear. 

National Anti-Slavery Standard, September, 1842. 

"Sir Rohan's Ghost." 

Atlantic Monthly, February, 1860, v. 5, p. 252. 

Sirens, The. 

A Year's Life, 1841. 
[Earlier Poems, 1877.] 

Sixty-Eighth Birthday. 

Heartsease and Rue, 1888. 

Skilly goliana. 

Harvardiana, February, 1838, p. 196. . 

Slaveholding Territories. 

Anti-Slavery Standard, April 19, 1849. 
Anti-Slavery Papers, 1902. 

'* Slow opening flower." 
Poems, 1844. 



[57] 

Some Letters of Walter Savage Landor. 
Century, February, 1888, v. 35, p. 511. 
Latest Literary Essays, 1891. 

Something Natural. 
A Year's Life, 1841. 

Song, **A pair of Hack eyes.*' 
Harvardiaua, July, 1838, p. 389. 

Song. ''Lift up the curtains of thine eyes." 

Southern Literary Messenger, June, 1840, v. 6, p. 416. 
A Year's Life, 1841. 

Song. " O moonlight deep and tender." 
Poems, 1844. 
[Earlier Poems, 1877.] 

Song. '^Ohl I must look on that sweet face once more before 
I die." 
Southern Literary Messenger, June, 1840, p. 414. 
A Year's Life, 1841. 

Song. " There is a light in thy blue eyes." 
Poems, 1844. 

Song. To M. L. 

Poems, second series, 1848. 
[Earlier Poems, 1877.] 

Song to my Wife, A. 

Broadway Jom*nal, January 4, 1845. 

Song. " Violet I sweet violet." 
Poems, 1844. 
[Earlier Poems, 1877.] 

Song. " What reck I of the stars when I." 

Southern Literary Messenger, March, 1840, v. 6, p. 213. 
A Year's Life, 1841. 

Song-Writing. 

The Pioneer, February, 1843. 
Early Prose Writings, 1902. 



[58] 

Sonnet On being asked for an Autograph in Venice, 

Atlantic Monthly, July, 1875, v. 36, p. 37. [Sonnets from 

Over Sea, n.] 
Heartsease and Rue, 1888. 

Sonnet To Fanny Alexander. 

Atlantic Monthly, May, 1875, v. 35, p. 560. 
Heartsease and Rue, 1888. 

Sonnet to Keats, 

Boston Miscellany, January, 1842, v. 1, p. 3. 
Sonnets from Over Sea. 

Atlantic Monthly, July, 1875, v. 36, p. 37. 
Heartsease and Rue, 1888. [Scottish Border. On being asked 
for an Autograph in Venice.] 

Sonnets on Names. 
A Year's Life, 1841. 

South as King Log, The. 

Anti-Slavery Standard, February 21, 1850. 
Anti-Slavery Papers, 1902. 

Sower, The. 

Poems, V. 2, 1849. 
[Miscellaneous Poems, 1877.] 

Speech of Hon^^^ Preserved Doe in Secret Caucus. 
Atlantic Monthly, May, 1862, v. 9, p. 841. 
Biglow Papers, second series, v. 

Spenser. 

North American Review, April, 1875, v. 120, p. 334. 
Among My Books, second series, 1876. 

Sphinx. 

A Year's Life, 1841. 
Stanley. 

Speech in Westminster Abbey, December 13, 1881. 

Democracy and Other Addresses, 1886. 

Stanzas on Freedom. 

Poems, 1844. [Stanzas sung at the Anti-Slavery Picnic 



[59] 

in Dedham on the Anniversary of West-Indian Emanci- 
pation, August 1, 1843.] 
[Miscellaneous Poems, 1877.] 

Stedman's "Alice of Monmouth." 

North American Review, January, 1864, v. 98, p. 292. 

Street, The. 

The Pioneer, March, 1843. 
Poems, 1844. 
[Earlier Poems, 1877.] 

Studies for Two Heads. 

Poems, second series, 1848. 
[Miscellaneous Poems, 1877.] 

Study for a Head, 

The Young American's Magazine, July, 1847, v. 1, p. 268. 
Poems, second series, 1848. 

[Miscellaneous Poems, 1877.] [First part of "Studies for 
Two Heads."] 

Study of Modem Languages, The. 

Address before Modern Language Association, 1889. 
Latest Literary Essays and Addresses, 1891. 

Suh Pondere crescit. 
Arcturus, May, 1842. 
Poems, 1844. 
[Earlier Poems, 1877.] 

Summer Storm. 

Poems, second series, 1848. 
[Earlier Poems, 1877.] 

Sun-Worship. 

Heartsease and Rue, 1888. 

Sunset and Moonset. 

The Crayon, January 31, 1855. 
Pictures from Appledore, vi. 

Sunset and Moonshine. 

Arcturus, January, 1842, p. 141. 



[60] 

SunthirC in the Pastoral Line, 

Atlantic MontMy, June, 1862, v. 9, p. 790. 
Biglow Papers, second series, vi. 

Swinburne's Tragedies. 

North American Review, April, 1866, v. 102, p. 544. 
My Study Windows, 1871. 

Sympathy with Ireland. 

Anti-Slavery Standard, June 29, 1848. 
Anti-Slavery Papers, 1902. 

Tariff Reform. 

Address at Tariff Reform League, Boston, 1887. 
Literary and Political Addresses, 1904. 

Telepathy. 

Heartsease and Rue, 1888. 

Tempora Mutantur, 

The Nation, August 26, 1875, v. 21, p. 130. 
Heartsease and Rue, 1888. 

Ten Years of Preacher-Life. [Milbum.] 

Atlantic Monthly, December, 1859, v. 4, p. 770. 

Tennyson's "Enoch Arden." 

North American Review, October, 1864, v. 99, p. 6! 
Tennyson's " Princess." 

Massachusetts Quarterly Review, March, 1848. 

Texas. 

Pennsylvania Freeman, January 30, 1845. 
Anti-Slavery Papers, 1902. 

Thackeray's "Roundabout Papers." 

North American Review, April, 1864, v. 98, p. 624. 
Thankfulness. 

Poems, 1844. 
" The gentle Una I have loved. ^^ 

A Year's Life, 1841. [Dedication.] 



[61] 

" The hungry flame did never yet seem hot" 
The Liberty Bell, 1842. 
Poems, 1844. [The Fiery Trial.] 

" The Maple puts her corals on in May.'' 

Atlantic Monthly, November, 1857, v. 1, p. 120. 
Heartsease and Rue, 1888. [The Maple.] 

" The Soul would fain." 
A Year's Life, 1841. 

" There never yet was flower fair in vain." 
Poems, 1844. 
[Earlier Poems, 1877.] 

" Therefore think not the Past is wise alone." 
The Present, April 1, 1844, p. 425. 

Third Letter from B. Sawin, Esq., A. 
Biglow Papers, second series, ix. 

Thistle-downs. 

Poems, V. 1, 1849. 

Thoreau Letters. 

North American Review, October, 1865, v. 101, p. 397. 
My Study Windows, 1871. [Thoreau.] 

Thoreau's "Week." 

Massachusetts Quarterly Review, December, 1849, v. 3, 
p. 40. 

" Thou art a woman." 

Anti-Slavery Standard, February 3, 1842. 

Three Memorial Poems. 

Boston, 1877. 
Threnodia on an Infant. 

Knickerbocker Magazine, May, 1839. 

A Year's Life, 1841. [Threnodia.] 

[Earlier Poems, 1877.] 

To . 



A Year's Life, 1841. 



[62] 

To , after a Snow-storm. 

A Year's Life, 1841. ' 

To . " We, too, have autumns, when our leaves" 

Anti-Slavery Standard, October 18, 1849. 
Poems, V. 2, 1849. 
[Miscellaneous Poems, 1877.] 

To A.C. L. [Mrs. Anna Cabot Lowell.] 
Poems, 1844. 
[Earlier Poems, 1877.] 

To a Friend. 

A Year's Life, 1841. 

To a Friend who gave me a group of weeds and grasses. 
The Mercantile, Boston, March 21, 1875; in connection with 

Fair in aid of Mercantile Library Association. 
Heartsease and Rue, 1888. 

To a Friend who sent me a Meerschaum. 

Spirit of the Fair, New York, April 12, 1864, p. 79. [For 

"Metropolitan Fair" of Sanitary Commission.] 
Heartsease and Rue, 1888. [To C. F. Bradford.] 

To a Lady playing on the Cithern. 

Heartsease and Rue, 1888. 

To a Pine Tree. 

The Harbinger, August 2, 1845, v. 1, p. 122. 
Poems, second series, 1848. 
[Miscellaneous Poems, 1877.] 

To a Voice heard in Mount Auburn, July, 1839. 
The Dial, January, 1841, p. 366. 
A Year's Life, 1841. 

To an Molian Harp at Night. 

Boston Miscellany, December, 1842, v. 2, p. 267. 
To C. F. Bradford, on the Gift of a Meerschaum Pipe. 

Spirit of the Fair, April 12, 1864. 

Heartsease and Rue, 1888. 



[63] 

To Charles Eliot Norton. [Agro Dolce.] 
Under the Willows and Other Poems, 1868. 

To Cuba and Back. [Dana.] 

Atlantic Monthly, July, 1859, v. 4, p. 132. 

" To die is gain." 

The Dial, July, 1841, p. 129. 

To E. W. G. [E. W. Oilman.] 
A Year's Life, 1841. 

To Holmes on his Seventieth Birthday. 
Heartsease and Rue, 1888. 

To H. W. L., on his BiHhday, 27th February, 1867. 
Under the Willows and Other Poems, 1868. 

To Irene on her Birthday. 

The Dial, January, 1842, p. 358. 

To John Gorham Palfrey. 

Anti-Slavery Standard, November 2, 1848. 
Poems, V. 2, 1849. 
[Memorial Verses, 1858.] 

To J. R. Giddings. 
Poems, 1844. 
[Earlier Poems, 1877.] 

To Lamartine. 

Anti-Slavery Standard, August 3, 1848. 
Poems, V. 2, 1849. 
[Memorial Verses, 1858.] 

To Miss D. T. on her giving me a drawing of little Street 
Arabs. 
Heartsease and Rue, 1888. 
To M. O. S. 

The Pioneer, February, 1843. [To "Mary, since first 

I knew thee."] 
Poems, 1844. 
[Earlier Poems, 1877.] 



[64] 

To Mount Washington, on a Second Visit. 

Harvardiana, July, 1838, p. 387. 
To Mr. John Bartlett, who had sent me a seven-pound trout. 

Atlantic Monthly, July, 1866, v. 18, p. 47. 

With Bartlett's Catalogue of Books on Angling, Cambridge, 
1882; inserted. 

Under the Willows and Other Poems, 1868. 

To M. W., on her Birthday. 

Poems, 1844. [To , on her Birthday.] 

[Earlier Poems, 1877.] 
To Perdita, singing. 

Boston Miscellany, January, 1842, v. 1, p. 23. 

Poems, 1844. 

[Earlier Poems, 1877.] 
To the Dandelion. 

Graham's Magazine, January, 1845, v. 27, p. 4. 

Poems, second series, 1848. 

[Miscellaneous Poems, 1877.] 

" To the dark, narrow house." 

A Year's Life, 1841. 
To the Evening Star. 

A Year's Life, 1841. 
To the Future. 

Graham's Magazine, August, 1845, v. 28, p. 52. 

Poems, second series, 1848. 

[Miscellaneous Poems, 1877.] 
To the Memory of Hood. 

Anti-Slavery Standard, September 21, 1848. 

Poems, V. 1, 1849. 

[Memorial Verses, 18^8.] 
To the Muse. 

Under the Willows and Other Poems, 1868. 
To the Past. . 

Graham's Magazine, January, 1846, v. 28, p. 39. 

Poems, second series, 1848. 

[Miscellaneous Poems, 1877.] 



[65] 

To the Spirit of Keats. 
Arcturus, January, 1842. 
Poems, 1844. 
[Earlier Poems, 1877.] 

To Whittier, on his Seventy-fifth Birthday. 

Heartsease and Rue, 1888. 
To W. L. Garrison. 

Anti-Slavery Standard, October 16, 1848. [The Day of 
Small Things.] 

Poems, V. 2, 1849. 

[Memorial Verses, 1858.] 

Token, The. 
Poems, 1844. 
[Earlier Poems, 1877.] 

Trial. 

Anti-Slavery Standard, June 28, 1849. [Two Sonnets.] 
Poems, V. 1, 1849. 
[Miscellaneous Poems, 1877.] 

Tribute to C. F. Adams. 

Proceedings Massachusetts Historical Society, 1887. 
Tribute to John P. Kennedy. 

Proceedings Massachusetts Historical Society, 1870. 
Tribute to Edmund Quincy. 

Proceedings Massachusetts Historical Society, 1877. 
Trowbridge's "Old Battle-Ground." 

Atlantic Monthly, September, 1860, v. 6, p. 376. 

Triibner's Bibhographical Guide to American Literature. 

Atlantic Monthly, June, 1859, v. 3, p. 777. 
True Radical, The. 

Boston Miscellany, July, 1842, v. 2, p. 77. 
Trustee's Lament, The. 

Atlantic Monthly, August, 1858, v. 2, p. 370. 

Tuckerman's "Ajnerica and its Commentators." 

North American Review, October, 1864, v. 99, p. 624. 



[66] 

Turkish Tyranny and American. 

Anti-Slavery Standard, December 13, 1849. 
Anti-Slavery Papers, 1902. 

Turncoats. 

Anti-Slavery Standard, September 14, 1848. 
Anti-Slavery Papers, 1902. 

Turne/s Old Temeraire: Under a Figure symbolizing the 
Church. 
Atlantic Monthly, April, 1888, v. 61, p. 482. 
Last Poems, 1895. 

Two, The. 

Boston Miscellany, May, 1842, v. 1, p. 213. 

Two Gunners, The: A Fahle. 

Biglow Papers, first series. Introduction. 

Two Scenes from the Life of Blondel. Autumn, 1863. 

Atlantic Monthly, November, 1863, v. 12, p. 576. 
Under the Willows and Other Poems, 1868. 

[Two Sonnets to Wordsworth.] 

Graham's Magazine, March, 1843, v. 22, p. 190. 

Uncle Cobus's Story. 

Our Young Folks, July, 1866. 

Under the October Maples. 
Heartsease and Rue, 1888. 

Under the Old Elm. [Poem read at Cambridge on the 
hundredth anniversary of Washington's taking command 
of the American Army, 3d July, 1775.] 

Atlantic Monthly, August, 1875, v. 36, p. 221. [Under the 

Great Elm.] 
Cambridge in the Centennial Proceedings, Cambridge, 1875. 
Three Memorial Poems, 1876. 

Under the Willows. 

Atlantic Monthly, June, 1868, v. 21, p. 754. [A June Idyll.] 
Under the Willows and Other Poems, 1868. 



[67] 

Unhappy Lot of Mr. Knott, The. 

Graham's Magazine, April, 1851, v. 38, p. 281. 
Poetical Works, 1869. 

Union, The. 

Pennsylvania Freeman, April 10, 1845. 

Unlovely, The. 

A Year's Life, 1841. 

Up and Down the Irriwadi. [Palmer.] 

Atlantic Monthly, September, 1859, v. 4, p. 383. 

Valentine, A. 

Last Poems, 1895. 
" Verse cannot tell how beautiful thou art." 

Southern Literary Messenger, March, 1840, v. 6, p. 207. 

A Year's Life, 1841. 

Verses, intended to go with a Posset Dish. 

Last Poems, 1895. 
Verses suggested by the Present Crisis. 

Boston Courier, December 11, 1845. 

Poems, second series, 1848. [The Present Crisis.] 

[Miscellaneous Poems, 1877.] 

Villa Franca, 1859. 

Atlantic Monthly, December, 1859, v. 4, p. 738. [Italy.] 
Under the Willows and Other Poems, 1868. 

" Violet I sweet violet I " 

Graham's Magazine, January, 1842, v. 20, p. 37. 
Poems, 1844. 
[Earlier Poems, 1877.] 

Virginian in New England Thirty-five Years Ago, A. 

Atlantic Monthly, August, 1870, v. 26, p. 162. [Introduction 
to Diary of Lucian Minor of Virginia, 1834, which ap- 
peared in September, October, December, 1870, and June, 
1871.] 

Vision of Sir Launfal, The. 
Cambridge, 1848. 



[68] 

Voltaire. 

The PioDeer, January, 1843. 

Voyage down the Amoor, A. [Collins.] 

Atlantic Monthly, June, 1860, v. 5, p. 757. 

Voyage to Vineland, The. 

Under the Willows and Other Poems, 1868. 

Walton. 

The Nation, April 27, 1876, v. 22, p. 283. 

Introduction to John Bartlett's ed. of "Complete Angler," 

1889. 
Latest Literary Essays and Addresses, 1891. 

Washers of the Shroud, The. October, 1861. 

Atlantic Monthly, November, 1861, v. 8, p. 641. 
Under the Willows and Other Poems, 1868. 

Washington Monument, A. 

Anti-Slavery Standard, December 28, 1848. 
Anti-Slavery Papers, 1902. 

Webster [John]. 

Harper's Magazine, August, 1892, v. 85, p. 411. 
The Old English Dramatists, 1904. 

Webster's Dictionary. 

North American Review, January, 1865, v. 100, p. 299. 

Wendell Phillips. 
Poems, 1844. 
[Earlier Poems, 1877.] 

Wendell PhilKps in Congress. 

The Nation, October 4, 1866, v. 3, p. 272. 

What is it ? 

Harvardiana, October, 1837, v. 4, p. 57. 

What Mr. Robinson thinks. 

Boston Courier, November 2, 1847. 
Biglow Papers, first series, in. 



[69] 

What Rabbi Jehosha Said. [Originally written for a Fair in 
St. Louis.] 
The Nation, January 18, 1866, v. 2, p. 72. 
Under the Willows and Other Poems, 1868. 

" What reck I of the stars when I," 

Southern Literary Messenger, March, 1840, v. 6, p. 213. 

What shall be done for the Hungarian Exiles ? 
Boston Courier, January 3, 1850. 

''What were I, Love?" 
Poems, 1844. 
[Earlier Poems, 1877.] 

What will Mr. Webster do ? 

Anti-Slavery Standard, July 13, 1848. 
Anti-Slavery Papers, 1902. 

" When in a book I find a pleasant thought" 
The Dial, January, 1842, p. 357. 

''When the glad soul is full." 
A Year's Life, 1841. 

** Whene'er I read in mournful history." 

Boston Miscellany, May, 1842, v. 1, p. 200. 

White's Shakespeare. 

Atlantic Monthly, January, February, 1859, v. 3, pp. Ill, 
241. 

Whittier's "Home Ballads and Poems." 

Atlantic Monthly, November, 1860, v. 6, p. 637. 

Whittier's " In War Time." 

North American Review, January, 1864, v. 98, p. 290. 

Whittier's Poems. 

Anti-Slavery Standard, December 14, 1848. 

Whittier's " Snow-Bound." 

North American Review, April, 1866, v. 102, p. 631. 



[70] 

" Why should we ever weary of this life ? " 
A Year's Life, 1841. 

Widow's Mite, The. [Campaign Epigrams.] 
The Nation, September 14, 1876, v. 23, p. 163. 

Windharp, The. 

Putnam's MontHy, December, 1854, v. 4, p. 569. 
Under the Willows and Other Poems, 1868. 

Winter. 

The Present, March 1, 1844. 

Winter Evening Hymn to my Fire, A. 

Putnam's Monthly, March, 1854, v. 3, p. 328. 
Under the Willows and Other Poems, 1868. 

Winthrop Papers, The. 

North American Review, October, 1867, v. 105, p. 592. 

Witchcraft. 

North American Review, January, 1868, v. 106, pp. 176, 232. 
Reprinted as pamphlet, 1868. 
Among My Books, first series, 1870. 

With a Copy of Aucassin and Nicolete. 
Heartsease and Rue, 1888. 

With a Pair of Gloves lost in a Wager. 
Heartsease and Rue, 1888. 

With a Pressed Flower. 
Poems, V. 1, 1849. 
[Earlier Poems, 1877.] 

With a Seashell. 

Heartsease and Rue, 1888. 

With an Armchair. 

Heartsease and Rue, 1888. 

Without and Within. 

Putnam's Magazine, April, 1854, v. 3, p. 426. 
Under the Willows and Other Poems, 1868. 



1 

I 



[71] 

Woman. 

Boston Miscellany, May, 1842, p. 200. 

Word in Season, A. 

Pennsylvania Freeman, January 16, 1845. 
Anti-Slavery Papers, 1902. 

Wordsworth. 

Introduction to Wordsworth's Poetical Works, Boston, 1854. 
Among My Books, second series, 1876. 

Wordsworth. [Address as President of the Wordsworth 
Society, May 10, 1884.] 

Democracy and Other Addresses, 1886. 
Works of Edmund Burke, The. 

North American Review, April, 1866, v. 102, p. 634. 
Works of Walter Savage Landor, The. 

Massachusetts Quarterly Review, December, 1848. 
World's Fair, The. 1876. 

The Nation, August 5, 1875, v. 21, p. 82. 
Worthy Ditty, A. 

The Nation, January, 1866, p. 106. 
" Ye who behold the body of my thought.'* 

Poem/, 1844. 
Ye Yankees of the Bay State. 

Boston Morning Post, February 26, 1839. 
Youthful Experiment in English Hexameters, A. 

Heartsease and Rue, 1888. 
Yussouf. 

The Liberty Bell, 1851. 

Under the Willows and Other Poems, 1868. 



CHRONOLOGICAL LIST OF SEPARATE 
WORKS AND EDITIONS 

HARVARDIANA 

Harvardiana. Volume IV. Cambridge: Pub- 
lished by John Owen, mdcccxxxviii. 

During 1837 Lowell was one of the editors of this 
college magazine, and his contributions were as follows : 

No. I. September, 1837. 

New Poem of Homer, p. 18. 

Imitation of Burns (verse), p. 31, 

Dramatic Sketch (verse), p. 39. 
No. II. October. 

A Voice from the Tombs, p. 53. 

What is it? (verse), p. 57. 

Hints to Theme Writers, p. 58. 

Obituary, p. 64. 

The Serenade (verse), p. 65. 

The Old Bell, p. 74. 
No. in. November. 

The Idler, p. 29. 

Saratoga Lake, p. 111. 

Hints to Reviewers, No. i, p. 113. 

Skillygoliana, No. i, p. 119. 
No. IV. January, 1838. 

Scenes from an Unpublished Drama (verse), p. 143. 

Skillygoliana, No. ii (verse), p. 157. 

Chapters from the Life of Philomelus Prig, p. 169. 

Skillygoliana, No. iii (verse), p. 196. 



[73] 

No. VI. March. 

The Idler, No. ii, p. 223. 
No. VII. April. 

Skillygoliana, No. iv (partly verse), p. 274. 
No. VIII. May. 

A Dead Letter (verse), p. 317. 

No. IX. June. 

Extracts from a " Hasty Pudding Poem," p. 343. 
Translations from Uhland (verse), p. 352. 

CLASS POEM 

Class Poem. 

"Some said, John, print it; others said. Not so: 
Some said, It might be good; others said. No." 

BUNYAN. 

MDCCCXXXVIII 

[Reverse] Cambridge Press: Metcalf, Torry and Ballon. 
8vo, pp. 52, paper. Privately printed. 

[iii] Dedication. To the Class of 1838, Some of whom he loves, 
none of whom he hates. This "Poem" is Dedicated by 
Their Classmate. 

[v] Preface. 

Many of my readers, and all my friends, know that it was 
not by any desire of mine that this rather slim production 
is priQted. Circumstances known to all my readers, and 
which I need not dilate on here, considerably cooled my 
interest in the performance. Many of the lines, though 
in fact they would even then be indifferent good, I should 
prefer if possible to see in prose. Sed Dis aliter. Many were 
written merely as rough draughts, which I intended to 
have altered and revised, but the change of feeling, men- 
tioned above, has prevented, and rough draughts they 
are still. There are a few grains of gold, at least tinsel, in 
the composition, but the lead — oh word infaust to poets! 
— will, I fear, far outweigh them. A few passages I have 
omitted, whose place is sufficiently well supplied by asterisks. 



[74] 

Paltry, however, as it is, I submit it (at their desire) to my 
readers, coDfident 

"That never anything can be amiss, 
When simpleness and duty tender it." 
Concord, Mass., August, 1838. 

[7H5, Class Poem. 47-52, Notes. 

Auction Sale Prices. 

French and Chubbuck, February, 1904, $26. 

Libbie, March, 1904, $21. 

Anderson, December, 1904, $36. 

Knapp, February, 1905, $82. 

Alger, May, 1905, $16. 

Pyser, Boston, 1906, $30. 

A YEAR'S LIFE 

A Year's Life. By James Russell Lowell. Qd^ 
]^abe gelebt unb geltebet. Boston: C, C, Little and 
J. Brown, mdcccxli. 

16mo, pp. viii, 182. Light brown boards, 
paper label. Slip of errata inserted opposite 
p. 182. Published January, 1841. 

[v] [Dedication.] 

The gentle Una I have loved. 

The snowy maiden, pure and mild, 
Since ever by her side I roved. 

Through ventures strange, a wandering child, 
In fantasy a Red Cross Knight, 
Burning for her dear sake to fight. 

If there be one who can, like her. 
Make sunshine in life's shady places, 

One in whose holy bosom stir 
As many gentle household graces, — 

And such I think there needs must be, — 

Will she accept this book from me ? 



075] 

[vii] Contents. 

[1] Half-title. 

[2] [Poetical Preface.] 

Hope first the gentle Poet leads, 
And he is glad to follow her; 
Kind is she, and to all his needs 
With a free hand doth minister. 

But, when Hope at last hath fled, 

Cometh her sister Memory; 

She wreathes Hope's garlands round her head. 

And strives to seem as fair as she. 

Then Hope comes back, and by the hand 
She leads a child most fair to see. 
Who with a joyous face doth stand 
Uniting Hope and Memory. 

So brighter grew the Earth around. 
And bluer grew the sky above; 
The Poet now his guide hath found, 
And follows in the steps of Love. 

Contents 
Dedication 
Poetical Preface 
Threnodia 
The Serenade 

Song, Lift up the curtains of thine eyes 
The Departed 
The Bobolink 

Song, What reck I of the stars, when I 
The Poet 
Flowers 
The Lover 
To E. W. G. 
Isabel 
Music 

Song, O! I must look on that sweet face 
lanthe 
Lore's Altar 



1176] 

My Love 

With a Pressed Flower 

Impartiality 

Bellerophon 

Sometliing Natural 

The Syrens 

A Feeling 

The Beggar 

Serenade 

Irene 

The Lost Child 

The Church 

The Unlovely 

Love-Song 

Song, All things are sad 

A Love-Dream 

Fourth of July Ode 

Sphinx 

Sonnets 

Disappointment 

Great Human Nature 

To a Friend 

Continued 

child of Nature 
For this true nobleness 

To 

Continued 

"Why should we ever weary 
Green Mountains 
My friend, adown Life's valley 
Verse cannot say how beautiful 
The soul would fain 

1 saw a gate 

I would not have this perfect love 

To the dark, narrow house 

I fain would give to thee 

Much had I mused 

Sayest thou, most beautiful 

Poet! who sittest in thy pleasant room 

Not more but so ? 



[77] 

To a Voice heard in Mount Auburn 

On reading Spenser again 

Light of mine eyes 

Silent as one who treads 

A gentleness that grows of steady faith 

When the glad soul is full 

To the Evening-star 

Reading 

To , after a Snow-storm 

Sonnets on Names 

Edith 

Rose 

Mary 

Caroline 

Anne 
Goe, Little Booke 

Notices and Criticisms. 

C. S. Wheeler, Christian Examiner, March, 1841, v. 30, 

p. 131. 
George S. Hiliard, North American Review, April, 1841, 

V. 52, p. 452. 
Boston Quarterly Review, April, 1841, v. 14, p. 259. 
Southern Literary Messenger, May and June, 1841, v. 7, 

p. 383. 
Graham's Magazine, April, 1842, v. 20, p. 195. 

Auction Sale Prices. 
Roos, Boston, 1897, $41. 
Bierstadt, New York, $45. 
Deuny, Boston, 1906, $35. 
Pyser, Boston, 1906, $45. 

THE PIONEER 

The Pioneer. A Literary and Critical Maga- 
zine. J. R. Lowell and R. Carter, Editors and 
Proprietors. Boston: Leland and Whiting, 

Published in January, February, and March, 1843. 
liOwell's contributions were as follows: 



[78] 

No. I. Introduction, p. 1. 
[Voltaire] (verse), p. 5. 
The Follower (verse), p. 11. 

Sonnet (Our love is not a fading earthly flower), p. 25. 
The Plays of Thomas Middleton, p. 32. 
The Rose (In his tower sat the poet), p. 40. 

No. II. Song- writing, p. 73. 

To M. O. S. (Mary, since first I knew thee, to this 
hour), p. 90. 

No. III. A Love Thought (verse), p. 119. 
The Street (sonnet), p. 131. 

Poems. By James Russell Lowell. Cambridge: 

Published by John Owen, mdcccxliv. [1843.] 

16mo, pp. xii, 279, boards, paper label. 

[v-vii] To William Page 

My Dear Friend, — 

The love between us, which can now look back upon 
happy years of still enduring confidence, and forward, with 
a sure trust in its own prophecy of yet deeper and tenderer 
sympathies, as long as life shall remain to us, stands in no need, 
I am well aware, of so poor a voucher as an Epistle Dedicatory. 
True, it is one of Love's chiefest charms, that it must still take 
special pains to be superfluous in seeking out ways to declare 
itself, — but for these it demands no publicity, and wishes no 
acknowledgement. But the admiration which one soul feels 
for another loses half its warmth, if it let slip any opportunity 
of making itself heard and felt by that strange Abbot of 
Unreason which we call the World. For the humblest man's 
true admiration is no uncertain oracle of the verdict of Poster- 
ity, — the unerring tribunal where Genius is at last allowed the 
right of trial by its peers, and to which none but sincere and 
real Greatness can appeal with an unwavering heart. There 
the false witnesses of to-day will be unable to appear, being 
fled to some hospitable Texas in the realms of Limbo, beyond 
the reach of its jurisdiction and the summons of its apparitors. 
I have never seen the works of the Great Masters of your 



[79] 

Art, but I have studied their lives, and I am sure that no nobler, 
gentler, or purer spirit than yours was ever anointed by the 
Eternal Beauty to bear that part of her divine message which 
it belongs to the Great Painter to reveal. The sympathy of 
sister pursuits, of an agreeing artistic faith, and, yet more, of 
a common hope for the final destiny of man, has not been 
wanting to us, and now you will forgive the pride in having 
this advantage over you, namely, of telling that admiration in 
public which I have never stinted to utter in private. You will 
believe, that, as your winning that fadeless laurel, which you 
deserve, and which will one day surely be yours, can never 
heighten my judgement of you, so nothing that is not in your 
own control will ever lower it, and that I shall think as simply 
of you when the World's opinion has overtaken my own, as now. 

As the swiftly diverging channels of Life bear wider and 
wider apart from us the friends who hoisted sail with us as 
fellow-mariners, when we cast off for the voyage, and as some, 
even, who are yet side by side with us, no longer send back to 
us an answering cheer, we are drawn the more closely to those 
that remain, and I would fain hope that this joining of our 
names will always be one of our not least happy memories. 
And so, with all best wishes, 

I remain always your friend, 

J. R. Lowell. 

Cambridge t December 15, 1843. 

Contents 
A Legend of Brittany 
Part I 
Part TI 
Miscellaneous Poems 
Prometheus 

Song, "Violet! sweet violet!" 
Rosaline 
Allegra 
The Fountain 
A Dirge 

The Shepherd of King Admetus 
The Token 
An Incident in a Railroad Car 



[80] 

Rhoecns 

Song, "There is a light in thy bhie eyes" 
In Sadness 
A Requiem 
The Fatherland 
A Parable 
Forgetf Illness 
A Reverie 
Love 

To Perdita, singing 

Ode, "In the old days of awe and keen-eyed wonder" 
The Moon 

A Glance behind the Curtain 
The Forlorn 

Song, "O moonlight deep and tender " 
Midnight 
A Prayer 
Fantasy 
The Heritage 
The Rose: a BaUad 
Elegy on the Death of Dr. Channing 
Stanzas sung at the Anti-Slavery Picnic in Dedham 
Silence 

A Chippewa Legend 
Sonnets 

I. "Through suffering and sorrow" 
II. "What were I, Love " 

III. Impatience and Reproof 

IV. Reformers 

V. The Fiery Trial 

VI. " Great Truths are portions of the soul " 
VII. "I ask not for those thoughts" 
VIII. To , on her Birthday 

IX. "My Love, I have no fear" 

X. "I cannot think that thou" 
XI. The Haven 

XII. Resolve 

xin. "There never yet was flower" 
xrv. Sub pondere crescit 

XV. To the Spirit of Keats 



[81] 

XVI. The Poet 

XVII. ** Beloved, in the noisy city here" 
XVIII. "Full many noble friends" 

xrx. "How oft do I live o'er" 

XX. "Slow-opening flower" 

XXI. On Reading Wordsworth's Sonnets in defence of 

Capital Punishment 
XXII. The Same, continued 

XXIII. The Same, continued 

XXIV. The Same, continued 
XXV. The Same, continued 

XXVI. The Same, concluded 

XXVII. To "Mary, since first I knew thee, to this 

hour" 
XXVIII. "Our Love is not a fading, earthly flower" 
XXIX. Thankfulness 
XXX. In Absence 
XXXI. Wendell Phillips 
XXXII. The Street 

XXXIII. "I grieve not that ripe knowledge" 

XXXIV. "Ye who behold the body of my thought" 
XXXV. "O, happy childhood!" 

XXXVI. On my twenty-fourth Birthday 
XXXVII. To J. R. Giddings 
L'Envoi 

The Same: London C E, Mudie, 1844. 

12mo, p. 279, cloth. 

[iv] Advertisement to the English Edition 
James Russell Lowell is a Young American Poet of great 
promise, whose writings have already obtained considerable 
reputation in his own country. The present Volume, recently 
published in New York, is now reprinted in London, in the 
belief that its thoughtfulness and beauty will commend it to 
the attention of the English Public; more especially as it ap- 
pears to furnish a fair specimen of that new development 
of intellect and feeling, which renders much of the recent 
literature of America attractive to the minds of many Euro- 
peans. 



[82] 

The Same. London: Routledge. 1844. 
18mo, l^mo, and post Svo editions. 

The Same. London: J. Chapman, 1844. 
Post 8vo. 

Notices and Criticisms. 
Democratic Review, February, 1844, v. 14, p. 215. 
W. A. Davis, Christian Examiner, March, 1844, v. 36, p. 173. 
Edgar Allan Poe, Graham's Magazine, March, 1844, v. 24, 

p. 142. Reprinted in Harrison's edition of Poe, v. 1 1 , p. 243. 
C. C. Felton, North American Review, April, 1844, v. 58, 

p. 283. Littell's Living Age, November 16, 1844, v. 3, 

p. 161. 
Francis Bowen, North American Review, April, 1847, v. 64, 

p. 460. 

Auction Sale Prices. 
Arnold, January, 1901, $60. 
Bangs, February 13, 1901, $35. 
Brown, April, 1901, $150. 
McKee, May, 1902, $32.50. 
Conely, October, 1902, $35. 
French and Chubbuck, February 23, 1904, $4.50. 

CONVERSATIONS ON SOME OF THE OLD 
POETS 

Conversations on Some of the Old Poets. 
By James Russell Lowell. 

"Or, if I would delight my private hours 
With music or with poem, where, so soon 
As in our native language, can I find 
That solace." 

Paradise Regained. 

Cambridge : Published by John Owen. 
MDCCCXLV. [1844.] 

12mo, pp. viii, 263, cloth. 



[83] 

[iii] To my Father, Charles Lowell, D. D., whom, if I had 
not the higher privilege of revering as a parent, I should still 
have honored as a man and loved as a friend, this volume, 
containing many opinions from which he will wholly, yet with 
the large charity of a Christian heart, dissent, is inscribed, by 
his youngest child. 

[iv] "Hail, bards of mighty grasp! on you 
I chiefly call, the chosen few. 
Who cast not off the acknowledged guide. 
Who faltered not, nor turned aside. 
Whose lofty genius could survive 
Privation, under sorrow thrive." 

Wordsworth. 

[v-viii] To THE Reader 

A preface is always either an apology or an explanation; and 
a good book needs neither. That I write one, then, proves that 
I am diffident of the merit of this volume, to a greater degree, 
even, than an author must necessarily be. 

For the minor faults of the book, the hurry with which it 
has been prepared must plead in extenuation, since it was in 
process of writing and printing at the same time, so that I could 
never estimate its proportions as a whole. This must excuse 
the too great length of the First Conversation, which I should 
have divided, had I known in time how it would have grown 
under my hands, which I trust the candid reader will refer to 
the same exculpatory cause. 

The substance of two other Conversations appeared more 
than two years ago in the "Boston Miscellany," a magazine 
conducted by my friend, N. Hale, Jr., Esq. The articles, as 
then written, met with some approbation, and I had often been 
urged to reprint them by friends with whose wishes it was as 
well my duty as my delight to comply. Yet I felt strongly 
reluctant in this matter; aod my reluctance increased after 
looking over the articles and seeing how imperfect they were. 

It then occmred to me, that, by throwing them into the 
form of conversations, greater freedom would be given them, 
and that discursiveness, which was their chief fault, (among 
many others, of style,) would find readier pardon. Some of 
the deepest, as well as the most delightful books, have been 



|]84] 

written in this form in our own language, not to speak of its 
prevalent use among the Greeks and Latins. I need only- 
mention the names of Isaak Walton, Walter Savage Landor, 
and Home Tooke, to recall to mind three of the most promi- 
nent among many English examples.^ 

I had no intention of giving them anything like a dramatic 
turn, and I trust I shall not so be censured. They are merely 
essays, divided in this way to allow them greater ease and 
frankness, and the privilege of wandering at will. That this 
license has not been carried to a greater degree than is war- 
ranted by the usual suggestiveness of conversation will, I think, 
be conceded. If some of the topics introduced seem foreign 
to the subject, I can only say, that they are not so to my mind, 
and that an author's object in writing criticisms is not only to 
bring to light the beauties of the works he is considering, but 
also to express his own opinions upon those and other mat- 
ters. 

Wishing, as I did, to preserve, as far as possible, unaltered, 
whatever had given pleasure to others in the articles as already 
written, I experienced many difficulties. It is impossible to 
weld cast-iron, and I had not time to melt and recast it. 

I am not bold enough to esteem these essays of any great 
price. Standing as yet only in the outer porch of life, I cannot 
be expected to report of those higher mysteries which lie unre- 
vealed in the body of the temple. Yet, as a child, when he has 
found out a mean pebble, which differs from ordinary only so 
much as by a stripe of quartz or a stain of iron, calls his com- 
panions to behold his treasure, which to them also affords 
matter of delight and wonder; so I cannot but hope that my 
little findings may be pleasant and haply instructive to some 
few. 

An author's opinions should be submitted to no arbitration 
but that of solitude and his own conscience; but many defects 
and blemishes in his mode of expressing them may doubtless 
be saved him by submitting his work, before publication, to the 
judgement of some loving friend — and if to the more refined 
eye of a woman, the better. But the haste with which these 
pages have been prepared and printed has precluded all but a 

* Among the pleasantest recent writings in this form, I would njen- 
tion "The Philosophy of Mystery," by W. C. Dendy, M.D. 



[85] 

very trifling portion of them from being judged by any eye save 
my own. 
Elmwood, Cambridge, Mass,, 
Dec. 19, 1844. 

Erratum. 
Page 127, 10th line from bottom, for "superadds to the 
sea keener," read "superadds to these a keener." 

[Contents, as shown in the headlines. 
Chaucer, 1-121 
The Old Dramatists, 122-141 
Chapman, 143-211 
The Old Dramatists, 212-231 
Ford, 233-263] 

The Same. 

Second edition, Cambridge : Owen, 1846. Same 
as first. 

The Same. 

London edition: Henry G, Clarke & Co., 1845. 
Small 8vo, pp. x, 273. 

The Same. 

Third edition: enlarged [so-called], with intro- 
duction by Robert Ellis Thompson, Phila- 
delphia: David McKay, 1893. 

This edition also contains " Thomas Middleton " and 
"Song-Writing," from "The Pioneer." 

The Same. 

In Handy Volume Classics, New York: Crowell, 
1901. 

Notices and Criticisms. 

Charles Timothy Brooks, Christian Examiner, March, 

1845, V. 38, p. 211. 
Knickerbocker Magazine, February, 1845, v. 25, p. 166. 



[86] 

Auction Sale Prices. First Edition. 
Roos sale, March, 1900, $27. 
Bangs, November 12, 1900, $20. 
Arnold, January, 1901, presentation copy, $52.50. 
Appleton, 1903, $40. 
Bartlett, May, 1903, $100. 
French and Chubbuck, February 23, 1904, $3.25. 

POEMS, SECOND SERIES 

Poems. By James Russell Lowell. Second Series, 
Cambridge: Published by George Nichols, 
Boston: B. B. Mussey & Co., 1848, [1847.] 
12mo, pp. [x], 184, cloth. 

[v] To the ever fresh and happy memory of our little Blanche 
this volume is reverently dedicated. 

[vi] To M. W. L. 

I thought our love at full, but I did err. 

[Earlier Poems, Sonnet xxvii] 
Contents 
Coliunbus 

An Incident of the Fire at Hamburg 
The Epitaph 
Hunger and Cold 
The Landlord 
To a Pine-Tree 

Si descendero in Infernum, ades 
To the Past 
To the Future 
Hebe 

The Search 
The Present Crisis 
Summer Storm 
The Growth of the Legend 
A Contrast 
Extreme Unction 
The Oak 



[87] 

The Royal Pedigree 

Above and Below 

The Captive 

The Birch-Tree 

An Interview with Miles Standish 

On the Capture of Certain Fugitive Slaves near Washington 

On the Death of Charles T. Torrey 

Remembered Music 

Song: to M. L. 

To the Dandelion 

The Ghost-Seer 

The Morning-Glory [Mrs. Lowell] 

Studies for Two Heads 

On a Portrait of Dante by Giotto 

On the Death of a Friend's Child 

Anti-Texas 

The Falconer 

The Changeling 

An Indian-Summer Reverie 

The Pioneer 

Longing 

viii ***The poem called "The Morning-Glory" on page 131, 
it is proper to state, is by another hand [Mrs. Maria White 
Lowell]. 

The Same. London: Wiley, 1848. 
12mo. 

Notices and Criticisms. 

W. H. Hurlbut, Christian Examiner, March, 1848, v. 44, 

p. 309. 
Francis Bowen, North American Review, April, 1848, 
V. 66, p. 458. 

Auction Sale Prices. 

Arnold, January, 1901, $15. 
Bangs, February, 1901, $17. 
Olcott, April, 1901, $10.25. 
Anderson, October, 1901, $10.50. 
Conely, October, 1902, $8. 



[88] 

French and Chubbuck, February, 1904, $6. 
Knapp, February, 1905, $6. 
Anderson, March, 1905, $5.50. 
Anderson, April, 1905, $9.50. 

A FABLE FOR CRITICS 

Reader! Walk up at once (it will soon be 
too late) and buy at a perfectly ruinous rate a 
FABLE FOR CRITICS; or Better — I like, 
as a thing that the reader's first fancy may 
strike, an old-fashioned title-page, such as pre- 
sents a tabular view of the volume's contents — 
A GLANCE AT A FEW OF OUR LITER- 
ARY PROGENIES (Mrs. Malaprop's word) 
from the Tub of Diogenes. That is, a Series 
of Jokes. BY A WONDERFUL QUIZ, who 
accompanies himself with a rub-a-dub-dub, full 
of spirit and grace, on the top of the tub. SET 
FORTH IN October the 21st day, in the 
year '48. By G. P. PUTNAM, Broadway. 

12mo, pp. [i]-iii, [5]-78, brown cloth. Half- 
title, with full-page advertisement of Putnam's 
books on reverse, opposite title-page. Rubri- 
cated title-page, in black and red, with "That 
is, a Series of Jokes," in red, while *'set forth in" 
is in black. The line, ''A vocal and musical 
medley," is wanting. "By," before G. P. 
Putnam, forms a single line. Rhymed preface, 
in prose form (contained in all subsequent 
editions), occupies pp. [i]-iii. Headlines over 
text, with a small vignette of harp on last page. 
Cloth of the binding is a dark-brown muslin, 



[89] 

with simple brown stamp on sides, with pub- 
lisher's monogram in a shield in the middle, and 
plain gold lettering on the back. 

In this edition there are several misprints. Page 25, 
line 10, has "cotilion;" and page 40, line 21, " Goliah. " 
In a letter to Sydney Howard Gay, December 20, 1848, 
Lowell writes, "Briggs must give you a copy of the 
second edition, in which the atrocious misprints of the 
other will be corrected." 

The first edition was advertised for October 20, and 
was ready for the pubKc on the 25th. The title-page 
stated the date of its publication as the 21st, which was 
in later editions changed to the 31st. The first edition 
was of 1000 copies, was printed from type, and the forms 
were distributed as soon as the printing was completed. 
This may in part account for the numerous misprints. 

In Putnam's Book-list for 1848 appeared this an- 
nouncement: 

Fable for Critics: A New Satirical Poem; or, A Glance at 
a Few of Our Literary Progenies. By a Wonderful Quiz. 1 
Vol., 12mo, boards, 50 cents; cloth, 63 cents. 

*:j:*The "Fable" is full of a genial humor, and abounds in 
most felicitous satire at our men and women of letters, some 
of whom are sketched with inimitable skill and truthfulness. 

The Same. Second Edition. 

Reader ! Walk up at once (it will soon be too 
late) and buy at a perfectly ruinous rate a 
FABLE FOR CRITICS; or, Better (I like, 
as a thing that the reader's first fancy may 
strike, an old-fashioned title-page, such as 
presents a tabular view of the volume's con- 
tents) A GLANCE AT A FEW OF OUR 
LITERARY PROGENIES (Mrs. Mala- 
prop's word) from the Tub of Diogenes; A 



[90] 

Vocal and Musical Medley. That is, a Series 
of Jokes. BY A WONDERFUL QUIZ, who 

accompanies himself with a rub-a-dub-dub, 
full of spirit and grace, on the top of the tub. 
SET FORTH IN October, the 21st day, in the 
year '48. G. P. PUTNAM, Broadway. 

The title-page of the second edition differs in several 
essential respects from the first. "A vocal and musical 
medley" has been added, and "by" before the pub- 
lisher's name has been omitted. The parenthetical 
clause, "I like, . . . contents," has been enclosed in 
parentheses. In some copies of this edition the publisher's 
address is changed, as noted hereafter. 

The second edition was Stereotyped and appeared 
early in January, 1849. Some of the misprints were 
corrected; but a curious one remained on page 54, 
line 18, where "censor" appears in place of "censer," 
thus spoiling both the meaning and the pun. Three 
printings of this edition seem to have taken place in 1849 
(though each has been called an edition); the first in 
January, the second in February, and the third in 
November. It is very difficult to distinguish the several 
printings of the second edition, five or six copies with 
distinctive features having been examined, two of which 
appear to have been printed or bound-up in November. 
In one of these the rhymed preface occupies pp. [iii]-v; 
text, pp. [7]-80. There are no headlines, and the vignette 
on last page is absent. The only signature is 2* on page 33. 
No advertisements. In another copy there is no half- 
title ; and the names of the printers, Leavitt, Trow & Co., 
appear on reverse of title-page. " A Preliminary Note to 
the Second Edition" follows the title-leaf, unpaged, 
and is succeeded by the rhymed preface, paged [iii]-v. 
Putnam's advertisement at the end is dated November, 
1848. The matter on each page is identical with the first 



[91] 

edition, but the type is different, and the pagination is 
two pages ahead in all printings of the second; that is, 
page 7 of the second corresponds to page 5 of the first 
edition. There is no ruled headline. In another copy 
the rhymed preface is first and is followed by the pre- 
liminary note. 

What appears to be a fourth printing gives the address 
of Putnam as 10 Park Place, date same as in first edition, 
with rhyme left imperfect. In 1890 Lowell wrote: " Mr. 
Putnam, I beheve, never discovered that the title-page 
was in metre, nor that it was in rhyme either. Mr. Nor- 
ton told me the other day that he had a copy of some 
later edition (after Putnam had changed his place of 
business), in which the imprint was * G. P. Putnam, 
Astor (or something) Place.' I don't remember whether 
I knew of it at the time, but had I known, I should have 
let it pass as adding to the humor of the book." This 
edition has no advertising pages, and the " Preliminary 
Note" is after the rhymed preface. Muslin binding, 
blind stamp on sides, with oval in centre, and blind lines 
at the top and bottom of the back. 

The Same. Fifth edition, Boston : Tichnor and 
Fields, 1856. 

12mo. Bottom of title-page after "top of the 
tub" omitted. Matter on each page the same, 
but diflFerent type. "Candid remarks to the 
Reader," pp. [iii]~v. "Preliminary Note," pp. 
[l]-6. Text, pp. [7]-80. Ticknor and Fields' 
"New Books and New Editions " occupy 12 
pages at end, dated March, 1856. 

Poetical Works, Boston: Ticknor & Fields, 
1857. 
Two vols. 



[92] 

The second volume opens with "A Fable for 
Critics." In all previous editions the headline had 
been, " A Fable for the Critics," but in this one it is 
made to conform to the title-page. \ In the first and 
subsequent editions the date had been "October the 
21st day," but in this one it is changed for the first 
time to "October the 31st day," which has been since 
retained. 

A Fable for Critics, by James Russell Lowell. 
With vignette Portraits of the Authors de'quibus 
fabula narratur. [Riverside Press] vignette. 
Boston and New York : Houghton, Mifflin and 
Company, mdcccxci. [October, 1890.] 
12mo, pp. 101, cloth. 

Opposite title-page the rubricated title-page as in 
second edition. Putnam. '48. 

[4] To Charles F. Briggs this volume is affectionately inscribed. 

[5] This jeu d'esprit was extemporized, I may fairly say, so 
rapidly was it written, purely for my own amusement and with 
no thought of publication. I sent daily instalments of it to a friend 
in New York, the late Charles F. Briggs. He urged me to let it be 
printed, and I at last consented to its anonymous publication. The 
secret was kept till several persons had laid claim to its authorship. 

The Same. 

Riverside Literature Series, no. M. 

Notices and Criticisms. 
Democratic Review, December, 1848, v. 23, p. 564. 
Francis Bowen, North American Review, January, 1849, 

V. 68, p. 192. 
Thomas Hughes, Critic, v. 8, p. 152. 
Edgar Allan Poe, in " On Poetry and the Poets," Griswold's 

edition of Poe, v. 3, p. 275; Woodberry's edition, v. 6, 

p. 240. 
LittelFs Living Age, March 16, 1849, v. 92, p. 681. 



[93] 

Auction Sale Prices. First Edition. 
Roos, March, 1900, $7.50. 
Bangs, May, 1900, $13. 
McKee, November, 1900, $18. 
Bangs, January, 1902, $20. 
Appleton, April, 1903, $11.50. 
Anderson, January, 1904, $11.50. 
French and Chubbuck, February, 1904, $8. 
Anderson, April, 1905, $21. 
Gordon, April, 1905, $17. 

THE BIGLOW PAPERS, FIRST SERIES 

Meliboeus-Hipponax. The Biglow Papers, 
Edited, with an Introduction, Notes, Glossary, 
and Copious Index, by Homer Wilbur, A. M., 
Pastor of the First Church of Jalaam, and 
(Prospective) memberof many Literary, Learned 
and Scientific societies (for which see page v). 

The ploughman's whistle, or the trivial flute. 
Finds more respect than great Apollo's lute. 

Qimrles Emblems^ B. ii, E. 8. 

Margaritas, munde porcine, calcasti: en, siliquas accipe. 

Jac. Car. Fit. ad Pub. Leg. 1. 

Cambridge: Published by George Nichols. 
New York: George P, Putnam, 155 Broadway, 
1848. 

12mo, pp. xxxii, 163, cloth. 

Pp. 1-12, preceding title, contained "Notices of an 
Independent Press;" [v]-vii, Note to title-page; viii, 
titles of Wilbur; [ix]-xxi. Introduction. The poems 
entitled " The Two Gunners " and " Leaving the Matter 
open " were added in later editions. 

Part of this edition was printed with, and part with- 



[94] 

out, the "Notices of an Independent Press," preceding 
title. 

Contents. 

No. I. A Letter from Mr. Ezekiel Biglow of Jaalam 
to the Hon. Joseph T. Buckingham, Editor of the 
Boston Courier, enclosing a Poem from his Son, Mr. 
Hosea Biglow. 

No. II. A Letter from Mr. Hosea Biglow to the Hon. 
J. T. Buckingham, Editor of the Boston Courier, 
covering a letter from Mr. B. Sawin, Private in the 
Massachusetts Regiment. 

No. III. What Mr. Robinson thinks. 

No. rV. Remarks of Increase D. O'Phace, Esquire, at 
an Extrumpery Caucus in State Street, reported by . 
Mr. Hosea Biglow. 

No. V. The Debate in the Sennit. Sot to a Nusry 
Rhyme. 

No. VI. The Pious Editor's Creed. 

No. VII. A Letter from a Candidate for the Presidency 
in Answer to suttin Questions proposed by Mr. 
Hosea Biglow, enclosed in a Note from Mr. Biglow 
to S. H. Gay, Esq., Editor of the National Anti- 
Slavery Standard. 

No. VIII. A Second Letter from B. Sawin, Esq. 

No. IX. A Third Letter from B. Sawin, Esq. 

Glossary. 

Index. 

The Choicest Humorous Poetry of the Age. 
The Biglow Papers. Alluded to by John Bright 
in the House of Commons, with additional 
Notes, an enlarged Glossary, and an Illustration 
by George Cruikshank. London : John Camden 
Hotten, 1859. 

16mo, pp. xvi, 198, brown cloth. 



[95] 

With "Preface to the present Edition by John 
Camden Hotten," dated "Piccadilly, Oct. 25, 1859." 
This was a " pirated " edition. 

The Same. Fourth edition. Boston: Ticknor 
and Fields, 1857. Pp. xxxii, 163. 

The Same. Newly edited, with a Preface by the 
Author of "Tom Brown's School-days." Re- 
printed, with the Author's sanction, from the 
fourth American edition. London: Truhner 
& Co., 1859. 

12mo, pp. xli, 140. 

Thomas Hughes's preface occupies twenty 
pages. 

Notices and Criticisms. 

Literary World, December 2, 1848, v. 3, p. 872. 

Francis Bowen, North American Review, January, 1849, 

V. 68, p. 183. 
D. March, New Englander, February, 1849, v. 7, p. 63. 
Littell's Living Age, ** Yankee Humor," March 16, 1849, 

V. 92, p. 681. 

Auction Sale Prices. First Edition. ^ 
Arnold, January, 1901, $21. 
Roos, March, 1900, $10. 
Bangs, May, 1900, $13. 
Libbey, May, 1901, $12.62. 
Morgan, April, 1902, $10. 
Bangs, November, 1902, $7.75. 
Bangs, April, 1899, $16. 
Anderson, January, 1905, $12. 
Denny, January, 1906, $10. 
Pyser, February, 1906, $18. 



[96] 

THE VISION OF SIR LAUNFAL 

The Vision of Sir Launfal. By James Russell 
Lowell. Cambridge: Published by George 
Nichols, 1848. 

16mo, pp. 27, cloth. 

Introductory matter not paged, but the " Note, " 
which has appeared in all editions, was printed on page 
succeeding title-leaf. 

A second edition appeared in 1849, and a third in 1850. 

The Same. By James Russell Lowell. Fourth 
Edition. Boston: Ticknor, Reed, and Fields, 

MDCCCLI. 

Pp. [9]-33. 

Note opposite title-leaf. 

The Same. Illustrated edition. Boston: Tich- 
nor & Fields, 1866. 

16mo, pp. 29, cloth. Illustrations by Sol. 
Eytinge, Jr. 

The Vision of Sir Launfal, The Cathedral, 
Favorite Poems. James R, Osgood & Co., 
1876. 

16mo, pp. 108. Illustrated. 

Modem Classics, no. 5. 

Contents : 
The Vision of Sir Launfal 
The Cathedral 
My Love 
Above and Below 
The Changeling 

The Shepherd of King Admetus 
Ambrose 
Masaccio 



[97] 

An Incident of the Fire at Hamburg 

To the Dandelion 

Beaver Brook 

An Interview with Miles Standish 

The Courtin' 

What Mr. Robinson thinks 

Mr. Hosea Biglow to the Editor of the Atlantic Monthly 

To Charles Eliot Norton 

The First Snow-Fall 

Without and Within 

Godminster Chimes 

Auf Wiedersehen 

Palinode 

After the Burial 

The Dead House 

Yussouf 

What Rabbi Jehosha said 

All-Saints 

The Darkened Mind 

An Ember Picture 

To H. W. L. 

The Nightingale in the Study 

In the Twilight 

The Foot-Path 

The Washers of the Shroud 

The Same. London: Sampson, Low & Co., 1876. 
Same as Boston edition of 1866. 

The Vision of Sir Launfal. Louisville : Amer- 
ican Printing House for the Blind, 1878. 
4to, pp. 15. 
In raised letters for the use of the blind. 

The Vision of Sir Launfal, and Thirty-three 
Other Poems. Boston: The Howe Memorial 
Printing House, 1881. 

4to, pp. 161. 

In raised letters for the use of the blind. 



[98] 

The Vision of Sir Launfal, and Other Poems. 
Boston: Houghton, Mifflin iSc Company, 1887. 

16mo, pp. xii, 113. Biographical Sketch, 
Notes, Portraits, and Other Illustrations, and 
Aids to the Study of the Vision of Sir Launfal, 
by H. A. Davidson. 

Riverside Literature Series, no. 30. 
Contents 

Sketch of Life of James Russell Lowell 

Vision of Sir Launfal 

Poems having a Special Relation to Vision of Sir Launfal 

Cfroup A 
The Search (1847) 
A Parable (1848) 
Freedom (1848) 
Stanzas on Freedom (1843) 
Bibliolatres (1849) 
The Present Crisis (1845) 
To W. L, Garrison (1848) 
Wendell Phillips (1842) 

Growp B 

Beaver Brook (1849) 

Al Fresco (1849) 

An Indian-Summer Reverie ^1848) 

Hebe (1847) 

The Oak (1846) 
The Harvard Commemoration 
Ode Recited at the Harvard Commemoration 
Memoriae Positum 

Mr. Hosea Biglow to the Editor of the Atlantic Monthly 
The First Snow-Fall 
The Chaugeling 
The Foot-Path 
Aladdin 
Aids to the Study of the Vision of Sir Launfal by H. A. 

Davidson 
The Study of the Vision of Sir Launfal 



[99] 

A Few References for the Study of Lowell's Life and Works 
The Lidebtedness of the Author of the Vision of Sir Launfal 

to Other Writers 
Topics for Study 

The Vision of Sir Launfal, and Other Poems. 

Boston: Houghton, Mifflin & Co., 1900. 

16mo, pp. viii, 138. Critical and Biographical 

Introductions. 

Riverside Aldine Classics. 

Contents ' 
Note 

The Vision of Sir Launfal 
A Fable for Critics 
Ode Recited at the Harvard Commemoration 

The Vision of Sir Lalwfal. Boston: Houghton, 
Mifflin & Co, 

32mo, pp. 78. Illustrated. 
Lilliput Classics. 

The Vision of Sir Launfal, and Other Poems. 
Edited, with Introduction and Notes, by Ellen 
A. Vinton. Boston: Sanborn & Co,, 1889. 
16mo, pp. xxix, 63. Portrait. 
Cambridge Literature Series, no. 4. 

The Vision of Sir Launfal. Boston : Houghton, 
Mifflin & Co,, 1890. (September.) 
Japanese paper edition. 

The Same. Boston: Houghton, Mifflin & Co,, 
1890. (October.) 
Regular Holiday Edition. w 



[ 100 ] 

The Same: with biography, critical opinions, and 
notes. New York: Maynard, Merrill & Co,, 
1894. 

16mo, Portrait. 

English Classic Series, no. 129. 

The Vision of Sir Launfal. Edited, with notes, 
etc. Boston: Leach, Shewell & Sanborn, 1896. 
16mo. 
Students' series of English Classics. 

The Vision of Sir Launfal, and Other 
Poems. Introduction by H. Bates. New York: 
Macmillan, 1900. 
18mo. 
Pocket American Classics. 

The Same. Notes by F. R. Lane. New York: 
Allyn & Bacon, 1900. 
12mo. 

The Same. Biography and notes, by Margaret 
H. McCarter. Topeka: Crane & Co., 1904. 

Aid to the Study and Teaching of the 
Vision of Sir Launfal, by Graham. San 
Francisco : Whitaker & Ray, 

The Vision of Sir Launfal, and Other 
Poems. With biographical sketch, notes, and 
illustrations. Boston: Houghton, Mifflin & Co,, 
1906. 

16mo, pp. xviii, 96. 
Riverside School Library. 



[101] 

Contents 
A Sketch of the Life of James Russell Lowell 
I. Elmwood 
II. Education 

III. First Ventures 

IV. Verse and Prose 
V. Public Life 

Introductory Note 

The Vision of Sir Launfal 

Prelude to Part First 

Part First 

Prelude to Part Second 

Part Second 
Ode Recited at the Harvard Commemoration 
On Board the '76 
An Indian-Summer Reverie 
The First Snow-Fail 
The Oak 
Prometheus 
To W. L. Garrison 
Wendell Phillips 

Mr. Hosea Biglow to the Editor of the Atlantic Monthly 
Villa Franca 

The Nightingale in the Study 
Aladdin 
Beaver Brook 

The Shepherd of KiDg Admetus 
The Present Crisis 
Al Fresco 
The Foot-Path 

Notices and Criticisms. 
Orestes A. Brownson, Brownson's Quarterly Review, April, 

1849, V. 6, p. 265. Brownson's Works, v. 19, p. 308. 
R. C. Pitman, Methodist Quarterly Review, January, 1850, 

Fourth series, v. 2, p. 107. 
Littell's Living Age, April 20, 1867, v. 93, p. 179. 
Poet-Lore, January, 1894, v. 6, p. 47. 

Auction Sale Prices. First Edition. 
Arnold, January, 1901, $35. 
Bangs, January, 1902, $19. 



|]102] 

Presentation Copy, January, 1903, $115. 
Somerby, December, 1903, $13. 
Anderson, December, 1905, $40. 
Denny, January, 1906, $26. 
Pyser, February, 1906, $31. 
Merwin-Clayton, New York, February, 1906, 



POEMS, 1849 

Poems. By James Russell Lowell. In two Vol- 
umes. Vol. I. Boston: Ticknor, Reed and Fields, 

MDCCCXLIX. 

16mo, vol. i, pp. xii, 251; vol. ii, pp. vii, 254, 
boards. 

[viii] This edition is a revised one, but as the volumes which form 
the substance of it had been stereotyped, it was found easier to 
cancel than to correct. Accordingly several poems and parts of 
poems have been left out of the first volume, and their places sup- 
pUed in most instances by selections from an earlier volume, pub- 
lished in 1841. These intercalated pieces will be found sufficiently 
designated by the dates appended to each. 

The second volume has been made correspondent in size with 
its fellows, by the addition of some poems more lately written. 

Contents of vol. i. 
A Legend of Brittany 

Parti 

Partn 
Miscellaneous Poems 

Threnodia 

The Sirens 

Serenade 

Irene 

Prometheus 

Song, "Violet! sweet violet!" 

Rosaline 

Allegra 

The Fountain 



[103] 

With a Pressed Flower 
The Beggar 

The Shepherd of King Admetus 
The Token 

An Incident in a Railroad Car 
Rhcecus 
The Falcon 
My Love 
Trial 

A Requiem 
The Fatherland 
A Parable 
Love 

To Perdita, singing 

Ode " In the old days of awe and keen-eyed wonder 
The Moon 

A Glance behind the Curtain 
The Forlorn 

Song "O moonlight deep and tender '* 
Midnight 
A Prayer 

To the Memory of Hood 
The Heritage 
The Rose: a Ballad 
Elegy on the Death of Dr. Channing 
Stanzas sung at the Anti-Slavery Picnic in Dedham 
Thistle-downs 
A Chippewa Legend 
Sonnets 

I. "Through suffering and sorrow** 

II. "What were I, Love** 

m. "I would not have this perfect love** 

rv. "For this true nobleness** 
V. To the Spu-it of Keats 

VI. "Great Truths are portions of the soul** 
VII. "I ask not for those thoughts** 
Vin. To , on her birthday 

rx. "My Love, I have no fear** 
X. "I cannot think that thou" 

XI. " There never yet was flower ** 



[i 104 ] 

xn. Sub pondere crescit 
xra. "Beloved, in the noisy city here" 
XIV. On reading Wordsworth's Sonnets in Defence of 

Capital Punishment 

XV. The Same, continued 

XVI. The Same, continued 

xvn. The Same, continued 

xvm. The Same, continued 

XIX. The Same, concluded 

XX. To , Mary, since first I knew thee, to this 

hour 
XXI. "Our love is not a fading, earthly flower " 
xxn. In Absence 
xxra. Wendell Phillips 
XXIV. The Street 

XXV. "I grieve not that ripe knowledge" 
XXVI. To J. R. Giddings 
xxvn. "I thought our love at full" 
L'Envoi 

Contents op vol. n 
Colimibus 

An Incident of the Fire at Hamburg 
The Sower 
Himger and Cold 
The Landlord 
To a Pine-Tree 

Si descendero in Infernum, ades 
To the Past 
To the Future 
Hebe 

The Search 
The Present Crisis 
Summer Storm 
The Growth of tlie Legend 
A Contrast 
Extreme Unction 
The Oak 
Ambrose 
Above and Below 



[105] 

The Captive 

The Birch-Tree 

An Interview with Miles Standish 

On the Capture of Certain Fugitive Slaves near Wash- 
ington 

On the Death of Charles T. Torrey 

Remembered Music 

Song: to M. L. 

To the Dandelion 

The Ghost-Seer 

The Morning-Glory 

Studies for Two Heads 

On a Portrait of Dante by Giotto 

On the Death of a Friend's Child 

Eurydice 

She Came and Went 

To W. L. Garrison 

The Changeling 

An Indian-Summer Reverie 

The Pioneer 

Longing^ 

The Vision of Sir Launfal 

Ode to France 

Kossuth 

To Lamartine 

A Parable 

Ode written for the Celebration of the Introduction of the 
Cochituate Water into the City of Boston 

Lines suggested by the Graves of two English Soldiers on 
Concord Battle-Ground 

To . "We, too, have autumns, when our leaves" 

Freedom 

Bibliolatres 

Beaver Brook 

To John G. Palfrey 



[ 106 ] 

Poems. London: Routledge, 1851-52. 
12mo and 18mo editions. 

Notices and Criticisms. 
Literary World, January 12, 1850, v. 6, p. 35. 
Brownson's Quarterly Review, April, 1850, v. 4 n. s.,p. 271. 

Auction Sale Prices. First Edition. 
Arnold, January, 1901, $12.50. 
Bangs, February, 1901, $21. 
Libbie, March, 1901, $21. 
Peirce, May, 1903, $13. 
Anderson, January, 1904, $6.20. 
French and Chubbuck, February, 1904, $5. 
Libbie, June, 1904, with inserted letter, $10. 
Anderson, March, 1905, $6. 

POEMS OF MARIA LOWELL 

The Poems of Maria Lowell. Cambridge: 
Privately Printed, 1855. 

Square 12mo, pp. vi, 68, cloth* "Poems by 
Maria Lowell" printed in gilt on front cover; 
gilt edges. Portrait opposite title-page, from 
a drawing by Seth Cheney after the painting 
by William Page. ^ 

Only 50 copies were printed, for distribution to Mrs. 
Lowell's friends. 

[iii] To Emelyn Story, Mary Lowell Putnam, and Sarah B. 

Shaw, this book is dedicated. 
Contents 

The Maiden's Harvest 

Song 

The Alpine Sheep 

Africa 

Jesus and the Dove 

The Morning-Glory 



[107] 

The Slave-Mother 

Necklaces 

Cadiz 

Kome 

The Grave of Keats 

Avignon 

Rouen, Place de la Pucelle 

The Sick-Room 

An Opium Fantasy 

Sonnet 

Sonnet 

Sonnet 

Sonnet 

Memories of Waters 

Notices and Criticisms. 
Poet-Lore, January, 1898, v. 10, p. 19. "Mrs. Lowell's 

* Africa.'" 
Poet-Lore, v. 10, pp. 19, 22. "Mrs. Lowell's Poems," 

by Caroline Healy Dall. 

Auction Sale Prices. 
Arnold, January, 1890, $90. 
McKee, November, 1900, $87. 
Bangs, April, 1901, $95. 
Bartlett, May, 1903, presentation copy, $210. 
Anderson, December, 1904, $35. 
Knapp, February, 1905, $60. 
Pyser, February, 1906, $85. 

FIRESIDE TRAVELS 
Fireside Travels. By James Russell Lowell. 

" Travelling makes a man sit still in his old age with sat- 
isfaction, and travel over the world again in his chair and bed 
by discourse and thoughts." 

The Voyage of Italy, by Richard Lassels, Gent. 

[Publishers' monogram.] Boston: Ticknor and 
Fields, 1864 [August]. 
16mo, pp. [x], 324, cloth. 



i 108 ] 

[iii] To W. W. S[tort]. 

Who carves his thoughts in marble will not scorn 
These pictured bubbles, if so far they fly; 
They will recall days ruddy but with mom. 
Not red like those late past or drawing nigh! 

[v] The greater part of this volume was printed ten years ago in 
"Putnam's Monthly" and "Graham's Magazine." The addi- 
tions (most of them about Italy) have been made up, as the original 
was, from old letters and journals written on the spot. My wish 
was to describe not so much what I went to see, as what I saw 
that was most unlike what one sees at home. If the reader find 
entertainment, he will find all I hoped to give him. 

Contents : 
Cambridge Thirty Years Ago 
A Moosehead Journal 
Letters from my Journal in Italy and Elsewhere 

At Sea 

In the Mediterranean 

Italy 

A few Bits of Roman Mosaic 

A list of Lowell 's books is printed opposite the title-page. 
At the end is the "List of Books published by Ticknor and 
Fields," dated September, 1864, 22 pp., followed by an ad- 
vertisement of the Atlantic Monthly. 

The Same. By James Russell Lowell, Author of 
"The Biglow Papers." London and Cam- 
bridge: Macmillan & Co., 1864. 
12mo, pp. 341. 

A Moosehead Journal, At Sea. Boston: James 
R. Osgood & Co.y 1877. 
32mo, illustrated, pp. 75. 
Vest Pocket Series. 



[109] 

Fireside Travels. Boston: Houghton, Mifflin 
& Co., 1885. 

Riverside Aldine Series, no. 3. 

The Same. Boston: Houghton, Mifflin & Co,, 
1897. 

16mo, pp. 282. 
Riverside Aldine Series. 

The Same. Boston: Houghton, Mifflin & Co., 
1899 [September, 1898]. 
Crown 8vo, pp. 324, gilt top. 
Cambridge Classics. 

Notices and Criticisms. 

Christian Examiner, November, 1864, v. 77, p. 376. 
Spectator, October 8, 1864, v. 37, p. 1157. 
Athensemn, November 12, 1864, p. 629. 

Auction Sale Prices. First Edition. 
French and Chubbuck, February, 1904, $3.50. 
Knapp, February, 1905, $3.25. 

Smalley, April, 1905, Charles Dickens copy of 1865 edition, 
$6.75. 

THE PRESIDENT'S POLICY 

No. 16. The President's Policy. By James 
Russell Lowell. From the North American 
Review. [Philadelphia: Printed by Crissy & 
Markley for the Union League of Philadelphia, 
1864.] ' 

8vo, pp. 22, paper. 

Two editions of this pamphlet were printed, both in 
Philadelphia by the Union League in its numbered series 
of pamphlets. 



[ 110 ] 

Notices and Criticisms. 

Lincoln's Complete Works, edition of Nicolay and Hay, 
V. 2, p. 470. 

North American Review, April, 1864, v. 98, p. 630. 

The Bibliographer, "A Rare Lowell Item," June, 1902, v. 1, 
p. 233. 

Theodore Wesley Koch, "Lowell's Pamphlet, *The Presi- 
dent's PoKcy,' 1864," The Bibliographer, February, 1903, 
V. 2, p. 107. 

Auction Sale Prices. 
Anderson, December, 1903, $55, 
Anderson, January, 1904, $49. 
Anderson, January, 1905, $41. 
Knapp, February, 1905, $78. 

COMMEMORATION ODE 

Ode Recited at the Commemoration of the 
Living and Dead Soldiers of Harvard 
University, July 21, 1865. Cambridge: Pri- 
vately Printed, 1865. 

8vo, boards, paper label, gilt top. 

Only 50 copies printed, for Lowell's use. 

Auction Sale Prices. 
Libbie, May, 1900, $60. 

Arnold, January, 1901, presentation copy to F. H. Under- 
wood, $220. 
French, April, 1901, presentation to John Bartlett, $410. 
Whipple, April, 1903, presentation copy, $400. 
Pyser, January, 1906, 



THE BIGLOW PAPERS. SECOND SERIES 

Meliboeus-Hipponax. The Biglow Papers. 
Second Series. [There follow quotations from 
Longinus, Montaigne, Fischart, Quintilianus, 



[Ill] 

and Jasmin, as given in all editions. Also 
monogram of the Publishers.] Boston: James 
R. Osgood and Company, late Ticknor & Fields, 
and Fields, Osgood & Co,, 1867. [October, 
1866.] 

16mo, pp. Ixxx, 258, cloth. 

On reverse of title-page appear quotations from Quin- 
tiKanus, Cronica Jocelini, and Henri Beyle, which follow 
those mentioned above as appearing in all editions. 

[i] To E. R. Hoar 

The introduction, pp. [v]-lxxvi, is devoted to an essay 
on the Yankee form of the English speech; and pp. 
Ixxvii-lxxx contain "The Courtin'*' in its completed 
form. 

Contents 
Introduction 
The Courtin' 

No. I. Birdofredmn Sawin, Esq., to Mr. Hosea Biglow 
No. n. Mason and Slidell: A Yankee Idyll 
No. III. Birdofredum Sawin, Esq., to Mr. Hosea Biglow 
No. IV. A Message of Jeff Davis in Secret Session 
No. V. Speech of Honourable Preserved Doe in Secret 

Caucus 
No. VI. Sunthin' in the Pastoral Line 
No. VII. Latest Views of Mr. Biglow 
No. Vin. Kettelopotomachia 
No. .IX. Table-Talk 
No. X. Mr. Hosea Biglow to the Editor of the Atlantic 

Monthly 
No. XI. Mr. Hosea Biglow*s Speech in March Meeting 
Index 

The Same, Second Series, Parts 1 to 3. Lon- 
don: Trilbner, 1862. 
12mo. 



[112] 

The Same. Notes and Introduction by the editor 
of Artemus Ward; colored illustrations by 
George Cruikshank. London: Hotteriy 1865. 
16mo, gilt top. 

The Same. Montreal: R. Worthington, 1866. 
8vo, pp. xii, 55, double columns. 

Yankee Drolleries. First and Second Series. 
The most celebrated works of the best Ameri- 
can humorists. With an introduction by George 
Augustus Sala. London: Routledge, 1867. 

These volumes contain respectively the two series of 
the Biglow Papers. 

The Biglow Papers. Both Series. London: 
HoUen, 1877. Introduction by George Augus- 
tus Sala. 

The Same. Both Series. Preface by Thomas 
Hughes. London: Truhner, 1880. 
Post 8vo, cloth. 

The Same. Boston: Houghton, Mifflin and Co,, 
1885. 
16mo, pp. vi, 193; viii, 199. 
Riverside Aldine Series, nos. 8 and 9; the two series 
of the Biglow Papers. 

The Same. London: Routledge, 1886. 
16mo, pp. 384. 
"Routledge's Pocket Library." 

The Russell Lowell (Hosea Biglow) Birth- 
day Book. London: Routledge, 1887. 
16mo, pp. 288. 



[113] 

The Biglow Papers. Boston: HoughtoUy Mif- 
flin and Co., January, 1891. 

The Same. Boston: Houghton, Mifflin and Co., 
1894. 

Crown 8vo, pp. 564; crimson cloth, gilt top. 
Cambridge Classics. 

The Same. Boston: Houghton, Mifflin and Co., 
1896. 
New edition. 

Humorous Books. The Biglow Papers. Com- 
plete edition, reprinted from the original. Lon- 
don: Routledge, 1898. 
12mo, pp. 96. 

Autograph Leaves of Our Country's 
Authors. Baltimore: Cushing & Bailey, 1864. 
4to, pp. xi, 200, cloth. 

In this book, issued by the Sanitary Commission Fair, 
edited by John P. Kennedy and Alexander Bliss, " The 
Courtin' " first appeared in its completed form, as after- 
wards published in the second series. " The Courtin' " 
is on pp. 107-112. 

The Courtin'. Boston: James R. Osgood and 
Co., 1874. [December 1, 1873.] Illustrated in 
silhouette by Winslow Homer. 
4to, plates. 

Notices and Criticisms. 
Spectator, "The New Biglow Papers," October 1, 1864, 

V. 37, p. 1133. 
J. R. Dennett, The Nation, November 15, 1866, v. 3, p. 386. 



E 114 ] 

Littell's Living Age, "Yankee Humor," March 16, 1866, 

V. 92, p. 681. 
William Dean Howells, Atlantic Monthly, January, 1867, 

V. 19, p. 123. 
British Quarterly Review, "American Humor," October, 

1870, V. 52, p. 324. 
Atlantic Monthly, "The Courtin'," February, 1874, v. 33, 

p. 235. 
Cornhill, "Mr. Lowell's Poems," January, 1875, v. 31, p. 65. 
Hugh Reginald Haweis, American Humorists, 1882. 
Joseph Heniy Gilmore, Chautauquan, April, 1896, v. 23, 

p. 19. 

Auction Sale Prices. First Edition. 
Arnold, January, 1901, John Fiske's copy, $11. 
French, April, 1901, presentation copy, $70. 
Peirce, May, 1903, presentation copy, $60. 
Libbie, June, 1904, $31. 
Merwin-Clayton, March 3, 1905, $5.50. 
Gordon, April, 1905, $3. 

UNDER THE WILLOWS 

Under the Willows and Other Poems. By 
James Russell Lowell. Boston: Fields^ Os- 
good & Co., successors to Ticknor and Fields, 
1869. [November, 1868.] 

12mo, pp. [vi], 286, cloth, vignette of willow 
in gilt on front cover; same as blind stamp on 
back cover. 

"Erratum" slip opposite page 286. 

[iii]-v. To Charles Eliot Norton, Agro Dolce, 
[vi] [*** No collection of the author's poems has been made since 
1848, and some of those in this volume date back even farther 
than that. All but two of the shortest have been printed before, 
either wholly or in part. As the greater number, however, were 



[115] 

published more than fifteen years ago, they will have, perhaps, 
something of novelty to most readers. A few pieces, more strictly 
comic, have been omitted, as out of keeping; and "Fitz Adam's 
Story," which some good friends will miss, is also left to stand 
over, because it belongs to a connected series, which, it is hoped, 
may be completed if the days should be propitious.] 

Contents 
Under the Willows 
Dara 

The First Snow-Fall 
The Singing Leaves 
Sea-Weed 

The Finding of the Lyre 
New-Year's Eve, 1850 
For an Autograph x 

Al Fresco 
Masaccio 

Without and Within 
Godminster Chimes 
The Parting of the Ways 
Aladdin 
An Livitation 
The Nomades 
Self-Study 

Pictures iFrom Appledore 
The Wind-Harp 
Auf Wiedersehen! 
Palinode 
After the Burial 
The Dead House 
A Mood 

The Voyage to Vinland 
Mahmood the Image-Breaker 
Invita Minerva 
The Fountain of Youth 
Yussouf 

The Darkened Mind 
What Rabbi Jehosha said 
All-Saints 



[ 116 ] 

A Winter-Evening Hymn to my Fire 

Fancy's Casuistry 

To Mr. John Bartlett 

Ode to Happiness 

Villa Franca 

The Miner 

Gold Egg: A Dream-Fantasy 

A Familiar Epistle to a Friend 

An Ember Picture 

ToH. W. L. 

The Nightingale in the Study 

In the Twilight 

The Foot-Path 

Poems of the War 

The Washers of the Shroud 

Two Scenes from the Life of Blondel 

Memorise Positiun 

On Board the '76 

Ode Kecited at the Harvard Commemoration 
L'Envoi — To the Muse 

Notices and Criticisms. 
William Dean Howells, Atlantic Monthly, February, 1869, 

V. 23, p. 262. 
Spectator, "Mr. Lowell's Poems," February 6, 1869, v. 42, 

p. 168. 
Athenaeum, April 17, 1869, p. 5S1. 

Auction Sale Prices. 
French, April, 1901, $20. Another, presentation copy, $26. 
Whipple, April, 1903, presentation copy, $27.50. 
French and Chubbuck, February, 1904, $3.50. 



THE CATHEDRAL 

The Cathedral. By James Russell Lowell. 
[Publishers' monogram.] Boston: Fields, Os- 
good & Co., 1870. [December, 1869.] 
16mo, pp. 53, cloth. 



[ 117 ] 

The Cathedral was published in the Atlantic Monthly, 
January, 1870, v. 25, p. 1; and it was included in the Poetical 
Works of 1877. 

The Cathedral and the Harvard Commemo- 
ration Ode. Boston: James R. Osgood & Co.y 
1877. 
32mo, pp. 96, cloth. Illustrations. 
Vest Pocket Series. 

Notices and Criticisms. 
William Cleaver Wilkinson, Baptist Quarterly, v. 4, p. 374; 

Hours at Home, v. 10, p. 541. 
J. R. Dennett, Nation, January 27, 1870, v. 10, p. 60. 

Auction Sale Prices. First edition. 
Whipple, April, 1903, presentation copy, $47.50. 
Anderson, March, 1904, $10. 

AMONG MY BOOKS 

Among My Books. By James Russell Lowell, 
A. M., Professor of Belles-Lettres in Harvard 
College. Boston: Fields^ Osgood & Co., 1870. 
[February.] 

12mo, pp. [vi], 380, cloth. 

[iii] To F. L. D. 

Love comes and goes with music in his feet, 

And tunes young pulses to his roundelays: 
Love brings thee this: will it persuade thee, Sweet, 

That he turns proser when he comes and stays ? 

Contents' 
Dryden 
Witchcraft 

Shakespeare Once More 
New England Two Centuries Ago 
Lessing 
Rousseau and the SentimentaHsts 



[118] 

The Same. Six Essays. By J. Russell Lowell. 
London: Macmillan, 1870. 
Notices and Criticisms. 
Athenseum, March 19, 1870, p. 379. 

George W. W. Durgee, Nation, April 21, 1870, v. 10, p. 258. 
William Dean Howells, Atlantic Monthly, June, 1870, v. 25, 

p. 757. 
Academy, July 9, 1870, v. 1, p. 252. 

Auction Sale Prices. First edition. 
Bangs, March, 1901, $5.66. 
Appleton, April, 1903, $11. 
French and Chubbuck, February, 1904, $3.75. 
Anderson, March, 1904, $4.50. 
Libbie, June, 1904, $12.12. 

MY STUDY WINDOWS 
My Study Windows. By James Russell Lowell, 
A. M., Professor of Belles-Lettres in Harvard 
College. [Publishers' monogram.] Boston: 
James R. Osgood & Co., late Ticknor and 
Fields, and Fields, Osgood & Co,, 1871. [Jan- 
uary 20.] 

12mo, pp. [vi], 433, cloth. 

[iii] Prefatory Note. 

My former volume of Essays has been so kindly received that 
I am emboldened to make another and more miscellaneous col- 
lection. The papers here gathered have been written at intervals 
during the last fifteen years, and I knew no way so effectual to 
rid my mind of them and make ready for a new departure, as 
this of shutting them between two covers where they can haunt 
me, at least, no more. I should have preferred a simpler title, 
but publishers nowadays are inexorable on this point, and I was 
too much occupied for happiness of choice. That which I have 
desperately snatched is meant to imply both the books within 
and the world without, and perhaps may pass muster in the case 
of one who has always found his most fruitful study in the 
open air. 



[ 119 ] 

[iv] To Professor F. J. Child 

My dear Child, — 

You were good enough to like my Essay on Chaucer (about 
whom you know so much more than I), and I shall accordingly 
so far presume upon our long friendship as to inscribe the vol- 
ume containing it with your name. 

Always heartily yours, 

J. R. Lowell. 
Cambridge, Christmas, 1870. 

Contents 
My Garden Acquaintance 
A Good Word for Winter 
On a Certain Condescension in Foreigners 
A Great PubHc Character 
Carlyle 

Abraham Lincoln 

The Life and Letters of James Gates Percival 
Thoreau 

Swinburne's Tragedies 
Chaucer 

Library of Old Authors 
Emerson, the Lecturer 
Pope 

The Same. London: Sampsouy Low & Co., 
1871. 
16mo. 
In "Low's Copyright Series of American Authors." 

The Same. 1874. 
8vo. 
In Rose Library. 

The Same. With an Introduction by Richard 
Gamett,LL.D. London: Walter Scott, 1SS7. 
16mo, pp. xvi, 378. 
In Camelot series; also in Shilling series. 
Notices and Criticisms. 
Athenceum, April 22, 1871, p. 490. 



Spectator, May 13, 1871, v. 44, p. 579. 
William Dean Howells, Atlantic Monthly, June, 1871, v. 
27, p. 778. 

Auction Sale Prices. First Edition. 
Bangs, May, 1900, $10. 
French, April, 1901, presentation copy, $45. 
Whipple, April, 1903, presentation copy, $30. 
French and Chubbuck, February, 1904, $3.50. 

AMONG MY BOOKS 

Among My Books. Second Series. By James 
Russell Lowell, Professor of Belles-Lettres in 
Harvard College. [Publishers' monogram.] 
Boston: James R. Osgood <& Co.^ late Ticknor 
& Fieldsy and Fields, Osgood & Co., 1876. [De- 
cember, 1875.] 

12mo, pp. [vi], 827, cloth. 

[iii] To R. W. Emerson 

A love and honor which more than thirty years have deep- 
ened, though priceless to him they enrich, are of little import to 
one capable of inspiring them. Yet I cannot deny myseK the 
pleasure of so far intruding on your reserve as at least to make 
public my acknowledgment of the debt I can never repay. 

Contents 
Dante 
Spenser 
Wordsworth 
Milton 
Keats. 

The Same. Second Series. London: Sampson, 
Snow & Co., 1876. 
Post 8vo. 

Notices and Criticisms. 
Scribner*s Magazine, v. 11, p. 747. 



[m] 

Century, Culture and Progress, v. 11, p. 747. 

Edward Dowden, Academy, March 11, 1876, v. 9, p. 232. 

William Dean Howells, Atlantic Monthly, April, 1876, v. 

37, p. 493. 
Spectator, July 22, 1876, v. 49, p. 925. 

Auction Sale Pkices. First Edition. 
Arnold, January, 1901, $16. 
French and Chubbuck, February, 1904, $8. 
Libbie, March, 1904, $3.25. 
Anderson, March, 1905, $3.62. 
Pyser, February, 1906, $23. Same copy as above. 



THREE MEMORIAL POEMS 

Three Memorial Poems. By James Russell 
Lowell. Eis olcovos apwrros ai^vvecai irepl 
TToiTprjs* Boston: James R. Osgood & Co., late 
Ticknor & Fields, and Fields, Osgood & Co., 
1877. [December, 1876.] 
16mo, pp. [13]-9^, cloth. 

[8] Sonnet of dedication. 

Contents 

Ode Read at Concord, April 19, 1875 

Under the Old Elm 

An Ode for the Fourth of July, 1876 

Notices and Criticisms. 
William Dean Howells, Atlantic Monthly, March, 1877, 

V. 39, p. 374. 
James Vila Blake, Radical Eeview, May, 1877, v. 1, p. 174. 

Auction Sale Prices. 
Arnold, January, 1901, letter inserted, $6.50. 



[ 122 ] 
THE ROSE 

The Rose. By James Russell Lowell. With 
Illustrations. [Publishers' vignette.] Boston: 
James R. Osgood & Co., 1878. 

Square 12mo, not paged ; cloth. 

First separate edition. 

ON DEMOCRACY 

Birmingham and Midland Institute. On De- 
mocracy: An Address delivered in the Town 
Hall, Birmingham, on the 6th of October, 
1884. By His Excellency, The Hon. James 
Russell Lowell, D. C. L., LL. D., American 
Minister in London, President. Birmingham: 
Printed by Coud Bros,, Paternoster Row, 
Moor Street, 1884. 

Democracy and Other Addresses. By James 
Russell Lowell. [Publishers' vignette.] Boston 
and New York: Houghton, Mifflin & Co,, The 
Riverside Press, Cambridge, 1887. [November, 
1886.] 
- 16mo, pp. vi, 245, cloth. 

[iii] To G. W. Smalley, Esq. 

My deak Smalley, — You heard several of these Addresses 
delivered, and were good enough to think better of them than 
I did. As this was one of my encouragements to repeat them 
before a larger audience, perhaps you will accept the dedication , 
of the volume which contains them. 

Faithfully yours, 

J. R. Lowell. 
Deerfoot Farm, November 10, 1886. 



O 123 ] 

Contents 
Democracy 
Garfield 
Stanley 
Fielding 
Coleridge 

Books and Libraries 
Wordsworth 
Don Quixote 
Harvard University 

Democracy and Other Addresses. London: 
Macmillan^ 1887. 

Democracy and Other Papers. With Notes. 

Boston, Houghton, Mifflin & Company, 1898. 

18mo, pp. 95, paper, cloth. 

Riverside Literature Series, no. 123. 

Contents 
Democracy 

On a Certain Condescension in Foreigners 
The Study of Modern Languages 

Democracy: An Essay. With an Introductory 
Note by Horace E. Scudder. Boston: Hough- 
ton, Mifflin & Co,, 1902. [March.] 
Limited edition, 16mo, boards. 

Notices and Criticisms. 
Nation, "Mr. Lowell's New Volume," December 23, 1886, 

V. 43, p. 525. 
George E. Woodberry, "Mr. Lowell's Addresses," Atlantic 

Monthly, February, 1887, v. 59, p. 257. 
Spectator, February 26, 1887, v. 60, p. 299. 
Walter Lewin, Academy, March 19, 1887, v. 31, p. 196. 

Auction Sale Prices: On Democracy, Birmingham, 1884. 
Arnold, January, 1901, $70. Another copy, $110. 
Bangs, November, 1902, $40. 
Bangs, January, 1903, $25. 



[ 124 ] 

Peirce, May, 1903, $55, 

Somerby, December, 1903, $17.50. 

Pattison, October, 1904, $14. 

Pyser, February, 1906, $50. 

Democracy and Other Addresses, 

Anderson, October, 1904, $3.75. 

Anderson, April, 1905, $4.50. Boston, 1886. 

BOOKS AND LIBRARIES AND OTHER PAPERS 

Books and Libraries and other Papers. With 

Notes. Boston : Houghton, Mifflin & Company, 

1888. 

18ino, pp. 82, paper, cloth. 

Riverside Literature Series, no. 39. 

Contents 
Books and Libraries 
Emerson, the Lecturer 
Keats 
Don Quixote 

THE INDEPENDENT IN POLITICS 

The Independent in Politics. An Address 
before the Reform Club of New York, April 
13, 1888. [Reform Club Series, -i.]. New 
York: The Reform Club, 1888. 
12mo, pp. 27, paper, cloth. 

Questions of the Day Series, - no. xlviii. The 
Independent in Politics. By James Rus- 
sell Lowell. New York: Putnams, 1888. 
12mo, pp. 27, paper, cloth. 

Auction Sale Prices. 
Arnold, January, 1901, large paper ed., $14. 
Anderson, Jannaiy, 1905, $3.85. 



ns ] 

POLITICAL ESSAYS 

Political Essays. By James Russell Lowell. 
[Publishers' vignette.] Boston and New York: 
Houghton, Mifflin & Co,, The Riverside Press, 
Cambridge, 1888. [July.] 
12mo, pp. [vi], 326, cloth. 

[iii] Prefatory Note 

I have been often urged to reprint the articles which form the 
bulk of this volume, by persons who had found them interesting 
at the time of their first pubhcation, as well as by others who had 
read them more recently and thought them of some interest 
even now. I have steadily refused to do what was asked of me, 
because the greater part of what is here gathered together seemed 
to me to have mainly a polemic value contemporaneous with the 
date at which it was written. I have (I know not how wisely) 
allowed myself to be persuaded that there was also in these 
papers a certain historical interest as recalKng aspects of our 
politics which perhaps it may be useful not wholly to forget. In 
looking at them again, after so long an interval (for the latest of 
them is more than twenty years old), it gratifies me to find so 
little to regret in their tone, and that I was able to keep my head 
fairly clear of passion when my heart was at boiling-point. 

Contents 
The American Tract Society 
The Election in November 
E Pluribus Unum 

The Pickens-and-Stealin's Rebelhon 
General McClellan's Report 
The Rebelhon: Its Causes and Consequences 
McClellan or Lincoln ? 
Reconstruction 
Scotch the Snake, or Kill it ? 
The President on the Stump 
The Seward-Johnson Reaction 
The Place of the Independent in Politics 



[126] 

Political Essays. London: Macmillan, 1888. 
Printed at The Riverside Press, new title-page. 

Notices and Criticisms. 
Nation, "Mr. Lowell's PoHtical Philosophy," May 17, 1888, 

V. 47, p. 111. 
Horace E. Scudder, "Mr. Lowell's PoKtics," Atlantic 

Monthly, August, 1888, v. 62, p. 274. 
Walter Lewin, Academy, August 18, 1888, v. 34, p. 95. 
Critic, September 8, 1888, v. 10, p. 111. 

HEARTSEASE AND RUE 

Heartsease and Rue. By James Russell Low- 
ell. [Riverside Press vignette.] Boston and 
New York: Houghton, Mifflin and Company, 
The Riverside Press, Cambridge, 1888. [Feb- 
ruary.] 

16mo, pp. viii, 218, boards and half imita- 
tion vellum. 

[iii] Along the wayside where we pass bloom few 

Gay plants of heartsease, more of saddening rue; 
So life is mingled; so should poems be 
That speak a conscious word to you and me. 

Contents 
I. Feiendship 
Agassiz 

To Holmes on his Seventy-jfifth Birthday 
In a Copy of Omar Khayyam 
On receiving a Copy of Mr. Austin Dobson's "Old 

World Idylls" 
To C. F. Bradford on the Gift of a Meerschaum Pipe 
Bankside 
Joseph Winlock 
Sonnet. To Fanny Alexander 
Jeffries Wyman 



[1 127 ] 

To a Friend 

With an Armchair 

E. G. de R. 

Bon Voyage! 

To Whittier on his Seventy-fifth Birthday 

On an Autumn Sketch of H. G. Wild 

To Miss D. T. 

With a Copy of Aucassin and Nicolete 

On Planting a Tree at Inveraray 

An Epistle to George William Curtis 

II. Sentiment 
Endymion 
The Black Preacher 
Arcadia Rediviva 
The Nest 

A Youthful Experiment in English Hexameters 
Birthday Verses 
Estrangement 
Phoebe 

Das Ewig-Weibliche 
The Recall 
Absence 
Mona Lisa 
The Optimist 

On Burning some old Letters 
The Protest 
The Petition 
Fact or Fancy? 
Agro-Dolce 
The Broken Tryst 
Casa sin Ahna 
A Christmas Carol 
My Portrait Gallery 
Paolo to Francesca 
Sonnet. Scottish Border 

Sonnet. On being asked for an Autograph in Venice 
The Dancing Bear 
The Maple 
Nightwatches 
Death of Queen Mercedes 



[ 128] 

Prison of Cervantes 

To a Lady playing on a Cithem 

The Eye's Treasury 

Pessimoptimism 

The Brakes 

A Foreboding 

III. Fancy 

Under the October Maples 

Love's Clock 

Eleanor makes Macaroons 

Telepathy 

Scherzo 

"Franciscus de Verulamio sic Cogitavit" 

Auspex 

The Pregnant Comment 

The Lesson 

Science and Poetry 

A New Year's Greeting 

The Discovery 

With a Seashell 

The Secret 

IV. Humor and Satire 

Fitz Adam's Story 

The Origin of Didactic Poetry 

The Flying Dutchman 

Credidimus Jovem Regnare 

Tempora Mutantur 

In the Half-way House 

At the Bums Centennial 

In an Album 

At the Conunencement Dinner, 1866 

A Parable 

V. Epigrams 

Sayings 

Inscriptions 
For a Bell at Cornell University 
For a Memorial Window to Sir Walter Raleigh 
Proposed for a Soldiers' and Sailors' Monument in 
Boston 



[ 129 ] 

A Misconception 

The Boss 

Sun-worship 

Changed Perspective 

With a Pair of Gloves lost in a Wager 

Sixty-eighth Birthday 

The Same. London: Macmillan, 1888. 
Printed at The Riverside Press 

Notices and Criticisms. 

Critic, March 31, 1888, v. 6, p. 150. 

Walter Lewin, Academy, March 31, 1888, v. 33, p. 216. 

George E. Woodberry, "Mr. Lowell's New Poems," 
Atlantic Monthly, April, 1888, v. 61, p. 557. 

Nation, "Recent Poetry," May 17, 1888, v. 46, p. 406. 
Auction Sale Prices. First Edition. 

Anderson, May, 1905, with autograph, $32. 

LATEST LITERARY ESSAYS AND ADDRESSES 

Latest Literary Essays and Addresses of 
James Russell Lowell. [Riverside Press 
vignette.] Boston and New York; Houghton, 
Mifflin iSc Co., 1892. November, [1891.] 
16mo, pp. [vi], 184, cloth, portrait. 

[iii] Note 

The publication in a volume of the following Essays and Ad- 
dresses is in accordance with the intention of their author. Most 
of them had been revised by him with this end in view. The only 
one of them concerning which there is doubt, whether he would 
have published it in its present form, is the paper on "Richard 
III." With this he was not satisfied, and he hesitated in regard 
to printing it. It has seemed to me of interest enough to warrant 
its pubhcation. 

The essay on Gray was in large part written more than ten 
years before it was printed in the "New Princeton Review," in 
1880. The essay on the "Areopagitica " was written at the 
request of the GroUer Club, of New York, for an introduction to 



C130] 

an edition of the work specially printed for the Club. I am in- 
debted to the Club for permission to include it in this volume.^ 

Charles Eliot Norton. 
Cambridge, Massachusetts^ 
16 November, 1891. 

Contents 
Gray 

Some Letters of Walter Savage Landor 
Walton 

Milton's "Areopagitica " 
Shakespeare's "Richard III " 
The Study of Modern Languages \ 

The Progress of the World 

A limited edition of 300 copies was printed from these 
plates in 1891; portrait on India paper; cloth back, 
paper label. 

Notices and Criticisms. 
Critic, January 11, 1892, v. 17, p. 31. 
Nation, May 12, 1892, v. 54, p. 364. 

Auction Sale Prices. 
Arnold, January, 1901, large paper ed., $15. 
Bangs, December, 1901, large paper ed., ^Q.^5. 
French and Chubbuck, February, 1905, $8. 
Anderson, April, 1905, Arnold copy, $3.25. 



THE OLD ENGLISH DRAMATISTS 

The Old English Dramatists. By James 
Russell Lowell. [Riverside Press vignette.] 
Boston and New York: Houghton^ Mifflin 
and Company. The Riverside Press, Cam- 
bridge, 1892. [November.] 

Post 8vo, pp. 132, boards, portrait, 300 
printed. 

* The last paragraph first appeared in Ehnwood ed. 



[ 131 ] 

The Same. Boston: Houghton, Mifflin & Go., 
1892. 

16mo, pp. 132, cloth. 

Contents 

I. Introductory 
n. Marlowe 
ni. Webster 
IV. Chapman 
V. Beaumont and Fletcher 
VI. Massinger and Ford 

These lectures were originally published in Harper's Maga- 
zine, from June to November, 1892, as follows: 

The Old English Dramatists, June, 1892, v. 85, p. 75. 

Marlowe, July, 1892, v. 85, p. 194. 

Webster, August, 1892, v. 85, p. 411. 

Chapman, September, 1892, v. 85, p. 561. 

Beaumont and Fletcher, October, 1892, v. 85, p. 757. 

Massinger and Ford, November, 1892, v. 85, p. 942. 

Notices and Criticisms. 

Critic, January 7, 1893, v. 19, p. 1. 

Dial, February 16, 1896, v. 14, p. 117. 
Auction Sale Prices. 

French and Chubbuck, February, 1904, large paper ed., 
$3.25. 

Libbie, March, 1904, large paper, $4.50. 

Poole, April, 1905, large paper, $3.25. 

LETTERS OF JAMES RUSSELL LOWELL 

Letters of James Russell Lowell. Edited 
by Charles Eliot Norton. Volume i. [Pub- 
lishers' vignette.] New York: Harper & Bro- 
ther, Publishers, 1894 [1903]. 

Two volumes, 8vo, pp. viii, 418; 464, cloth, 
portrait. 



[132] 

[iii]-v Editorial Note 

In making the following selection from the great mass of Mr. 
Lowell's letters which was in my hands, my attempt was to se- 
cure for it, so far as possible, an autobiographic character. And, 
in the main, this has not been diflScult, for few writers have given 
in their letters a more faithful representation of themselves, and 
of few men is the epistolary record more complete from youth 
to age. . . . 

Charles Eliot Norton. 
Shady Hill, Cambridge, Mass. 
July, 1893. 

Letters of James Russell Lowell. Edited 
by Charles Eliot Norton. In three volumes. 
Volume I. [Riverside Press vignette.] Boston : 
Houghton, Mifflin & Co., 1904. 

12mo, pp. [x], 348; 409; 370, cloth. Por- 
traits and illustrations, 20 in all. 

Appeared in Elmwood, Autograph, and Subscription 
editions, 1904, enlarged from the ed. of 1894. 

"A number of letters, which have come to me since the 
original edition of this selection of Mr. Lowell's Letters was 
published, are now included in their respective places in these 
volumes. They add nothing essential to the image of him pre- 
sented in the former edition, but serve to fill up some minor 
parts of its outline with details which strengthen the likeness." 
— Editor's Note in first volume. 

Notices and Criticisms. 

Charles Eliot Norton, Harper's Magazine, September, 

1893, V. 87, p. 553. 
Athenaeum, October 28, 1893, v. 2, p. 581. 
Literary World, November 4, 1893, v. 24, p. 363. 
Walter Lewin, Academy, December 9, 1893, v. 44, p. 505. 
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Nation, December 28, 1893, 

V. 57, p. 488. 
J. B. Kenyon, Methodist Review, v. 61, p. 269. 
Hamilton Wright Mabie, My Study Fire, second series, 1894. 
Horace E. Scudder, Atlantic Monthly, January, 1894, v. 73, 

p. 124. 



[ 133 ] 

Scribner's Magazine, "Mr. Lowell's Letters," January, 

1894, V. 15, p. 129. 
John White Chadwick, Forum, March, 1894, v. 17, p. 114. 
Royal Cortissoz, Century, March, 1897, v. 31, p. 780. 

Auction Sale Prices. First Edition. 
Arnold, January, 1901, $6. 
White, February, 1901, $5. 
French and Chubbock, February, 1904, $5. 
Libbie, June, 1904, $3.20. 
Knapp, February, 1905, $3. 

LAST POEMS OF JAMES RUSSELL LOWELL 

Last Poems of James Russell Lowell. [River- 
side Press vignette.] Boston and New York: 
Houghton, Mifflin and Company, The River- 
side Press, Cambridge, mdcccxcv. [Septem- 
ber, 1895.] [Edited by Professor Charles Eliot 
Norton.] 

12mo, pp. [x], 47, cloth. 

Contents 
The Oracle of the Goldfishes 
Turner's Old Temeraire 
St. Michael the Weigher 
A Valentine 

An April Birthday at Sea 
Love and Thought 
The Noble Lover 

On Hearing a Sonata of Beethoven's played in the next room 
Verses 
On a Bust of General Grant 

[iii] This little volume contains those of the poems which Mr. 
Lowell wrote in his last years which, I believe, he might have 
wished to preserve. Three of them were pubhshed before 
his death. Of the rest, two appear for the first time. 

September, 1895. C. E. N. 



[134] 

Notices and Criticisms. 
Nation, "Recent Poetry," October 24, 1895, v. 61, p. 296. 
Athenaeum, January 4, 1896, v. 1, p. 12. 
M. A. De WoKe Howe, Atlantic Monthly, February, 1896, 

V. 77, p. 267. 
Dial, February 16, 1896, v. 20 p. 110. 

THE POWER OF SOUND 

The Power of Sound: A Rhymed Lecture 
by James Russell Lowell. Privately printed. 
New York, mdcccxcvi. 

16mo, pp. X, 35, cloth. The lecture occupies 
pp. 1-27, notes, 31-35. Reverse of p. 35, 
stamp of Gillis Press. Number of copy in ink, 
with initials of E. H. Holden, by whom the 
publication was made. "Of this Edition of 
The Power of Sound only seventy-five copies 
have been printed, of which twenty-five are 
on Japanese paper and fifty on hand-made." 

The editor, Professor Charles Eliot Norton, says in his in- 
troductory note: "Mr. Lowell did not esteem this rhymed 
lecture of sufficient worth to include it in his Pubhshed Poems. 
It is too hasty an improvisation to deserve the Imprimatur; but 
though his judgment of it as a whole would be accepted as 
correct, it yet contains passages of such excellence, alike of 
humor and sentiment, and it affords such illustration of his 
convictions in regard to public affairs just before our Civil 
War, that, I believe, there can be no question as to the pro- 
priety of preserving it in print, and I have therefore acceded 
with pleasure to Mr. Holden 's proposal to print an edition of 
it for private circulation. I have been unable to ascertain the 
precise date either of the writing or the delivery of the lecture; 
nor do I know how often, or, except in a single instance [New- 
buryport, Mass.], where it was read in public. An approxi- 
mate date for its original composition, however, and for addi- 
tions subsequently made to it, may be fixed by internal evi- 



[ 135 ] 

dence. There are several references in it to incidents which 
occurred during the summer of 1857, from which it may be 
concluded that it was written in the autumn or early winter of 
that year; while other references in the additions show that 
the latest of them belong to the spring of 1862. The only ex- 
isting copy of the poem is in print on galley sHps, cut up so 
as to make twenty-three pages. The margins of many of these 
pages are full of corrections and additions written in ink or 
pencil. It was put into type and cut up into its present form 
for convenience of reading in public." 

Auction Sale Prices. 
Roos, April, 1897, $26. 

LECTURES ON ENGLISH POETS 

Lectures on English Poets. By James Rus- 
sell Lowell. 

— "Call up him who left haK-told 
The story of Cambuscan bold." 

Cleveland. The Rowfant Club, mdcccxcvii. 

8vo, boards. 

Reprinted from the Boston Daily Advertiser for Janu- 
ary and February, 1855. 

Lowell's Lectures before the Lowell Institute were reported 
in the Boston Daily Advertiser, as follows: 

I. Definitions, Wednesday, January 10, 1855. 
n. PiEBS Ploughman's Vision, Saturday, January 13. 
in. The Metrical Romances, Wednesday, January 17. 
rv. The Ballads, Saturday, January 20. 
V. Chaucer, Wednesday, January 24. 
VI. Spenser, Saturday, January 27. 
vn. Milton, Wednesday, January 31. 
vin. Butler, Saturday, February 3. 
IX. Pope, Wednesday, February 7. 

X. Poetic Diction, Saturday, February 10. 

XI. Wordsworth, Wednesday, February 14. 
XII. [Poetry,] Saturday, February 17. 



Auction Sale Prices. 
Libbie, February, 1900, $12.50. 
Mackay, Apra, 1900, $13.50. 
Arnold, January, 1901, $30. 
French, AprU, 1901, $18. 
Anderson, April, 1903, $22. 

IMPRESSIONS OF SPAIN 

Impressions of Spain. James Russell Lowell. 
Compiled by Joseph B. Gilder. With an In- 
troduction by A. A. Adee. Boston and New 
York: Houghton, Mifflin & Co., The River- 
side Press, 1899. [November.] 

12mo, pp. ix, 107, boards, vellum back. 
Prefatory Note, iii-vii. Introduction, 3-19. 

vii. "The letters which have been chosen for reproduction here 
are those in which our Minister describes the domestic politics 
of Spain; the King's first marriage, at the age of twenty-one, 
to his cousin Mercedes; the attempt upon his life; his bereave- 
ment; and his marriage to the Austrian Archduchess, Maria 
Cristina." 

Contents 
The Domestic Politics of Spain 
The King's First Marriage 
The Death of Queen Mercedes 
Attempted Assassination of the King 
General Grant's Visit to Spain 
The King's Second Marriage 

Most of the letters contained in this volume were originally 
published by the State Department in Executive Documents 
vol. i, 1878. They were partly reprinted in The Critic for Sep- 
tember, 1898, and The Century for November, 1898. 

Notices and Criticisms. 
Academy, February 10, 1900, v. 58, p. 124. 



[ 137 ] 

THE ANTI-SLAVERY PAPERS OF JAMES 
RUSSELL LOWELL 

The Anti-Slavery Papers of James Rus- 
sell Lowell, i. [Riverside Press vignette.] 
Boston and New York: Houghton, Mifflin 
& Co. MDCcccii. [November.] 

Two volumes, 8vo, pp. xiii, 223; 203, boards. 
Edition limited to 500. 

Edited by WiUiam Belmont Parker, who wrote the 
introduction, pp. [v]-ix. 

"Most of the papers included in these two volumes are re- 
printed from the original manuscripts, now in the hands of 
Mrs. Sydney Howard Gay." They appeared originally in the 
"Pennsylvania Freeman" and in the "National Anti-Slavery 
Journal. " 

Contents op vol. i 
A Word in Season 
Texas 

The Prejudice of Color 
The Church and Clergy 
The Church and Clergy Again 
Daniel Webster 

The French Revolution of 1848 
Shall We Ever Be RepubHcan ? 
Presidential Candidates 
An Lnaginary Conversation 
The Sacred Parasol 
The Nominations for the Presidency 
Sympathy with teland 
What will Mr. Webster do? 
The News from Paris 
The Buffalo Convention 
The Irish. RebeUion 
Fanaticism in the Navy 
Exciting Litelligence from South Carolina Turncoats. 



[ 138 ] 

The Attitude of the Religious Press 

"The Conquerors of the New World and their Bondsmen '* 

"The Conquerors of the New World and their Bondsmen" 

Second Notice 
CaUing Things by their Right Names 
Pro-Slavery Logic 
Irish and American Patriots 
The President's Message 
A Washington Monument 

Contents of vol. ii 

The Course of the Whigs 

Our Southern Brethren 

PoHtics and the Pulpit 

Ethnology 

Mr. Calhoun's Report 

The Moral Movement against Slavery 

The Abolitionists and Emancipation 

General Taylor 

Mr. Clay as an AboHtionist — Second Appearance in Fifty 

Years 
Slaveholding Territories 

Anti-Slavery Criticism upon Mr. Clay's Letter 
Public Opinion 
Mobs 

The Roman Republic 
Fourth of July in Charleston 
Moderation 
Criticism and Abuse 
Putting the Cart before the Horse 
Canada 
California 

General Bem's Conversion 
Turkish Tyranny and American 
The South as King Log 
Compromise 
Mr. Webster's Speech 
Another Word on Mr. Webster's Speech 
Pseudo-Conservatism 



E 139 ] 

Notices and Criticisms. 
Scribner's Magazine, "Mr. Lowell in Anti-Slavery Days," 

November, 1891, v. 10, p. 657. 
Nation, "Lowell the Reformer," January 1, 1903, v. 76, p. 

14. 
William Rice, Dial, "Lowell on Human Liberty," January 

1, 1903, V. 34, p. 14. 

Auction Sale Prices. 

French and Chubbuck, February, 1904, $7. 
Anderson, May, 1904, $5.50. 
Anderson, October, 1904, $6. 
Darrah, November, 1904, $3.25. 
McCormack, February, 1905, $3.75. 
Libbie, March, 1905, $3.50. 
Anderson, April, 1905, $6.50. 
Libbie, May, 1905, $5.50. 

EARLY WRITINGS OF JAMES RUSSELL LOWELL 

Early Writings of James Russell Lowell. 
With a Prefatory Note by Dr. Hale, and an 
Introduction by Walter Littlefield. Published 
by John Lane, The Bodley Head, London and 
New York. [September, 1902.] 

Crown 8vo, pp. xxxviii, 248, boards, cloth 
back. Portrait. 

Contents 
Stories, Sketches, Essays 

The First Client 

Married Men 

Getting up 

Disquisition on Foreheads 

Song-writing 
Elizabethan Dramatists, omitting Shakespeare 

George Chapman 

John Webster 



[ 140 ] 

John Ford 
Philip Massinger 
Thomas Middleton 

Notices and Criticisms. 
Nation, November 27, 1902, v. 75, p. 429. 
Academy, "The Beginnings of an Author," January 17, 190S, 
V. 64, p. 65. 

COLLECTED POEMS 

The Poetical Works of James Russell Low- 
ell. Complete in Two Volumes. Boston: 
Ticknor and Fields, 1858 [1857]. 

Blue and Gold edition. 32mo, pp. ix, 315; 
xi, 322; blue cloth, gilt edges. Portrait. 

[v] This volimie, originally inscribed with his name, fourteen 
years ago, is re-dedicated, with still-renewing affection, to 
WilKam Page, in Rome. 

Contents of Vol. i 
Miscellaneous Poems 
Threnodia 
The Sirens 
Jiene 
Serenade 

With a Pressed Flower 
The Beggar 
My Love 
Summer Storm 
Love 

To Perdita, singing 
The Moon 
Remembered Music 
Song: to M. L. 
Allegra 
The Fountain 
Ode 

The Fatherland 
The Forlorn 



[141] 

Midnight 

A Prayer 

The Heritage 

The Rose: A Ballad 

A Legend of Brittany 

Prometheus 

Song 

Bosaline 

The Shepherd of King Admetus 

The Token 

An Incident in a Bailroad Car 

Khoecus 

The Falcon 

Trial 

A Requiem 

A Parable 

A Glance behind the Curtain 

Song^ 

A Chippewa Legend 

Stanzas on Freedom 

Columbus 

An Incident of the Fire at Hambiu*g 

The Sower 

Hunger and Cold 

The Landlord 

To a Pine-Tree 

Si Descendero in Infernum, ades 

To the Past 

To the Future 

Hebe 

The Search 

The Present Crisis 

An Indian Summer Reverie 

The Growth of the Legend 

A Contrast 

Extreme Unction 

The Oak 

Ambrose 

Above and Below 

The Captive " 



[ 142 ] 

The Birch-Tree 

An Interview with Miles Standish 

On the Capture of Certain Fugitive Slaves near Washington 

To the Dandelion 

The Ghost-Seer 

Studies for Two Heads 

On a Portrait of Dante, by Giotto 

On the Death of a Friend's Child 

Eurydice 

She came and went 

The Changeling 

The Pioneer 

Longing 

Ode to France 

Anti-Apis 

A Parable 

Ode on the Introduction of Cochituate Water 

Lines on the Graves of two English Soldiers 

To 

Freedom 
Bibliolatres 
Beaver Brook 
Memorial Verses 
Kossuth 
To Lamartine 
To John G. Palfrey 
To W. L. Garrison 
On the Death of Charles T. Torrey 
Elegy on the Death of Dr. Channing 
To tiie Memory of Hood 

Sonnets 

I. "Through suffering and sorrow" 

II. "What were I, Love" 

in. "I would not have this perfect love " 

IV. "For this true nobleness" 

V. To the spirit of Keats 

VI. "Great Truths are portions of the soul" 

VII. "I ask not for those thoughts" 

vni. To M. W., on her birthday 



[ 143 ] 

IX. "My Love, I have no fear" 
X. "I cannot think that thou " 
XI. "There never yet was flower" 
xn. Sub pondere crescit 
xni. "Beloved, in the noisy city here" 
XIV. On reading Wordsworth's Sonnets in Defence of 

Capital Punishment 

XV. The Same continued 

XVI. The Same continued 

XVII. The Same continued 

xvin. The Same continued 

XIX. The Same concluded 

XX. To M. O. S. 

XXI. "Our love is not a fading, earthly flower" 
xxn. In Absence 
xxm. Wendell Phillips 
XXIV. The Street 

XXV. "I grieve not that ripe knowledge" 
XXVI. To J. R. Giddings 
xxvn. "I thought our love at full" 
L'Envoi 
The Vision of Sir Launfal 

Contents of vol. ii 
A Fable for Critics 
The Biglow Papers 
The Unhappy Lot of Mr. Knott 
An Oriental Apologue 

This was the first complete edition of Lowell's Poetical 
Works. The early poems were grouped as "Miscella- 
neous," the "Memorial Verses" placed together, while 
the sonnets were arranged as in all subsequent editions. 

The second volume was dedicated: "To Charies F. 
Briggs this volume is affectionately inscribed." 

The Same. 

16mo edition from same plates, 1877. 

Auction Sale Prices. 
Foote, November, 1894, $7. 



[144] 

The Poetical Works of James Russell Low- 
ell. Complete Edition. [Publishers' mono- 
gram.] Boston: Fields^ Osgood & Co,, 1869. 
[November,] 

18mo, pp. ix, 437, double columns, cloth. 

[iii] To George William Curtis, this first complete edition of 
my poems is affectionately inscribed. 

Contents 
Miscellaneous Poems 
Memorial Verses 
Sonnets 

The Vision of Sir Launfal 
A Fable for Critics 
The Biglow Papers, First Series 
The Biglow Papers, Second Series 
The Unhappy Lot of Mr. Knott 
An Oriental Apologue 
Under the Willows, and Other Poems 
Poems of the War 
L'Envoi: To the Muse 

The Same. Cabinet Edition. Two volumes. 
Boston: Ticknor & Fields, 1864. [October.] 

16mo, garnet cloth. Same as Blue and Gold 
Edition. 

Poetical Works, including A Fable for Critics. 
Preface by W. B. B. Stevens. London, 1865. 
8vo. 

The Poetical Works of James Russell Low- 
ell. Complete edition. With Illustrations. 
^osioii\ Fields, Osgood & Co., 1870. [Decem- 
ber.] 

16mo, pp. 437, cloth. Portrait. 



[145] 

Contents 

Miscellaneous Poems 

Memorial Verses 

Somiets 

The Vision of Sir Launfal 

A Fable for Critics 

The Biglow Papers, Both Series 

The Unhappy Lot of Mr. Knott 

An Oriental Apologue 

Under the Willows, and Other Poems 

Poems of the War 

L'Envoi: To the Muse 

The Cathedral 

The Same. Diamond Edition. 
18mo. 

The Same. Red-line Edition. 

Small 4to, full gilt; portrait and cuts. 

The Same. Household Edition. 
12mo. 

The Same. New Revised Edition. With numerous 

illustrations. pPublishers' monogram.] Boston: 

James R. Osgood and Company, late Tichnor 

& Fields, and Fields, Osgood & Co., 1877. 

[1876.] 

8vo, pp. xii, 406, cloth. Portrait. 
Contents 
Earlier Poems 
Threnodia 
The Sirens 
Iren^ 
Serenade 

With a Pressed Flower 
The Beggar 
" My Love 



[ 146 ] 

Summer Storm 
Love 

To Perdita, singing 
The Moon 
Remembered Music 

Song "A Lily thou wast when I saw thee first " 
Allegra 
The Fountain 

Ode "In the old days of awe and keen-eyed wonder " 
The Fatherland 
The Forlorn 
Midnight 
A Prayer 
The Heritage 
The Rose: A Ballad 
Song: "Violet! sweet violet!" 
Rosaline 
A Requiem 

A Parable "Worn and footsore was the Prophet" 
Song "O moonlight deep and tender " 
Sonnets 

I. To A. C. L. 

II. "What were I, Love" 

in. "I would not have this perfect love" 

IV. "For this true nobleness" 
V. To the Spirit of Keats 

VI. "Great Truths are portions of the soul" 

VII. "I ask not for those thoughts" 
VIII. To M. W. on her birthday 

IX. "My Love, I have no fear" 
X. "I cannot think that thou" 

XI. "There never yet was flower" 

XII. Sub Pondere Crescit 

XIII. " Beloved, in the noisy city here " 

xrv. On Reading Wordsworth's Sonnets in Defence of 

Capital Punishment 

XV. The same continued 

XVI. The same continued 

XVII. The same continued 

xvin. The same continued 



I] 147] 

XIX. The same concluded 

XX. To M. O. S. 

XXI. "Our love is not a fading, earthly flower' 
xxn. In Absence 
xxni. Wendell Phillips 
xxiv. The Street 

XXV. "I grieve not that ripe knowledge** 
XXVI. To J. R. Giddings 
xxvii. "I thought our love at full" 

L'Envoi 
Miscellaneous Poems 

A Legend of Brittany 

Prometheus 

The Shepherd of King Admetus 

The Token 

An Incident in a Hailroad Car 

Rhcecus 

The Falcon 

Trial 

A Glance behind the Curtain 

A Chippewa Legend 

Stanzas on Freedom 

Columbus 

An Incident of the Fire at Hamburg 

The Sower 

Hunger and Cold 

The Landlord 

To a Pine-Tree 

Si Descendero in Infernum, ades 

To the Past 

To the Future 

Hebe 

The Search 

The Present Crisis 

An Indian-Summer Reverie 

The Growth of the Legend 

A Contrast 

Extreme Unction 

The Oak 

Ambrose 

Above and Below 



[ 148 ] 

The Captive 

The Birch-Tree 

An Interview with Miles Standish 

On the Capture of Fugitive Slaves near Washington 

To the Dandelion 

The Ghost-Seer 

Studies for Two Heads 

On a Portrait of Dante by Giotto 

On the Death of a Friend's Child 

Eurydice 

She came and went 

The Changeling 

The Pioneer 

Longing 

Ode to France 

Anti-Apis 

A Parable. "Said Christ our Lord, * I wiU go and see' " 

Ode written for the Celebration of the Introduction of 

the Cochituate Water into the City of Boston. 
Lines suggested by the Graves of two English Soldiers on 

Concord Battle-Ground 

To , "We, too, have autumns, when our leaves" 

Freedom 
BibKolatres 
Beaver Brook 
Memorial Verses 
The Vision of Sir Launfal 
A Fable for Critics 
The Biglow Papers. First Series 
The Biglow Papers. Second Series 
The Unhappy Lot of Mr. Knott 
An Oriental Apologue 
Under the Willows, and Other Poems 
Poems of the War 
The Cathedral 

In this edition the poems were carefully revised, many 
excisions made, and the separation made into "Earlier" 
and "Miscellaneous." 



[ 149 ] 

The Same. Illustrated Library Edition, October, 
1876, as above. 

The Same. Household Edition, August, 1876. 
l^mo. 

The Same. Critical Preface by William Michael 
Rossetti. London, Moxon's Popular Poets, 
1880. 

12mo and 8vo, pp. xvi, 623. 

The Same. Revised edition, with illustrations. 
London: Routledge, November, 1881. 
8vo, pp. xii, 422. 

The Same. London: Routledge's Excelsior Se- 
ries, 1884. 
Pp. 512. 

The Same. New edition. London: Macmillan, 
July, 1880. 
12mo. 

The Same. London: Ward and Lock, October, 
1880. 
Post 8vo. 

The Same. Illustrated Household Edition. Bos- 
ton: Houghton, Mifflin & Co,, June, 1885. 

Poems. Library Edition, new size. Boston: 
Houghton, Mifflin & Co,, 1886. 

The Same. Family Edition. Boston: Houghton, 
Mifflin & Co,, July, 1887. 



U 150 ] 

Household Edition. Complete Poetical Works. 
Boston: Houghton, Mifflin & Co,, 1895. 

Crown 8vo, pp. xvii, 515. Portrait; illus- 
trations. Red cloth, gilt top. 

Contents 

[Biographical Sketch, by Horace E. Scudder] 

EarUer Poems 

Sonnets 

Miscellaneous Poems 

Memorial Verses 

The Vision of Sir Launf al 

A Fable for Critics 

Letter from Boston 

The Biglow Papers, First and Second Series 

The Unhappy Lot of Mr. Knott 

An Oriental Apologue 

Fragments of an Unfinished Poem 

Under the Willows, and Other Poems 

Poems of the War 

The Cathedral 

Three Memorial Poems 

Heartsease and Rue 

Last Poems 

Index of First Lines 

Index of Titles 

The Complete Poetical Works of James 
Russell Lowell. Cambridge Edition. [Illus- 
tration of Elmwood, Cambridge.] Boston and 
New York: Houghton, Mifflin & Co, The 
Riverside Press, Cambridge. [February, 1897; 
copyright, 1896.] 

Large crown 8vo, pp. xvii, 492, gilt top, 
brown cloth. Portrait ; engraved title with 
vignette of Lowell's home ; notes and intro- 
ductions by Horace E. Scudder. 



E 151 ] 

Contents 

Publishers' Note 

Biographical Sketch, Horace E. Scudder 
Earher Poems 
Sonnets 

Miscellaneous Poems 
Memorial Verses 
The Vision of Sir Launfal 
Letter from Boston, December, 1846 
A Fable for Critics 
The Unhappy Lot of Mr. Knott 
Fragments of an Unfinished Poem 
An Oriental Apologue 
The Biglow Papers, First Series 
The Biglow Papers, Second Series 
Under the Willows, and Other Poems 
Poems of the War 
L'Envoi: To the Muse 
The Cathedral 
Three Memorial Poems 
Heartsease and Rue 
Last Poems 
Appendix 
I. Introduction to the Second Series of Biglow Papers 
II. Glossary to the Biglow Papers 

III. Lidex to the Biglow Papers 

IV. Notes and Illustrations 

V. A Chronological List of Mr. Lowell's Poems 
Index of First Series 

Index to Titles 

Library Edition. Complete Poetical Works. 
Same as Household Edition. 

8vo, gilt top. Portrait ; 16 photogravures. 

Cabinet Edition. Complete Poetical Works, 
1899. 



COLLECTED WORKS 

Riverside Edition. The Writings of James 
Russell Lowell. In Ten Volumes. [Riverside 
Press Vignette.] Boston and New York, 
Houghton^ Mifflin and Company, The River- 
side Press, Cambridge, mdcccxc. 
16mo, brown cloth; portraits. 

Vol. I. Literary Essays, i 

Prefatory Note to the Essays 
[v] The greater part of the hterary and critical essays here 
collected was originally written as lectures for an audience 
consisting not only of my own classes but also of such other 
members of the university as might choose to attend them. 
This will account for, if it do not excuse, a more rhetorical 
tone in them here and there than I should have allowed myseK 
had I been writing for the eye and not the ear. They were 
meant to be suggestive of certain broader principles of criticism 
based on the comparative study of Hterature in its large mean- 
ing, rather than methodically pedagogic, to stimulate rather 
than to supply the place of individual study. ... 
[vi] Let me add that in preparing these papers for the press 
I omitted much illustrative and subsidiary matter, and this I 
regret when it is too late. Five or six lectures, for instance, 
were condensed into the essay on Rousseau. The dates attached 
were those of publication, but the bulk of the material was 
written many years earlier, some of it so long ago as 1854. . . . 
25th April, 1890. J. R. L. 

Contents 

A Moosehead Journal 
Cambridge Thirty Years Ago 
Leaves from My Journal in Italy and Elsewhere 
I. At Sea 
II. In the Mediterranean 



[ 153 ] 

III. Italy 

IV. A Few Bits of Roman Mosaic 
Keats 

Library of Old Authors 
Emerson the Lecturer 
Thoreau 

Vol. II. LiTERABY Essays, ii 

Contents 
New England Two Centuries Ago 
Carlyle 

Swinburne's Tragedies 

The Life and Letters of James Gates Percival 
Lessing 

Rousseau and the SentimentaKsts 
A Great Public Character 
Witchcraft 

Vol. m. Literary Essays, hi 
Contents 

Shakespeare Once More 

Dryden 

My Garden Acquaintance 

On a Certain Condescension in Foreigners 

A Good Word for Winter 

Chaucer 

Vol. rv. Literary Essays, iv 

Contents 
Pope 
Milton 
Dante 
Spenser 
Wordsworth 

Vol. V. Political Essays 

Contents 
The American Tract Society 
The Election in November 
E Pluribus Unum 
The Pickens-and-Stealin*s Rebellion 



[ 154 ] 

General McClellan's Report 

The RebelKon: Its Causes and Consequences 

McClellan or Lincoln 

Abraham Lincoln 

Reconstruction 

Scotch the Snake, or KiU it ? 

The President on the Stump 

The Seward-Johnson Reaction 

Vol. VI. Literary and Political Addresses 
Contents 
Democracy 
Garfield 
Stanley 
Fielding 
Coleridge 

Books and Libraries 
Wordsworth 
Don Quixote 
Harvard Anniversary 
Tariff Reform 

Place of the Independent in Politics 
"Our Literature " 
General Index 

Vol. VII. Poems, i 

[iii] Prefatory Note to the Poems 

There are a great many pieces in these volumes, especially in 
the first of them, which I would gladly suppress or put into the 
Coventry of smaller print in an appendix. But " ilka mon maun 
dree his weird," and the avenging litera scripta manet is that of 
an overhasty author. Owing to the unjust distinction made by 
the law between literary and other property, most of what I pub- 
lished prematurely has lost the protection of copyright, and is 
reprinted by others against my will. I cannot shake off the bur- 
den of my early indiscretions if I would. The best way, perhaps, 
is to accept with silent contrition the consequences of one's own 
mistakes, and I have, after much hesitation, consented to the 
reprinting of the old editions without excision. 

I must confess, however, that I have attained this pitch of self- 
sacrifice only by compulsion, and should have greatly preferred 
to increase the value of this collection by lessening its bulk. The 



[ 155 ] 

judicious reader will, I fear, distinguish only too easily what I 
should wish, in parliamentary phrase, "to be taken as read." . . . 

Contents 
Earlier Poems 
Sonnets 

Miscellaneous Poems 
Memorial Verses 
The Vision of Sir Launfal 
Letter from Boston, December, 1846 

Vol. VIII. Poems, n 

Contents 
The Biglow Papers, First Series 
The Biglow Papers, Second Series 

Vol. IX. Poems, in 

Contents 
A Fable for Critics 
The Unhappy Lot of Mr. Knott 
Fragments of an Unpublished Poem 
An Oriental Apologue 
Under the Willows, and Other Poems 

Vol. X. Poems, iv 

Contents 

Poems of the War 

L'Envoi 

The Cathedral 

Three Memorial Poems 

Heartsease and Rue 

Index of First Lines 

General Index of Titles 

Edition of vol. iv, 1897, adds The Last Poems, increasing 
pages to 298. 

In 1892 a prose volume was added to this edition, and num- 
bered. 

Vol. XL Latest Literart Essays and Addresses. 
Editorial Note by Charles Eliot Norton. [November, 1892.] 



[156] 

Contents 

Latest liiterary Essays and Addresses 
Gray 

Some Letters of Walter Savage Landor 
Walton 

Milton's "Areopagitica " 
Shakespeare's "Richard III " 
The Study of Modern Languages 
The Progress of the World 
The Old English Dramatists 
I. Introductory 
II. Marlowe 

III. Webster 

IV. Chapman 

V. Beaumont and Fletcher 
VI. Massinger and Ford 
Index 

A Large Paper Edition also was published in 1890. 

Standard Library Edition. Writings. Ten 
volumes, September, 1891. Illustrated with 
83 steel engravings and photogravures. 

This edition is printed from the plates of the River- 
side Edition and the contents of the different volumes 
are unchanged. The set was increased by the addition 
of volume xi, in 1892; and when the two volumes 
of Mr. Scudder's Biography of Lowell were issued, in 
1902, they also were included in the Standard Library 
Edition. 

Popular Edition. Boston, Houghton, Mifflin & 
Co,, 1892. 
12mo. 

Vol. I. Fireside Travels 

Vol. II. Among My Books, First Series 

Vol. III. Among My Books, Second Series 



[157] 

Vol. IV. My Study Windows 
Vol. V. Political Essays 
Vol. VI. Poetical Works 

Elmwood Edition. The Complete Writings of 
James Russell Lowell. In Sixteen Volumes. 
Boston: Houghton, Mifflin and Company, The 
Riverside Press, Cambridge, 1904. 

12mo, green cloth, gilt top. Portraits, illus- 
trations, facsimiles. [86 in all.] 

"This edition varies from the Riverside edition of 
1890 in the retention of the original titles of the volumes 
of prose essays." — Publishers' Note, vol. i. 

Vol. I. Fireside Travels 

[iii] Publishers' Note 
Contents 

Introduction [by Bliss Perry] 
Cambridge Thirty Years Ago 
A Moosehead Journal 

Leaves from My Journal in Italy and Elsewhere 
I. At Sea 
II. In the Mediterranean 

III. Italy 

IV. A Few Bits of Roman Mosaic 
My Garden Acquaintance 

On a Certain Condescension in Foreigners 
A Good Word for Winter 

Vol. II. My Study Windows 
Contents 
A Great Public Character 
Carlyle 

The Life and Letters of James Gates Percival 
Thoreau 

Swinburne's Tragedies 
Chaucer 

Library of Old Authors 
Emerson the Lecturer 
Pope 



[158] 

Vol. III. Among My Books. First and Second Series, i 

Contents 
Dryden 
Witchcraft 
Shakespeare Once More 

Vol. IV. Among My Books. First and Second Series, ii 

Contents 

New England Two Centuries Ago 

Lessing 

Rousseau and the Sentimentalists 

Spenser 

Vol. V. Among My Books. First and Second Series, in 

Contents 
Dante 

Wordsworth 
Milton 
Keats 

Vol. VI. Political Essays 

Contents 
The American Tract Society 
The Election in November 
E Pluribus Unum 

The Pickens-and-Stealin's Rebellion 
Greneral McClellan*s Report 
The Rebellion; Its Causes and Consequences 
McClellan or Lincoln ? 
Abraham Lincoln 
Reconstruction 
Scotch the Snake, or Kill it ? 
The President on the Stump 
The Seward-Johnson Reaction 

Vol. VII. Literary and Political Addresses 

Contents 
Democracy 
Garfield 
Stanley 



|i 159 ] 

Fielding 

Coleridge 

Books and Libraries 

Wordsworth 

Don Quixote 

Harvard Anniversary 

Tariff Reform 

The Place of the Independent in Politics 

"Our Literature " 

Shakespeare's "Richard III " 

The Study of Modern Languages 

Vol. VIII. Latest Literaby Essays. The Old Eng- 
lish Dramatists 
[iii] Editorial Note by Charles Eliot Norton 

Contents 
Gray 

Some Letters of Walter Savage Landor 
Walton 

Milton's "Areopagitica " 
The Progress of the World 
The Old EngUsh Dramatists 
I. Introductory 
II. Marlowe 

III. Webster 

IV. Chapman 

V. Beaumont and Fletcher 
VI. Massinger and Ford 
General Index [to Prose Works] 

Vol. IX. The Poetical Works of James Russell 
Lowell, I 

[v] Prefatory Note to the Poems. [Same as in the Riverside 

Edition.] 
Contents 

Earlier Poems 

Sonnets 

Miscellaneous Poems 

Memorial Verses 

The Vision of Sir Launfal 

Letter from Boston, December, 1846 



[160] 

Vol. X. Poetical Works, n 
The Biglow Papers, First Series. 

Vol. XI. Poetical Works, hi 

The Biglow Papers, Second Series. 

Vol. XII. Poetical Works, iv 

Contents 
A Fable for Critics 
The Unhappy Lot of Mr. Knott 
Fragments of an Unfinished Poem 
An Oriental Apologue 
Under the Willows, and Other Poems 

Vol. Xni. Poetical Works, v 

Contents 
Poems of the War 
The Cathedral 
Three Memorial Poems 
Heartsease and Rue 
Last Poems 
Index of First Lines 
General Index of Titles 

Vol. XIV. Letters of James Russell Lowell. Edited 
by Charles Eliot Norton, i. 

[iii] Note of the Editor. " A number of letters which have come 
to me since the original edition of this selection of Mr. Low- 
ell's Letters was pubhshed, are now included in their respect- 
ive places in these volumes." 

Vol. XV. Letters, ii 

Vol. XVI. Letters, hi 

Autograph Edition. The Complete Writings 

of James Russell Lowell. In Sixteen Volumes. 

Boston: Houghton, Mifflin and Company, 1904. 
Large Paper Edition, printed from the plates 

of the Elmwood Edition. Limited to 1000 

numbered copies. 



SELECTIONS AND COMPILATIONS ^ 

My Garden Acquaintance, etc. Boston: 

Houghton, Mifflin and Company, 1871. 

32mo, pp. 95, cloth. Illustrated. 

Modem Classics, no. 31. 

Contents 

My Garden Acquaintance 
A Good Word for Winter 
A Moosehead Journal 
At Sea 

Lowell Birthday Book. Boston: Houghton, 
Mifflin & Co., February, 1883. 

18mo, pp. 402, cloth. Portrait and illustra- 
tions. 

The Same. London: Chatto, 1883. 32mo. 

Lowell Calendar for 1886. Boston: Hough- 
ton, Mifflin & Co,, May, 1885. 

Lowell Calendar for 1887. Boston: Hough- 
ton, Mifflin & Co,, August, 1886. 

Lowell Calendar for 1889. Boston: Hough- 
ton, Mifflin & Co,, August, 1887. 

Lowell Calendar for 1890. Boston: Hough- 
ton, Mifflin & Co,, September, 1889. 

* See also the list of separate works, where several volumes of selections, 
taking their titles from the initial poems, are listed. 



[ 162 ] 

Lowell Birthday Book. London: Warne, 1898. 
16mo. 

Under the Old Elm, and Other Poems. With 

Notes and a Biographical Sketch. Boston: 

Houghton, Mifflin & Co., 1885. 

18mo, pp. 96, cloth. 

Riverside Literature Series, no. 15. 

Contents 
Biographical Sketch 
Under the Old Ehn 
Ode read at Concord 
Under the Willows 
Cochituate Ode 
The Courtin' 
To H. W. Longfellow 
Agassiz 
To Holmes 
ToWhittier 

An Incident in a Railroad Car 
The Fountain 
An Ember Picture 
Phoebe 

To the DandeUon 
She came and went 
Yussouf 
The Maple 

Appendix. In the Laboratory with Agassiz, by a former 
Pupil. 

The English Poets, Lessing, Rousseau. 
Essays by James Russell Lowell, with "An 
Apology for a Preface." London: Walter Scott, 
1888. 

16mo, pp. X, 337, cloth. Preface to this 
edition, by Lowell, pp. vii-x. 

The Camelot Series. Edited by Ernest Rhys. 



[i 163] 



Contents 
Spenser 

Shakespeare Once More 
MUton 
Wordsworth 
Keats 



Rousseau and the Sentimentalists 

American Ideas for English Readers. By 
James Russell Lowell. With Introduction by- 
Henry Stone. Published by J, G, Cupples Co., 
Boston. [1892.] 

Narrow 16mo, pp. xv, 94, cloth. 
An unauthorized reprint of newspaper reports of lec- 
tures and addresses delivered in England. 

Contents 

Before the Edinburgh Philosophical Institution 

Before the London Chamber of Commerce 

At the University of Cambridge 

On Robert Browning 

At the Unveiling of the Gray Memorial 

Before the Town Council of the City of Worcester 

On International Arbitration 

At a Royal Academy Dinner 

At the Stratford Memorial Fountain Presentation 

At the Dinner to American Authors 

Before the Liverpool Philomathic Society 

Odes, Lyrics, and Sonnets. Boston: Hough- 
ton, Mifflin & Co., 1892. [November, 1891.] 
16mo, 193 pp., cloth. 

Contents 
Odes 

Ode recited at the Harvard Commemoration, July 21, 
1865 



Under the Old Elm 



[ 164] 

Lyrics 

Endymion 

The Origin of Didactic Poetry 

An Incident in a Railroad Car 

At the Burns Centennial 

Hebe 

Phoebe 

To the Dandelion 

The Nightingale in the Study 

Auf Wiedersehen! 

Palinode 

Beaver Brook 

The First Snow-Fall 

To a Pine-Tree 

Al Fresco 

An Invitation 

Without and Within 

Aladdin 

Agro-Dolce 

Invita Minerva 

The Flying Dutchman 

Monna Lisa 

On Burning Some Old Letters 

The Courtin' 

To W. L. Garrison 

Villa Franca 

On Board the '76 
Sonnets 

My Portrait Gallery 

Prison of Cervantes 

The Dancing Bear 

To the Spirit of Keats 

Wendell Phillips 

Bankside 

To Fanny Alexander 

" There never yet was flower fair in vain " 

" Our love is not a fading, earthly flower " 



[ 165 ] 

Lowell Leaflets: Poems and Prose Passages. 
Compiled by Josephine E. Hodgdon. Boston: 
Houghton, Mifflin & Co., 1896. 
Crown 8vo, pp. 102, cloth. 
Riverside Literature Series, no. 99, extra. 

Contents 

Biographical Sketch of Lowell 

Birthday Verses 

The Foxintain of Youth 

The Heritage 

Violet! Sweet Violet! 

To the Dandelion 

The Nest: May 

PaKnode: December 
An Interview with Miles Standish 
A Modern Instance of a Wise Saw 
The Birch-Tree 
Science and Poetry 

To Holmes on his Seventy-fifth Birthday 
Aladdin 
Yussouf 
The Oak 

What a Cunning Silversmith is Frost! 
Ode written for the Celebration of the Introduction of the 

Cochituate Water into the City of Boston 
The Shepherd of King Admetus 
Midnight 

The Finding of the Lyre 
The Optimist 
The Falcon 

In a Copy of Omar Khayyam 
Concerning Books 
The Miner 

An Incident in a Railroad Car 
The Singing Leaves 
Stanzas on Freedom 
The Frost-Path 
The Moral in Don Quixote 



E 166 ] 

Summer Storm 

She came and went 

The Eomitain 

Al Fresco 

To a Pine-Tree 

The Changeling 

The Maple 

The Beggar 

Allegra 

A Contrast 

The Vision of Sir Launfal 

Kossuth 

The Pioneer 

Sea-Weed 

A Perfect Little Picture 

On Planting a Tree at Inveraray 

To H. W. L. on his Birthday, 27th February, 1867 

To Whittier on his Seventy-fifth Birthday 

Under the October Maples 

In the Twilight 

Abraham Lincoln 

For an Autograph 

The First Snow-Fall 

Longing 

A Wider and Wiser Humanity ^ 

The Fatherland 

Auf Wiedersehen, Summer 

Palinode, Autunm 

Bon Voyage! 

A Christmas Carol 

New Year's Eve, 1850 

A New Year's Greeting 

How I consulted the Oracle of the Goldfishes 

On a Bust of General Grant 

Selected Passages 

Nature, by Ralph Waldo Emerson. My Garden 
Acquaintance. By James Russell Lowell. 
Prescribed by the Regents of the University of 



[ 167 ] 

the State of New York for the Course in Amer- 
ican ^ Selections, Introduction, Biographical 
Sketch of Emerson, and Notes to Both Essays. 
Boston: Houghton^ Mifflin & Co,, 1902. 

18mo, pp. 78, cloth. 

Riverside Literature Series, no. 149, extra (T). 

Contents 
Introduction 
Emerson's Career 

Nature. By Ralph Waldo Emerson 
My Garden Acquaintance. By James Russell Lowell 
Notes 

The Chief American Poets : Selected Poems by- 
Bryant, Poe, Emerson, Longfellow, Whittier, 
Holmes, Lowell, Whitman, and Lanier. Edited, 
with notes, reference lists, and biographical 
sketches, by Curtis Hidden Page. Boston: 
Houghton, Mifflin and Company, 1905. 
Svo, xii, 713 pp. Lowell, pp. 410-531. 

Contents [Selections from Lowell] 

"For this true nobleness I seek in vain " 

My Love 

"My Love, I have no fear that thou shouldst die" 

"I ask not for those thoughts, that sudden leap" 

"Great Truths are portions of the soul of man" 

To the Spirit of Keats 

"Our Love is not a fading, earthly flower" 

"Beloved, in the noisy city here" 

Song: "O Moonlight deep and tender" 

The Shepherd of King Admetus 

An Incident in a Railroad Car 

Stanzas on Freedom 

Wendell Phillips 

Rhoecus 

To the Dandehon 



[168] 

Columbus 
The Present Crisis 
A Contrast 

An Indian-Summer Reverie 
Hebe 

The ChangeHng 
She came and went 

"I thought our love at full, but I did err" 
The Biglow Papers^ First Series 

A Letter from Mr. Ezekiel Biglow of Jaalam to the 
Hon. Joseph T. Buckingham 

What Mr. Robinson thinks 

The Pious Editor's Creed 

A Second Letter from B. Sawin, Esq. 
From ** A Fable for Critics" 
The Vision of Sir Launf al 
Beaver Brook 

BibKolatres , 

The First Snow-Fall 
The Singing Leaves 
Without and Within 
Auf Wiedersehen 
Pahnode 
The Wind-Harp 
After the Burial 
L'Envoi; To the Muse 
Masaccio 

The Origin of Didactic Poetry 
The Dead House 
At the Burns Centennial 
The Washers of the Shroud 
The Biglow PaperSy Second Series 

The Courtin' 

Mason and Slidell 

Jonathan and John 

Sunthin' in the Pastoral Line 

Latest Views of Mr. Biglow 

Mr. Hosea Biglow to the Editor of the Atlantic Monthly 
On Board the '76 
Ode recited at the Harvard Commemoration 



[ 169 ] 

The Miner 
To H. W. L. 

The Nightingale in the Study 
An Ember Picture 
In the Twilight 
For an Autograph 
The Foot-Path 
Aladdin 

To Charles EUot Norton 
Agassiz 

Sonnet — Scottish Border 
Three Memorial Poems 

Ode read at the One Hundredth Anniversary of the 
Fight at Concord Bridge 

Under the Old Elm 

An Ode for the Fourth of July 
Death of Queen Mercedes 
Phoebe 

To Whittier, on his Seventy-fifth Birthday 
To Holmes, on his Seventy-fifth Birthday 
International Copyright 
Sixty-eighth Birthday 

Inscription proposed for a Soldiers' and Sailors' Monument 
Endymion 
Auspex 

The Pregnant Comment 
Telepathy 
The Secret 
Monna Lisa 
The Nobler Lover 

"Franciscus de Venilamio sic cogitavit" 
In a copy of Omar Khayydm 
Turner's Old Temeraire 
On a Bust of General Grant 



WORKS EDITED BY LOWELL 

In the case of the first six works listed under this 
heading the biographical introduction was contributed 
or edited by Lowell and the text was printed under his 
care. 

The Poetical Works of John Keats. With 
a Life. Boston: Little, Brown and Company. 
New York: Evans and Dickerson. Philadelphia : 
LippincoU, Grambo & Co, m.dccc.liv. 
The Life of Keats, pp. vii-xxxvi. 

The Poetical Works of John Dryden. Bos- 
ton: Little, Brown and Company, New York: 
Evans and Dickerson, Philadelphia: Lippin- 
cott, Grambo and Co, m.dccc.liv. 
In five volumes. 

The Poetical Works of William Words- 
worth, D. C. L., Poet Laureate, etc., etc. 
Boston: Little, Brown and Company. New 
York: Evans and Dickerson, Philadelphia: 
Lippincott, Grambo, and Co, m.dccc.liv. 

In six volumes. Sketch of Wordsworth's Life, vol. i, 
pp. viii-xl. 

The Poetical Works of Percy Bysshe 
Shelley. Edited by Mrs. Shelley. With a 
Memoir. Boston: Little, Brown and Company, 
New York: James S, Dickerson, Philadelphia: 
Lippincott, Grambo and Co, m.dccc.lv. 



[171] 

Lui non trov' io, ma suoi santi vestigi 

Tutti rivolti alia superna strada 

Veggio, lunge da' laghi averni e stigi. — Petrarca. 

In three volumes. 

The Poetical Works of Dr. John Donne. 
With a Memoir. Boston: Little, Brown and 
Company. Shepard, Clark and Co. New York: 
James S. Dicherson. Philadelphia: J. B. Lip- 
pincott and Co. m.dccc.lv. 

Some account of the Life of Dr. John Donne, pp. 
xi-xiv. 

The Poetical Works of Andrew Marvell. 
With a Memoir of the Author. Boston: Little, 
Brown and Company. Shepherd, Clark and 
Brown. Cincinnati : Moore, Wilstach, Keys and 

Co. M.DCCC.LVII. 
Notice of the Author, pp. ix-liii. 

Il Pesceballo. Opera Seria: In un Atto, Mu- 
sica del Maestro Rossibelli-Donimosarti. The 
words by F. J. Child, the English text by 
Lowell. Cambridge : Privately printed, 1862. 
16mo, pp. 31, paper. 

Presented in Boston, 1861, 1862. In 1862 at Horti- 
cultural Hall, May 10, 12,14, for the benefit of the people 
of East Tennessee. 

Auction Sale Prices. 

French and Chubbuck, February, 1904, $25. 
Anderson, January, 1904, $24. 
Anderson, January, 1905, $79. 
Knapp, February, 1905, $18. 

The Same. Chicago: Caxton Club, 1899. 
8vo, paper. 



li 172 ] 

The Harvard Book. A Series of Historical, 
Biographical, and Descriptive Sketches. By- 
Various Authors. Illustrated. By F. O. Vaille 
and H. A. Clark. Cambridge, 1875. 
In two volumes. 
"Class Day," by LoweU, vol. ii, pp. 157-172. 

True Manliness. Thomas Hughes. Edited by 
E. E. Brown. Introduction by James Russell 
Lowell. Boston: D. Lothrop & Co., 1880. 
Spare Minute Series. 

Birmingham Health Lectures. Second Series. 
Preface by James Russell Lowell. Birmingham: 
Hudson & Son, 1883. 

The Progress of the World. Introduction 
by James Russell Lowell. Boston: Gately & 
O'Gorman, 1886. 
Reprinted in Latest Literary Essays, 1891. 

The Complete Angler, or the Contemplative 
Man's Recreation, of Isaak Walton and Charles 
Cotton, with an Introduction by James Russell 
Lowell. [Edited by John Bartlett.] Boston: 
Little, Brown & Co,, 1889. 
In two volumes. 

Lowell's Introduction, pp. xv-lxv. Reprinted in 
Latest Literary Essays, 1891. 

John Milton. Areopagitica. A Speech for the 
Liberty of Unlicensed Printing, to the Parlia- 
ment of England. With an Introduction by 



[ 173 ] 

James Russell Lowell. New York: The 
Grolier Club, 1890. 

16mo, pp. Ivii, 189. Portrait. Edition of 
325 copies. 

Poems. John Donne. From the Text of the 
Edition of 1633, revised by James Russell 
Lowell. With the various readings of the other 
editions of the Seventeenth Century, and with a 
preface, an introduction, and notes by Charles 
Eliot Norton. New York: The Grolier Club, 
1895. 

In two volumes. 

" After the publication of the Boston edition [1855], Mr. 
Lowell scored the margins of the volume with emendations, 
mainly of the punctuation, amounting to many hundreds in 
number. It seemed a pity that this work should be lost, and 
the Grolier Club undertook the present edition for the sake of 
preserving it. In order to give this issue still further value, a 
comparison has been made of the texts of all of the editions of 
the seventeenth century, from the first in 1633 to the last in 
1669, and the various readings noted. This was done by 
Mrs. Burnett, the daughter of Mr. Lowell, and by myself, with 
the result which is shown in the footnotes." 



ADDRESSES AND SPEECHES 

Tribute to John P. Kennedy, at the meeting of the 
Massachusetts Historical Society held September, 1870. 
Proceedings, v. 11, p. 365. 

Speech on Washington Anniversary in Cambridge. 
Proceedings, July 3, 1875, in Celebration of the Cen- 
tennial Anniversary of Washington's taking Command 
of the Continental Army at Cambridge Common. 
Cambridge, 1875, 8vo, cloth. 

Tribute to Edmund Quincy, at the meeting of the Massa- 
chusetts Historical Society held June, 1877. 
Proceedings, v. 17, p. 286. 

Speech in Memorial Hall on the Old South Meeting- 
House. 

Report of a Meeting of the Inhabitants of Cambridge 
in Memorial Hall, Harvard College, January 18, 1877. 
Boston, Press of George H. Ellis, 1877. 8vo. 

Speech at a Dinner given him by the directors of the Edin- 
burgh Philosophical Institution, Balmoral Hotel, Edin- 
burgh, November 6, 1880. 

American Ideas for EngUsh Readers, 1892. 

Speech at Savage Club Dejeuner to American Actors. 
Reported in The Era, London, August 2, 1880. 

Address on Garfield's Death. 

Death of President Garfield. Meeting of Americans 
in London, at Exeter Hall, 24 September, 1881. Address 
by Lowell. London, Benjamin Franklin Stevens^ Chis- 



[ 175 ] 

wick Press, 1881. Square 12mo, linen. 100 copies 
printed. Introduction by Lowell. 

Democracy, and Other Addresses, 1886. Contains both 
introduction and address. 

Speech at Dinner, London Chamber of Commerce, 
January 29, 1883. 

American Ideas for English Readers, 1892. 

Address on unveiling the Bust of Fielding, delivered 
at Shire Hall, Taunton, Somersetshire, September 4, 
1883. 
Democracy, and Other Addresses, 1886. 

Speech at the meeting in the Chapter House of West- 
minster Abbey in commemoration of Dean Stanley, 
December 13, 1881. 

Democracy, and Other Addresses, 1886. 

Address read before the Edinburgh Philosophical 
Institution, 1883, on Shakespeare's "Richard III." 
Atlantic Monthly, December, 1891, v. 68, p. 816. 
Latest Literary Essays and Addresses, 1891. 

Address before the Union League Club of Chicago, 
December, 1886, on Shakespeare's " Richard III." 

Address at the University of Cambridge on the 
OPENING OF Arch^ological Buildings, May 6, 1884. 
American Ideas for English Readers, 1892. 

Speech at Dulwich College. 
Reported in London Times. 

Letter on a Major in British Army. 

Proceedings of the Massachusetts Historical Society. 
Second Series, vol. 1, p. 229. Boston, 1884. 8vo. 



[ 176 ] 

Despatch to State Department. 

Proceedings of the Massachusetts Historical Society. 
Second Series, vol. 11, p. 208. 

Address on Browning at the twenty-fourth meeting of the 
London Browning Society, April 25, 1884. 

Browning Society Papers, Part v, p. 112, 1884. 
American Ideas for English Readers, 1892. 

Address as President of the Wordsworth Society, 
May 10, 1884. 

Report of the Fifth Annual Meeting. Transactions 
of the Wordsworth Society. No. vi. Edinburgh, Con- 
stable, 1884. 

Wordsworthiana : a Selection from Papers read to the 
W^ordsworth Society. Edited by WilHam Knight. Lon- 
don, Macmillan, 1889. 

Democracy, and Other Addresses, 1888. 

Birmingham and Midland Institute. On Democracy : 
an address deUvered in the Town Hall, Birmingham, on 
the 6th of October, 1884. By his Excellency, the Hon. 
James Russell Lowell, D.C.L., LL.D., American Min- 
ister in London, President. Birmingham: Printed by 
Cond Bros., Paternoster Row, Moor Street, 1884. This 
first edition differs from the following. 

Pall Mall Gazette, October 10, 1884, pp. 18-15. 

London edition, 1884, 8vo. Cambridge edition, 1902, 
12mo, boards. 

Democracy, and Other Addresses, 1886. 

Address on unveiling the bust of Coleridge, in West- 
minster Abbey, May 7, 1885. 

Democracy, and Other Addresses, 1886. 

Address before the Town Council of the City of 
Worcester, in reply to an address presented to him by 
the Mayor on behalf of the citizens, June 2, 1885. 
American Ideas for English Readers, 1892. 



[ 177 ] 

Address on International Arbitration to a Deputa- 
tion FROM the Workmen's Peace Association, which 
waited on Mr. Lowell at the official residence in Albe- 
marle Street, on the evening of June 6, 1884. 
American Ideas for English Readers, 1892. 

Address delivered on the Occasion of the Unveil- 
ing OF THE Bust of the Poet Gray, in the hall of 
Pembroke College, Cambridge, May 26, 1885. 
American Ideas for English Readers, 1892. 

Speech on Concord in Literature. 

Celebration of the 250th Anniversary of the Incorpora- 
tion of Concord, September 12, 1885. Concord, 1885, 
8vo. 

Address on Books and Libraries. 

Proceedings at the Dedication of the New Library 
Building, Chelsea, Mass., December 22, 1885. [With 
the Address by James Russell Lowell on Books and 
Libraries.] Cambridge, John Wilson and Son, Univer- 
sity Press, 1886, 8vo, paper. 

Boston Daily Advertiser, December 23, 1885. 

Democracy, and Other Addresses, 1886. 

Notes on Don Quixote, read at the Workingmen's Col- 
lege, Great Ormond Street, London. (1885 ?) 
Democracy, and Other Addresses, 1886. 

Addresses at the Inauguration of Bryn Mawr Col- 
lege, 1885. Philadelphia, 1886, 8vo. Address by Lowell. 

Address on ** Literature " at the annual dinner of the 
Royal Academy held at Burlington House, London, 
May 3, 1886. 
American Ideas for English Readers, 1892. 



L 



[ 178 ] 

Address on Dante. 

Fifth Annual Report of the Dante Society, May 16, 

1886. Cambridge, 1886, 8vo. 

Address on Founding of Harvard University. 

A Record of the Commemoration, Nov. 5th to 8th, 1886, 
on the Two Hundred and Fiftieth Anniversary of the 
Founding of Harvard University. 8vo, Cambridge, 1887. 

Atlantic Monthly, December, 1886. Supplement i. 
Oration of James Russell Lowell, and the Poem of Oliver 
Wendell Holmes, delivered in Sanders Theatre, Cam- 
bridge, November 8, 1886, on the two hundred and 
fiftieth anniversary of the foundation. 

Democracy, and Other Addresses, 1886. 

Tribute to Charles Francis Adams at the meeting of 
the Massachusetts Historical Society held in December, 
1886. 
Proceedings, second series, v. 3, p. 149. 

Address at Anniversary of West Church. 

The West Church, Boston. Commemorative Services 
on the Fiftieth Anniversary of its Present Ministry and 
One Hundred and Fiftieth of its Foundation, March 1, 

1887. Boston, 1887, 8vo. 

Address on International Copyright in Chickering 
Hall, New York, November 28, 1887. Lowell presided 
at Author's Reading, read two of his short poems, and 
gave address. 

The Critic, "Lowell's Address on International Copy- 
right," December 3, 1887, v. 8, p. 281. 

Speech from the Chair at the Meeting for the 
Formation of the International Copyright Asso- 
ciation, December 27, 1887. 
Proceedings, Boston, 1888, 8vo. 

Address at a Meeting of the Tariff Reform League, 
Boston, December 29, 1887. 

Literary and Political Addresses, 1890. 



[179] 

The Independent in Politics. An address delivered 
before the Reform Club of New York [at Steinway Hall], 
April 13, 1888. 

Reform Club Series. I. New York, The Reform Club, 
1888. Pp. 27. 8vo, paper. 

Questions of the Day Series, no. 48. Putnams, New 
York, pp. 27, 12mo, 1888. 

New York Evening Post, April 17, 1888. 

Literary and Pohtical Addresses, 1890. 

Report of the Proceedings at the Dinner given by 
THE Society of Authors to American Men and 
Women of Letters, at the Criterion Restaurant, 
ON Wednesday, July 25, 1888. London, Society of 
Authors, 1888, 8vo. pp. 18. 

American Ideas for English Readers, 1902. 

Speech at a Banquet of the Liverpool Philomathic 
Society, November 23, 1888, held at the Adelphi Hotel. 
American Ideas for Enghsh Readers, 1892. 

Address at Washington Centenary. 
The Washington Centenary Celebration in New York, 
April 29, 30-May 1, 1889. 8vo, New York, 1889. Ad- 
dress by Lowell on " Literature's Part in the Celebration." 
Critic, May 4, 1889, v. 14, p. 225. 
Literary and Pohtical Addresses, 1890. Our Literature. 

Address on Study of Languages. 

Publications of the Modem Language Association, 
vol. V, no. 1. Baltimore, 1890, 8vo. Address by Lowell 
[on "Three Dead Languages: Hebrew, Greek, and 
Latin."] 

Latest Literary Essays and Addresses, 1892. 



BIOGRAPHIES, LETTERS, REMIN- 
ISCENCES 

Alpha Delta Phi Reunion Dinner in New York, 1875. 
New York, privately printed, 1876. Letter by Lowell. 

Arbor Day. Edited by Robert W. Furnas. Lincoln, Ne- 
braska, State Journal Co., 1888, 8vo. With a letter by 
Lowell to H. L. Wood, "a tribute of friendly gratitude 
for the inventor of Arbor Day." 

Art of Authorship. Compiled and Edited by George 
Bainton. New York, Appleton, 1890. Letter by Lowell, 
p. 29. 

Benton, Joel. Century, "Lowell's Americanism," No- 
vember, 1891, V. 43, p. 120. Contains letter from Lowell 
to Benton on "The World's Fair," and "Tempora 
Mutantur." 

Book-Buyer, January, 1906, v. 30, p. 231. Letter of 1887, 
about Mrs. Brookfield, to the Editor of Scribner's Maga- 
zine, in which the letters of Thackeray to her first ap- 
peared, 1889. 

Books and Letters collected by William Harris 
Arnold of New York. The Marion Press. Jamaica, 
Queensborough, New York, 1901. Three letters by 
Lowell, p. 110. 

Brainard, Charles H. John Howard Payne: A Bio- 
graphical Sketch of the Author of " Home, Sweet Home," 
with a narrative of the removal of his remains from 
Tunis to Washington. Boston, Cupples, Upham & Co., 
1885. Letters by Lowell, pp. 83, 89. 



[ 181 ] 

Brown, Emma Elizabeth. Life of James Russell Lowell. 
Boston, D, Lothrop, 1887. 12mo, pp. 354, cloth. 

Bulletin of the New York Public Library. Letters 
by Lowell to Evert Augustus Duyckinck, v. 2, p. 444, 
V. 4, p. 339, nine letters in all, written from 1843 to 1854. 

Clarke, Mary A. Century, February, 1896, v. 51, p. 545. 
Three letters by Lowell. 

Critic, The. 

Letter on International Copyright to Miss Kate Field, 
reprinted from Kate Field's Washington oi May 21, 1890, 
May 24, 1890, v. 13, p. 252. 

Letter of advice to Mrs. H. B. Stowe, v. 14, p. 11. 

Letter, September 12, 1891, v. 16, p. 134. 

Letter to Robert CoUyer, November 19, 1891, v. 16, 
p. 292. 

Letters, November 28, 1891, v. 16, p. 291. 

Letter to Joseph B. Gilder, November 4, 1893, v. 23, 
p. 289. 

Letter, December 30, 1893, v. 23, p. 428. 

Curtis, George William. James Russell Lowell : an Ad- 
dress [at the Brooklyn Listitute, February 22, 1892]. 
New York, Harpers, 1892. 32mo, pp. 64, cloth. Re- 
printed in Orations and Addresses, v. 3, 1894. 

Memorials of Two Friends, James Russell Lowell: 
1819-1891, George William Curtis: 1824-1892. New 
York, Privately Printed [The Gillispie Press], 1902. 
50 copies printed. Contains Curtis on Lowell, Lowell's 
"Epistle to George William Curtis," and Charles Eliot 
Norton's " Life and Character of George WilHam Curtis." 

Executive Documents, 3d Session, 45th Congress, 1878- 
79. Volume 1. Foreign Relations of the United States. 
Washington, 1879. Lowell's letters from Spain to the 
State Department. 



[ 182 ] 

Critic, September, 1898, v. S3, p. 171. "Mr. Lowell 
in Spain." 

Century, November, 1898, v. 57, p. 140. "Lowell's 
Impressionsof Spain. From Hitherto Unpublished Offi- 
cial Despatches. With a prefatory note on Spanish Poli- 
tics by Hon. A. A. Adee." 

Impressions of Spain. Compiled by Joseph B. Gilder, 
with an introduction by A. A. Adee. Boston, Houghton, 
Mifflin & Co., 1899. 12mo, pp. ix, 107, portrait. Con- 
tains Lowell's letters from Spain to the State Depart- 
ment. 

Farrar, Frederick William. Independent, "Reminis- 
cences of Lowell," May 20, 1897, v. 49, p. 633. 

Gill, William F. Life of Edgar Allan Poe. New York, 
Appleton, 1877. Letters by Lowell. 

Gordon, Lady Camilla. Suffolk Tales and Other Stories. 
London, 1897. Includes *'A Few Personal Reminiscences 
of James Russell Lowell." 

Greenslet, Ferris. James Russell Lowell : His Life and 
Work. Boston, Houghton, Mifflin & Co., 1905. 12mo, 
pp. 309, cloth. 

Griswold, Rufus W., Passages from the Correspondence 
of. Cambridge, 1901. Letter of Lowell, p. 151. 

Hale, Edward Everett. Lowell and his Friends. The 
Outlook, February 5 to December, 1898, v. 58, p. 329, 
to V, 60, p. 853. 

James Russell Lowell and his Friends. Boston, 
Houghton, Mifflin & Co., 1898, 8vo, pp. viii, 303. 

Hale, Edward Everett, Jr. James Russell Lowell. 
Boston, Small, Maynard & Co., 1899, 24mo, pp. xviii, 
128. (Beacon Biographies.) BibUography, pp. 124-128. 

Hallowell, Mrs. Anna D. Harper's Weekly, April 23, 



[ 183 ] 

1892, V. 36, p. 393. **An Episode in the Life of James 
Russell Lowell." Includes a dozen letters, and " A Rally- 
ing Cry for New England against the Annexation of 
Texas." 

Harrison, Gabriel. John Howard Payne, Dramatist, 
Poet, Actor: His Life and Writings. Philadelphia, 1885, 
8vo. Contains three letters by Lowell relating to the 
removal of the remains of Payne from Tunis to Wash- 
ington. 

Harrison, James A. Life and Letters of Edgar Allan Poe. 
New York, Crowell, 1902. Numerous letters from Lowell . 

HiGGiNSON, Thomas Wentworth. Book and Heart: 
Essays on Literature and Life. New York, Harpers, 
1897. " Lowell's Closing Years in Cambridge." 

Old Cambridge. New York, Macmillan, 1899. Last 
essay is on Lowell, and includes several letters. 

Part of a Man's Life. Boston, Houghton, Mifflin & 
Co., 1905. Contains letter by Lowell. 

House, Edward Howard. Harper's Weekly, September 3, 
1892, V. 36, p. 850. "A First Interview with Lowell." 

Letters of James Russell Lowell. Edited by Charles 
EUot Norton. In two volumes, 8vo, New York, Harpers, 
1894. [1893.] Portraits. Vol. i, pp. viii, 418; vol. ii, 
pp. 464. 

Letters of James Russell Lowell. Edited by Charles 
Eliot Norton. In three volumes. Boston, Houghton, 
Mifflin & Co., 1904. Vol. i, pp. viii, 348; vol. ii, pp. 409; 
vol. Ill, pp. 370. Vols. XIV, XV, xvi, Elmwood Edition 
of Lowell's Works. Portraits and illustrations. 

"The present edition of the collected writings of 
James Russell Lowell has been enriched by the addition 
of three volumes containing his * Letters,' edited by 
Charles Eliot Norton. In these three volumes are in- 



[ 184 ] 

eluded many letters hitherto unpublished, which have 
been inserted by Professor Norton in their proper 
chronological order." 

Lowell, Abbott Lawrence. Proceedings of the Massa- 
chusetts Historical Society. Second series, v. 11, p. 75, 
"Memoir of James Russell Lowell." Reprinted from 
the Proceedings of May and June, 1896. Cambridge, 
John Wilson & Son, University Press, 1896. 8vo, paper. 

Military Order of the Royal Legion of the United 
States. Massachusetts Commandery. In Memoriam: 
James Russell Lowell. Boston, 1892, 8vo, pp. 8. 

Oregon, Sources of the History of. Vol. i. Corre- 
spondence and Journals of Captain Nathaniel J. Wyeth. 
Eugene, University Press, 1899. Preface contains letter 
by Lowell. 

Parker, Clara M. Christian Union, "Visit to Lowell," 
v. 45, p. 1146. 

PoE, Edgar Allan, Works of the late. With Notices of 
his Life and Genius, by N. P. Willis, J. R. Lowell, 
and R. W. Griswold. New York, J. S. Redfield, 1850. 
In two volumes, 12mo. 

Proceedings at the Presentation of a Portrait of 
John Greenleaf Whittier to Friends' School, Provi- 
dence, R. I. Cambridge, 1885. Letter and sonnet by 
Lowell. 

Report of the Committee of the Association of the 
Alumni of Harvard College, July 16, 1857. With 
a statement of deficiencies in the Library of Harvard 
University. Cambridge, 1858. 8vo. Report prepared 
by Lowell. 

Rome, The Old and the New, and Other Studies. 
London: Grant Richards, 1897. Contains "A Few of 
Lowell's Letters." 



[ 185 ] 

Savage, Minot Judson. Arena, "A Morning with 
Lowell," December, 1895, v. 15, p. 1. 

ScuDDER, Horace Elisha. James Russell Lowell: A 
Biography. Li two volumes. Boston, Houghton, Mifflin 
& Co., 1901. 12mo, cloth. Vol. i, pp. ix, 455; vol. ii, 
pp. 482. " A List of the Writings of James Russell Lowell, 
arranged as nearly as may be in order of PubUcation," 
pp. 421-447, vol. II. 

Soldiers' Field, The. June 10, 1890. Cambridge, 8vo, 
1890. Contains inscriptions prepared by Lowell. 

Sparks from the Philosopher's Stone. By J. L. Bas- 
ford. London, 1882, square 16mo. Contains letter by 
Lowell. 

Stillman, William James. The Autobiography of a 
Journalist. Li two volumes. Boston, Houghton, 
Mifflin & Co., 1901. Chapter xiv is devoted to reminis- 
cences of Lowell, and there are other references. 

Stoddard, Richard Henry. Recollections: Personal 
and Literary. New York, Barnes, 1903. Contains "At 
Lowell's Fireside." 

Story of the Memorial Fountain to Shakespeare 
AT Stratford-upon-Avon, The. Edited by E. Clarke 
Davis. Cambridge, Riverside Press, 1890. Contains 
letter by Lowell. 

Sword and the Pen, The. Daily newspaper published 
in the interest of the Soldiers' Home Bazaar, Boston, 
December 7-17, 1881. Letter from Lowell in no. 7, 
Dec. 14. 

The Two Hundred and Fiftieth Anniversary of the 
Settlement of Newbury, Newburyport, 1885. Letter 
by Lowell. 

Unclaimed Estates in England. Contains letter by 



[186] 

Lowell, dated November 15, 1884, to the Secretary of 
State, with accompanying letters, Washington, pp. 16, 
8vo. [1894?] 

Underwood, Francis Henry. James Russell Lowell: A 
Biographical Sketch. Boston, James R. Osgood & Co., 
1882. 8vo, pp. 167. Illustrations. 

Harper's Magazine, January, 1881, v. 62, p. 252. 
" James Russell Lowell," with illustrations. 

Contemporary Review, October, 1891, v. 60, p. 477. 
" James Russell Lowell." 

The Poet and the Man: Recollections and Apprecia- 
tions of James Russell Lowell. Boston, Lee and Shepard, 
1893. 12mo, pp. 138. Bibliography, pp. 129-133. 

What American Authors think about International 
Copyright. New York, 1888, 8vo. Letter by Lowell. 

WooDBERRY, George Edward. Ccutury, August, 1894, 
V. 16, p. 170. "Lowell's Letters to Poe," nine in all. 
Reprinted in Harrison's Ed. of Poe's Works, v. 17. 



NOTICES AND CRITICISMS 

Academy. 

" The Official LoweU." January 11, 1902, v. 62, p. 667. 
" Beginnings of an Author." January 17, 1903, v. 64, 
p. 65. 

"Litterateur, Ambassador, Patriot, CosmopoKte." 
July 29, 1899, v. 57, p. 113. 
"A Neglected Lowell." August 5, 1899, v. 57, p. 135. 

Addresses. Lowell Commemoration in Architekten- 
HAUS, Berlin, February 19, 1897, by Alois Brandl, 
Hermann Grimm, and James Taft Hatfield. Berlin, 
Mayer & Mutter, 1897, pp. 28, 8vo. 

Akers, Charles. 

New England Magazine, "Personal Glimpses ^of our 
New England Poets," December, 1897, v. 17, n. s., 
p. 446. 

Anderson, M. B. 

The Dial, v. 7, p. 241. 
The Dial, v. 9, p. 95. 

Athen^um. 

"Letters of James Russell Lowell." October 28, 1893, 
V. 2, p. 581. 

"Last Poems." January 4, 1896, v. 1, p. 12. 
"Scudder's Life." February 22, 1902, v. 12, p. 235. 

Atlantic Monthly. 

"Mr. Lowell's Politics." August, 1888, v. 62, p. 274. 

"Mr. Lowell and the Atlantic." October, 1891, v. 68, 
p. 576. 

" Lowell's Last Poems." February, 1896, v. 77, p. 267. 

"Conversations with Mr. Lowell." January, 1897, 
V. 79, p. 127. 



[ 188 ] 

"Lowell's Temperament." December, 1902, v. 90, 
p. 862. 

"Mr. Scudder's Life of Lowell." February, 1902, 
V. 89, p. 254. 

Banckoft, George. 

Literary World, "Our ablest Critic," June 27, 1885, 
V. 16, p. 217. 

Bartlett, David W. 

Modem Agitators or Pen Portraits, "James Russell 
Lowell." New York, Saxton, 1855. 

Bartol, Cyrus Augustus. 

Literary World, " The Songster of Elmwood," June 27, 
1885, V. 16, p. 217. 

Beals, Susan B. 

Outline Studies in James Russell Lowell, his Poetry 
and Prose, Chicago, Kerr & Co., 1887. 16mo, pp. 32. 

Benton, Joel. 

Century, "Lowell's Americanism," November, 1891, 
V. 21, n. s., p. 119. 

Blathwatt, Raymond. 

Review of Reviews, "A Last Interview at Ehnwood," 
October, 1891, v. 4, p. 307. 

Bolton, Sarah Knowles. 

Famous American Authors. New York, Crowell, 
1887, p. 156. 

Book-Buyer. 

September, 1900, v. 21, p. 78. 

BowEN, Francis. 

North American Review, "The New Timon," April, 
1847, V. 64, p. 460. 

The same " Humorous and Satirical Poetry," January, 
1849, V. 68, p. 183. 



[189] 

Briggs, C. F. 

Journeys to Homes of American Authors. New York, 
Putnams, 1853. j»4 

Brooks, Charles Timothy. 

Christian Examiner, "Conversations on the Old 
Poets," March, 1845, v. 38, p. 211. 

Brown, Emma Elizabeth. 

Life of James Russell Lowell. Boston, Lothrop, 1887, 
12mo, pp. 354. 

Brownson, Orestes Augustus. 
Works, V. 19, p. 308. 

Bungay, George W. 

Off-hand Takings or Crayon Sketches of Noticeable 
Men of Our Age. New York, De Witt & Davenport, 1854. 
Traits of Representative Men. New York, Fowler & 
Wells, 1882. Lowell, pp. 11-25. 

Burton, Richard. 

Literary Leaders of America. New York, Scribners, 
1905. Lowell, pp. 241-254. 

Cambridge Tribune. 

Lowell Memorial Number. February 20, 1892. 

Charles Eliot Norton, "Mr. Lowell and Cambridge." 
Charlotte Fiske Bates, "Lowell's Elmwood." 
Frank L. Chapman, "Lowell in Politics." 
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, "Tribute to James 

Russell Lowell." 
Andrew P. Peabody, "Mr. Lowell as a Teacher." 
OHver Wendell Holmes, "A Long and Interesting 

Friendship." 

Sarah Warner Brooks, "Lowell as a Helpful and 

Kindly Critic." 

William Winter, " Lowell and Longfellow." 
Charles W. EUot, "Lowell as a Professor." 



[ 190 ] 

Christoplier P. Cranch, "One of Lowell's Intimate 
Friends." 
Alexander McKenzie, "A Few Recollections." 

Capen, Oliver Bronson. 

Country Homes of Famous Americans. New York, 
Doubleday, Page & Co., 1905. 

Cart, Elizabeth Luther. 

Book-Buyer, July, 1899, v. 18, p. 431. 

Chadwick, John White. 

Forum, "Lowell in his Letters," March, 1894, v. 17, 
p. 114. 

Nation, "Scudder's Lowell," November 28, 1901, 
V. 73, p. 416. 

Unitarian Review, "Lowell's Mind and Art: a Criti- 
cism," V. 63, p. 456. 

Chamberlain, D. H. 

New Englander, December, 1891, v. 55, p. 477. 

Cheney, John Vance. 

That Dome in Air: Thoughts on Poetry and the Poets. 
Chicago, McClurg, 1895. Lowell, pp. 61-99. 

Chautauquan, " Writings of Lowell," v. 16, p. 554. 

Comhill Magazine, "Lowell's Poems," January, 1875, 
V. 31, p. 65. Same, Littell's Living Age, February 6, 
1875, V. 124, p. 387. 

CoRTissoz, Royal. 

Century, "Some Writers of Good Letters," March, 
1897, V. 31, p. 780. 

Cranch, Christopher Pearse. 

Critic, February 23, 1889, v. 14, p. 93. 

Critic. 

"The Authorship of 'Richard III,'" March 5, 1887, 
V. 7, p. 109. 



[ 191 ] 

"Speech at Liverpool," December 15, 1888, v. 13, 
p. 305. 

"Mr. Lowell on Mr. Cleveland," December 28, 1889, 
V. 15, p. 327. 

"Seventieth Birthday," Special Lowell number, Feb- 
ruary 23; also March 2, 1889, v. 14, pp. 85, 104. 

"The Riverside Lowell," February, 1891, v. 15, p. 91. 

" Old English Dramatists," January 7, 1893, v. 19, p. 1. 

"Underwood's Lowell," April 29, 1893, v. 19, p. 274. 

"Celebration of Lowell's Seventy-third Birthday," 
March 5, 1892, v. 20, p. 147. 

"Lowell as Poet and Man" [Underwood's Book], 
April 19, 1893, v. 22, p. 274. 

Letters as edited by Norton, November 4, 1893, v. 23, 
p. 282. 

"The Lowell Memorial," December 2, 16, 23, 1893, 
V. 23, p. 365, 400, 414. 

"Memorial Park," November 27, 1897, v. 31, p. 331. 

"Hale's Lowell and his Friends," June, 1899, v. 34, 
p. 521. 

"Scudder's Biography," February, 1902, v. 40, p. 121. 

George E. Woodberry, "James Russell Lowell at 
Ehnwood," March 27, 1886, v. 8, p. 151. 

Thomas Hughes, "Mr. Lowell's * Fable' and 'Un- 
happy Lot,' " March 27, 1886, v. 8, p. 152. 

" International Copyright," May 24, 1890, v. 13, p. 262. 

"Prof. Norton's Tribute to Lowell," May 6, 1893, 
V. 22, p. 287. 

Current Literature. 

"Talkative Aspect of Lowell's Genius," December, 
1905, V. 39, p. 614. 

Curtis, George William. 

Harper's Magazine, "Mr. Lowell's Birmingham 
Address," March, 1881, v. 70, p. 644. 



[ 192 ] 

James Russell Lowell: An Address. Brooklyn Insti- 
tute, February 22, 1892. New York, Harpers, 1892. 

The Same. Orations and Addresses, v. 3, 1894. 
Dennett, J. R. 

Nation, "Lowell's Essays," April 21, 1870, v. 10, p. 
258. 

DuRGEE, George W. W. 

Book-Buyer," First Editions of Lowell," July, 1899, 
V. 18, p. 436. 

Edinburgh Review. 

" James Russell Lowell," January, 1900, v. 191, p. 157. 
"The Writings of James Russell Lowell," October, 
1891, V. 174, p. 377. Same, Littell's Living Age, Decem- 
ber 5, 1891, V. 191, p. 579. 

Eliot, Charles William. 

Annual Report of the President and Treasurer of 
Harvard College, 1890-91, p. 3. 

Emerson, Oliver Farrar. 

Dial, "James Russell Lowell, 1819-1891," September, 
1891, V. 12, p. 183. 

Farrar, Frederic William. 

Forum, "English Estimate of Lowell," October, 1891, 
V. 12, p. 141. 

Lidependent, "Reminiscences of Lowell," May 20, 
1897, V. 49, p. 633. 

Feuton, Cornelius Conway. 

North American Review, "Lowell's Poems," April, 
1844, V. 58, p. 283. 

French, C. N. 

Illustrated American, "Elmwood," August 1, 1896, 
V. 20, p. 179. 

Gamble, W. M. 

Conservative Review, v. 2, p. 149. 



[ 193] 

GiLMORE, Joseph Henry. 

Chautauquan, "Biglow Papers," April, 1896, v. 23, 
p. 19. 

GiNER DE LOS RiOS, FrANCISCO. 

Boletin de la institucion libre de ensenanza, August 31, 
1891, p. Ml. 

GoDKiN, Edwin Lawrence. 

Nation, "Mr. Lowell and the Irisli," May 25, 1882, 
V. 34, p. 438. 

Nation, "The Reasons why Mr. Lowell should be 
recalled," June 1, 1882, v. 34, p. 457. 

Nation, "Mr. Lowell," May 28, 1885, v. 40, p. 436. 

Gordon, Lady Camilla. 

Suffolk Tales and Other Stories, "A Few Personal 
Reminiscences of James Russell Lowell," London, 1897, 
p. 135. 

Graham's Magazine. 

"Lowell's Poems," April, 1842, v. 20, p. 195. 

Green, George Walton. 

International Review, "Mr. Lowell and the Lish- 
American Suspects," June, 1882, v. 12, p. 592. 

Griswold, Rufus Wilmot. 

Poets and Poetry of America, Philadelphia, Parry & 
McMillan, 1858. 

Griswold, Hattie Tyng. 

Home Life of American Authors, Chicago, McClurg, 
1887. 

Personal Sketches of Recent Authors, Chicago, 
McClurg, 1899. 

Grubb, Edward. 

New England Magazine, "The Socialism of James 
Russell Lowell," July, 1892, v. 6, n. s., p. 676. 



[ 194] 

Hale, Edward Everett. 

New England Magazine, October, 1891, v. 5, n. s., 
p. 183. 

Outlook, " Lowell and his Friends," February to De- 
cember, 1898, w. 59, 60. 

Hale, Edward Everett, Jr. 

Reader, " Literary Work of Lowell," July, 1905, v. 6, 
p. 233. 

Hallowell, Anna D. 

Harper's Weekly, "An Episode in the Life of James 
Russell Lowell," April 23, 1892, v. 36, p. 393. 

Harper's Magazine. 

"Works of Lowell," June, 1891, v. 83, p. 152. 

Birmingham address. Easy Chair, March, 1885, v. 70, 
p. 644. 

" One View of Lowell," November, 1891, v. 83, p. 961. 

Lowell's death. Easy Chair, November, 1891, v. 83, 
p. 961. 

Harper's Weekly. 

" Lowell and Howells," January 25, 1902, v. 46, p. 101. 

Harris, Joel Chandler. 

Critic, March 2, 1889, v. 14, p. 105. 

Harrison, James A. 

Critic, February 23, 1889, v. 14, p. 90. 

Hart, James Morgan. 

PubUcations Modem Language Association [Address 
in Memory of Lowell], Baltimore, 1892, v. 7, p. 25. 

Harte, Bret. 

New Review, "A Few Words about Lowell," Septem- 
ber, 1891, V. 5, p. 193. 

Harvard Graduates' Magazine. 
March, 1902, v. 10, p. 345. 



[195] 

Haweis, Hugh Reginald. 

Gentleman's Magazine, "James Russell Lowell, Poet 
and Essayist," October, November, 1880, v. 249 (n. s. 25), 
pp. 464, 544. Same, LittelFs Living Age, October 30, 
November 20, 1880, v. 147, pp. 363, 564. 

American Humorists, London, Chatto & Windus, 1882, 
p. 75. 

HiGGiNsoN, Thomas Wentwokth. 

Critic, "Lowell in Cambridge," February 23, 1889, 
V. 14, p. 90. 

Nation, August 13, 1891, v. 53, p. 116. 

Nation, "Lowell's Letters," December 28, 1893, v. 57, 
p. 488. 

Independent, "Lowell and Mr. Smalley," May 14, 
1896, V. 48, p. 645. 

Book and Heart, "Lowell's Closing Years in Cam- 
bridge," 1897. 

Old Cambridge, New York, Macmillan, 1899. 

Outlook, "Greenslet's Life of Lowell," November 11, 
1905, V. 81, p. 625. 

HiLLAED, George Stillman. 

North American Review, "A Year's Life," April, 1841, 
V. 52, p. 452. 

Holland, Frederic Mat. 

New England Magazine, "Reading Dante with 
Lowell," January, 1896, v. 13, n. s., p. 575. 

Homes of American Authors. 
New York, Putnams, 1852. 

House, Edward Howard. 

Harper's Weekly, "A First Interview with Lowell," 
September 3, 1892, v. 36, p. 850. 

Howe, Mark Antony De Wolfe. 

Atlantic Monthly, "Last Poems," February, 1896, 
V. 77, p. 267. 



[196] 

Bookman, "Whittier and Lowell," March, 1898, v. 7, 
p. 35. 

American Bookmen, New York, Dodd, Mead & Co,, 
1898. 

Literature, " Lowell and his Friends," June 16, 1899, 
V. 4, p. 537. 

HowELLs, William Dean. 

Atlantic Monthly, "Poetical Works," January, 1877, 
V. 39, p. 93. 

Scribner's Magazine, " A Personal Retrospect of James 
Russell Lowell," September, 1900, v. 28, p. 363. 

Current Literature, January, 1901, v. 30, p. 48. 

Literary Friends and Acquaintances, " Studies of 
Lowell," 1900. 

HoRWiLL, Herbert W. 

New England Magazine, " Lowell's Influence in Eng- 
land," November, 1902, v. 27, n. s., p. 321. 

Hubbard, Elbert. 

Little Journeys to Homes of American Authors, v. 2, 
p. 123. 

Hughes, Thomas. 

Critic, "Fable for Critics," v. 8, p. 152. 

Huntington, Tulet Francis. 

Dial, "Lowell and his Friends," June 1, 1899, v. 26, 
p. 367. 

Litemational Review, "James Russell Lowell and 
Modem Literary Criticism," March, 1877, v. 4, p. 264. 

Jahrbxjcher preussische. 

"Lowell, der Satiriker, Nachklange amerikanische 
Gedachtnisreden in Berlin," v. 89, p. 133. 
James, Henry. 

Atlantic Monthly, January, 1892, v. 69, p. 35. 

Essays in London, New York, Harpers^ 1893. 

Warner's Library World's Best Literature, v. 16, 1897. 



[197] 

Jameson, John Franklin. 

Review of Reviews, "Lowell and Public Affairs," 
October, 1891, v. 4, p. 287. 

Johnson, W. H. 

Critic, February, 1902, v. 40, p. 121. 

Jones, R. D. 

Review of Reviews, " Lowell and the Public Schools," 
October, 1891, v. 4, p. 294. 

Kenton, J. B. 

Methodist Review, "Correspondence of Lowell," 
V. 61, p. 269. 

Keyser, Leander Sylvester. 

New England Magazine, "Lowell and the Birds," 
November, 1891, v. 5, n. s., p. 398. 

Knortz, Karl. 

Geschichte Nord-amerikanischen Literatur, v. 2, 
Berlin, Hans Luslenoder, 1891. 

KooPMAN, Harry Lyman. 

Literary World, "First Editions of the * Fable for 
Critics,' " January 8, March 5, 1898, v. 29, pp. 9, 74. 

Larremore, W. 

Overland Monthly, "Lowell the Poet," v. 10, n. s., 
p. 271. 

Lawton, William Cranston. 

Lippincott's Magazine, " Our Fullest Throat of Song," 
November, 1895, v. 5Q, p. 717. 

The New England Poets : A Study of Emerson, Haw- 
thorne, Longfellow, Whittier, Lowell, Holmes, New 
York, 1898. 

Lewin, Walter. 

Academy, August 22, 1891, v. 40, p. 155. 
Academy, *' Letters of Lowell," December 9, 1893, 
V. 44, p. 505. 



[ 198 ] 

LiTERAEY World. Lowell Number, June 27, 1885, v. 16, 
p. 217. 

Memorial to Lowell, March 19, 1898, v. 29, p. 89. 

Littell's Living Age. 

"The Death of Mr. Lowell," September 19, 1891, 
V. 190, p. 760. From The London Times. 

Livingston, Luther S. 

Bookman, "First Books of Some American Authors," 
October, 1898, v. 8, p. 138. 

LocKWooD, Ferris. 

Scribner's Monthly, "Mr. Lowell on Art Principles," 
February, 1894, v. 15, p. 186. 

Low, Sydney. 

Fortnightly Review, "Lowell in his Poetry," Septem- 
ber, 1891, V. 56, p. 310. 

Lowell, Abbott Lawrence. 

Proceedings Massachusetts Historical Society, second 
series, v. 11, p. 75. 

Mabie, Hamilton Wright. 

My Study Fire, second series, "Lowell's Letters," 
New York, Dodd, Mead & Co., 1894. 

Macleod, a. 

CathoHc Presbyterian, v. 8, p. 125. 

McCarthy, Justin. 

St. James Magazine, v. 34, p. 427. 

Mead, Edwin Doak. 

New England Magazine, " Lowell's Pioneer," October, 
1891, V. 5, n. s., p. 235. 

Means, D. MacG. 

Nation, "Lowell the Patriot," August 20, 1891, v. 53, 
p. 136. 



[ 199 ] 

Merrill, George B. 

James Russell Lowell: A Paper read at the annual 
dinner Harvard Club of San Francisco, October 22, 1891. 
San Francisco, Harvard Club, 1891. 

Metnell, Alice. 

The Rhythm of Life, and Other Essays, London, Lane, 
1893. 

MiMS, E. 

South Atlantic Quarterly, " Lowell as a Citizen," Jan- 
uary, 1902, V. 1, p. 27. 

Morse, James Herbert. 

Critic, February 23, 1889, v. 14, p. 88. 

Moulton, Louise Chandler. 
The Author, v. 3, p. 36. 

Nadal, Ehrman Stme. 

Critic, "Some Lnpressions of Mr. Lowell," February 
25, 1893, V. 19, p. 105. 

Nation. 

" James Russell Lowell," August 13, 1891, v. 53, p. 116. 
"Hale's Lowell," June 1, 1899, v. 68, p. 420. 
"Scudder's Lowell," November 28, 1901, v. 73, p. 416. 
" Lowell the Reformer," January 1, 1903, v. 76, p. 14. 
"Greenslet's Lowell," March 1, 8, 1906. 

National Magazine. 

"Lowell and Eugene Field," March, 1902, v. 15, 
p. 674. 

New Englander. 

*' Lowell and Browning," January, 1870, v. 29, p. 125. 

Norton, Charles Eliot. 

Harper's Magazine, "James Russell Lowell," May, 
1893, V. 86, p. 846. 

Harper's Magazine, "Letters of Lowell," September, 
1893, V. 87, p. 553. 



E 200 ] 

OssoLi, Makgaret Fuller. 

Art, Literature, and the Drama, "American Litera- 
ture," Boston, 1859, p. 308. 

Outlook. 

"Lowell as Man and Embassador," April S, 1897, 
V. 55, p. 881. 

Palmer, Roundell. 

International Review, "Lowell and Modem Criti- 
cism," 1877, V. 4, p. 264. 

Parker, Clara M. 

Christian Union, "Visit to Lowell," v. 45, p. 1146. 

Parton, James. 

Literary World, " Mr. Lowell's Return," June 27, 1885, 
V. 16, p. 219. 

Payne, Willlam Morton. 

Dial, "Scudder's Life," November 1, 1901, v. 31, 
p. 312. 

PoE, Edgar Allan. 

"Poems of Lowell," Harrison Ed., v. 4. Also v. 11, 
p. 243. 

"Autobiography," Harrison Ed., v. 15. 
"Poe and his Friends: Letters relating to Poe," v. 17, 
p. 158. 

Poet-Lore. 

" Lowell's * Vision of Sir Launfal,' " January, 1894, v. 6, 
p. 47. 

Pond, George Edward. 

Liber Scriptorum, "Lowell at Harvard," New York, 
Author's Club, 1893, p. 456. 

Powers, Horatio Nelson. 

Homes of the Elder Poets, p. 162. 



[201 ] 

Quarterly Review. 

"James Russell Lowell," July, 1902, v. 196, p. 61. 
The Same, LittelFs Living Age, September 13, 1902, 
V. 234, p. 641. 

RiANo, E. Gatangas de. 

Century, "Lowell and his Spanish Friends; with an 
Unpublished Poem," June, 1900, v. 38, p. 292. 

Rice, Wallace. 

Dial, " Lowell on Human Liberty," January 1, 1903, 
V. 34, p. 14. 

RiDEiNG, William Henry. 

CosmopoUtan, " Boyhood of Lowell," v. 4, p. 253. 

Roosevelt, Theodore. 

Critic, February 23, 1889, v. 14, p. 86. 

Sanborn, Franklin Benjamin. 

New England Magazine, "Home and Haunts of 
Lowell," November, 1891, v. 5, n. s., p. 275. 

Saturday Review. 

"An American Cassandra," August 4, 1888, v. 66, 
p. 147. 

Savage, Minot Judson. 

Arena, "The Rehgion of Lowell's Poems," May, 1894, 
V. 9, p. 705. 

The Same, "A Morning with Lowell," December, 
1895, V. 15, p. 1. 

ScuDDER, Horace Elisha. 

Atlantic Monthly, " Lowell, Brooks and Gray in their 
Letters," January, 1894, v. 73, p. 124. 

Proceedings American Academy of Arts and Sciences, 
V. 29, p. 423. 

Scribner's Magazine, "Mr. Lowell as a Teacher," 
November, 1891, v. 10, p. 645. 



[ 202 ] 

Shepard, William. 

Pen Pictures of Modern Authors, New York, Putnams, 
1882, V. 2. 

Skilding, Eugenia. 

Atlantic Monthly, " A Poet's Yorkshire Haunts," 
August, 1895, V. 76, p. 181. 
Smalley, George Washburn. 

London Letters, "Mr. Lowell; why the English liked 
him and what his influence has been," New York, 
Harpers, 1890, v. 1, p. 217. 

Harper's Magazine, " Mr. Lowell in England," April, 

1896, V. 92, p. 788. 

Smith, George Barnett. 

Nineteenth Century, June, 1885, v. 17, p. 988. Same, 
Littell's Living Age, July 4, 1885, v. 166, p. 3. 

Spalding, John Lancaster. 

Catholic World, "A Poet among the Poets," April, 
1876, V. 23, p. 14. 

Southern Review. 

"Life and Works," 1875, v. 18, p. 385. 

Spectator. 

"Mr. Lowell's Conundrum," February 2, 1884, p. 148. 
"Mr. Lowell on the Coming King," October 11, 1884, 
p. 1338. The Same, Littell's Living Age, November 8, 
1884, V. 163, p. 379. 

Stead, William Thomas. 

James Russell Lowell; his message, and how it helped 
me. London, 1891, 16mo, pp. 64. 

Stearns, Frank Preston. 

Cambridge Sketches, Philadelphia, LippincoU, 1905. 
Modern English Prose Authors. New York, Putnams, 

1897. Appendix : " Lowell on Carlyle's * Frederick.' " 



[203] 

Stedman, Edmund Clarence. 

Century, May, 1882, v. 2, p. 97. Same in "Poets of 
America." 

Steuart, J. H. 

Letters to Living Authors, 1890. 

Stewart, George. 

Evenings in a Library. 

Arena, October, 1891, v. 4, p. 513. 

Essays from Reviews, Quebec, Dawson, 1892. 

Stillman, William James. 

Nation, September 17, 1891, v. 53, p. 211. 

Atlantic Monthly, "A Few of LowelFs Letters," De- 
cember, 1892, V. 70, p. 744. 

Old Rome and the New, " A Few of Lowell's Letters," 
London, Grant Richards, 1897. 

Autobiography of a JoumaKst, chap. 14. Boston, 
Houghton, Miffllin & Co,, 1901. 

Stoddard, Richard Henry. 

North American Review, October, 1891, v. 153, p. 460. 
Poets' Homes, first series, Boston, Lothrop, 1877. 

Story, William Wetmore. 

Critic, March 2, 1889, v. 14, p. 105. 
Lippincott's Magazine, October, 1892, v. 50, p. 534. 
Recollections, Personal and Literary, "At Lowell's 
Fireside;" New York, Barnes, 1903. 
The Author, v. 3, p. 110. 

SuLPius, Friedrich von. 

"Etwas von Yankeesatiriker, James Russell Lowell," 
Beilage zur AUgemeinen Zeitung, 1897, v. 94. Munchen, 
1897, p. 5. 

Swift, Lindsay. 

Book-Buyer, "Lowell's Diplomatic Career," Septem- 
ber, 1900, v. 2, p. 92. 



[204 ] 

Temple Bab. 

" James Russell Lowell," September, 1892, v. 96, p. 88. 
The Same, Littell's Living Age, November 12, 1892, 
V. 195, p. 416. 

Taylor, Bayard. 

Critical Essays, New York, Putnams, 1880. 

Thompson, Maurice. 

Critic, February 23, 1889, v. 14, p. 86. 

Traill, Henry Duff. 

Fortnightly Review, "Mr. J. R. Lowell," July, 1885, 
V. 44, p. 79. The Same, Littell's Living Age, August 1, 
1885, V. 166, p. 280. 

Traubel, Horace. 

Poet-Lore, "Lowell, Whitman; a Contrast," January 
15, 1892, V. 4, p. 22. 

Underwood, Francis Henry. 

Good Words, v. 28, p. 521. 

Harper's Magazine, January, 1881, v. 62, p. 252. 

Contemporary, October, 1891, v. 60, p. 477. 

James Russell Lowell; a Biographical Sketch, Boston, 
Osgood, 1882. 

The Poet and the Man; Recollections and Apprecia- 
tions of James Russell Lowell, Boston, Lee & Shepard, 
1893. 

Our Day, " Lowell as a Reformer and Poet," Novem- 
ber, December, 1891, v. 8, pp. 347, 444. 

Warner, Charles Dudley. 

Literary World, "The Real American at his best," 
June 27, 1885, v. 16, p. 219. 

Critic, February 23, 1889, v. 14, p. 85. 

Watson, William. 

Excursions in Criticism, "Lowell as a Critic," London, 
Lane, 1893. 



[ 205 ] 

Watts-Dunton, Theodore. 
Athenaeum, v. 2, p. 257. 

Wendell, Barrett. 

Stelligeri, "Lowell as a Teacher," New York, Scrib- 
ners, 1893. 

Whipple, Edwin Percy. 

Harper's Magazine, March, 1876, v. 52, p. 516. 
Outlooks on Society, "Lowell as a Prose Writer," 
Boston, Ticknor, 1888. 

Wilkinson, William Cleaver. 

Baptist Quarterly, "The Cathedral," v. 14, p. 374. 

The Same, "Hours at Home," v. 10, p. 541. 

Scribner's Magazine, May, June, July, 1872, v. 4, o. s., 
pp. 75, 227, 339. 

A Free Lance in the Field of Life and Letters, " Mr. 
Lowell's Poetry," "Mr. Lowell's * Cathedral,'" "Mr. 
Lowell's Prose," New York, Funk & Wagnalls, 1874. 

Will, Thomas Elmer. 

Arena, "Poet of Freedom," March, 1904, v. 31, p. 262. 

Winchester, Caleb Thomas. 

Review of Reviews, "Lowell as a Man of Letters," 
October, 1891, v. 4, p. 291. 

Wister, S. B. 

Atlantic Monthly, "Conversations with Mr. Lowell," 
January, 1897, v. 79, p. 127. 

WOODBERRY, GeORGE EdWARD. 

Critic, "Lowell at Elmwood," v. 8. p. 151. 

Nation, "Mr. Lowell's new Volume," December 23, 
1886, V. 43, p. 525. 

Atlantic Monthly, "Mr. Lowell on Izaak Walton," 
February, 1890, v. 65, p. 266. 
V Century, November, 1891, v. 21, n. s., p. 113. 



[ 206 ] 

Scribner's Magazine, "Lowell's Letters to Poe," 
August, 1894, V. 16, p. 170. 

Makers of Literature, New York, Macmillan, 1900. 
Authors at Home, New York, Scrihners, 1889. 

Wright, Henrietta Christian. 

Children's Stories in American Literature, New York, 
Scribners, 1895, Lowell, pp. 203-205. 

Writer, "Personal Tributes to Lowell," September, 
October, 1891, v. 5, pp. 185, 210. 



MANUSCRIPTS 

A large quantity of Lowell's notebooks, manu- 
scripts of lectures, newspaper clippings of lec- 
tures, letters, and other materials, have been 
given by Professor Charles Eliot Norton to the 
library of Harvard University. This collection 
is especially rich in letters from Lowell's numer- 
ous friends and correspondents. In his letter of 
presentation Professor Norton describes these 
letters : 

"There are thirteen (13) portfolios containing letters 
addressed to him by American correspondents for the most 
part previously to his being sent to Spain as our minister. 
The letters in these portfolios are arranged in alphabetical 
order, and many of them are of value as autographs, and 
of interest as illustrating the conditions of American litera- 
ture from about the middle of the last century onward. 
Many of them contain interesting matter concerning the 
literary projects of a time that was full of them, both in 
New York and in Boston. The little group of authors who 
tried to make New York a literary centre, from 1840 to 
1850, and whose names even now are almost forgotten, are 
well represented in the letters of Duyckinck, Cornelius Mat- 
thews, James, and others. There are a number of letters 
relating to the early years of the Atlantic Monthly; and you 
will see that there is a very considerable parcel of letters of 
Dr. Holmes, and what is perhaps of still more interest, a yet 
larger parcel of letters of John Holmes. There is also a 
number of Whittier's letters and poems. 

" But, beside the literary interests which are represented 
in these letters, the anti-slavery interests are also largely 



[ 208 ] 

illustrated by a very considerable number of letters of 
Edmund Quincy, of Wendell Phillips, and of others, — 
the leaders in that cause. 

"Both these groups of letters are imperfect, because of 
many having been returned to their writers, or to the repre- 
sentatives of their writers. Perhaps the most important 
letters of early years which are missing here are those of 
Charles F. Briggs, who at the time of Mr. Lowell's begin- 
nings in literature was his closest friend and most frequent 
correspondent. His letters have gone back to his family, 
who desired them. In the case of some other writers, 
themselves dead, but who have living representatives, I have 
obtained permission to retain their letters, and to give them 
to the college. The most important case of this kind is 
that of Mr. Richard Grant White, whose numerous letters 
are of more than usual interest. 

"In addition to these portfolios are two containing the 
letters of numerous English correspondents, of which 
perhaps the most interesting are the numerous letters of 
Judge Thomas Hughes ; but there are many others of liter- 
ary or other interest. These also are arranged in alpha- 
betical order, but there are two portfolios in which the 
letters are not arranged alphabetically, but chronologically. 
They are of late years, — 1885 to 1890, — and the letters 
are for the most part mere notes, of more interest for their 
writer's sake than for their contents." 



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